ISRS Banner

WORKSHOPS

Special session titles:

Balancing Multiple Uses of River Systems: Past, Present and Future Navigation Infrastructure and River Ecosystem Considerations
This session will focus on historical river alterations, current opportunities for improving alignment between navigation and river ecosystems and future river management that balances navigation and ecosystem needs for long term sustainability. Keying in on this knowledge we can improve rivers management for these multiple uses while adapting to climate change.

Fluvial Geomorphic Response to Landscape Disturbance: A Tribute to the Life and Career of James C. Knox
This session is in memoriam of James C. Knox and his 43 year career at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. We welcome papers that celebrate the theme of Jim’s best known work: impacts of landscape level disturbance on river systems. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to, flood chronology, climate change, agriculture, and sediment transport and deposition.

Ecohydraulics of Mollusks and Other Benthic Macroinvertebrates in Rivers
It is widely recognized that the structure and function of biological communities in rivers and lakes are largely controlled by the interaction of biological, chemical and physical processes acting across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Yet, we know relatively little about how river hydrology and hydraulics influence the distribution and abundance of mollusks and other benthic macroinvertebrates.

Divesting River Management Infrastructure: Ecological Implications and Conservation Approaches
The goal of this session is to gather scientists and managers to discuss opportunities and challenges related to divesting aging or obsolete river management infrastructure, including dams, navigation locks, levees, and training structures; share science regarding the ecological benefits of managing for connected rivers; and identify knowledge gaps related to the management and restoration of large rivers via decommissioning.

Fish Passage Connectivity Tools: Status and Case Studies
Many resident and migratory organisms require connected watersheds to complete their life cycles. However, barriers such as dams and road crossings have proliferated on the riverine landscape. This session examines techniques and tools for assessing the crucial role of watershed connectivity in maintaining ecosystem integrity. Case studies are presented through the lenses of both barrier removal and barrier construction.

Functional Flows: Designing Flow Regimes in Highly Managed River Systems to Enhance Ecological and Geomorphic Processes
Environmental flow management in highly modified rivers remains challenging; however, recent approaches that provide functional flows or retain process-based components of the hydrograph may better support ecosystem services. This special session invites presentations that address ecological and geomorphic functionality within environmental flows, provide examples of implemented process-based flow regimes, and discuss how functional flow regimes can be broadly applied.

Ecosystem Services in Rivers: Connecting Upstream to Downstream and People to their River
This session will examine the status and challenges of assessing, and valuing riverine ecosystem services. The application of the ecosystem service approach to rivers is urgently required but scientifically challenging. The session will represent the 1st meeting of the ISRS working group on “riverine ecosystem services” and an opportunity to build an international network of scientists interested in riverine ecosystem services.

Connectivity and Water Level Manipulation for Large Scale Restoration - Comprehensive Assesment of the Responses of the Emiquon Preserve
The habitat succession and biotic response of microbes, plankton, vegetation, fish, waterfowl and local community to a 2800 ha floodplain restoration will be detailed. Presentations will relate the restoration response to ecological theories (importance of ecological thresholds, appropriate lag times, and alternate stable states) and controversies such as resiliency to the impacts of invasive species and flooding.

Rivers and Watersheds—Making the Connections Between Modeling, Ecology, and Water Quality
Hydrologic processes fundamentally influence the high productivity characteristics of river floodplain ecosystems and affect numerous physical, biological, and chemical conditions. Engineers, scientists, biologists, and ecologists need to develop a better understanding of these complex interactions for effective resource management and river restoration. This session will highlight new ways of making these connections using innovative hydrodynamic modeling, water-quality, and hydroinformatics tools.

Big Rivers, Big Data: What are We Learning from Large-Scale, Long-Term Data Sets from Large River Ecosystems
Large rivers are spatially extensive and highly variable in space and time. Understanding the causes and consequences of this variability and its implications for large river ecosystems requires data that is appropriately temporally and spatially extensive. Such data sets on large river remain regrettably rare, but where they have been collected they are providing important insights into large river structure and function. The increasing availability of these data sets increase, and ongoing improvement in statistical and technological capabilities, may have created new opportunities for synthesis and understanding of large river ecosystems. This session will seek to build connections between the rivers for which such data sets are available, synthesize what has been learned about large-rivers from large data sets, look for emergent findings, and explore ways in which data sets from contrasting rivers and complementary temporal scales may be used to further our understanding of large-river ecology.

Pending/Potential Submissions

Stephen Winter (USFWS): Draw Downs on Large Rivers
David Potter (USACE): Upper Mississippi River Restoration
Roger Haro (UW-L): Training the Next Generation of River Scientists: Building an International and Interdisciplinary Curriculum

Rivers and Watershed—Making the Connections between Modelling, Ecology, and Water
Hydrologic processes fundamentally influence the high productivity characteristics of river floodplain ecosystems and affect numerous physical, biological, and chemical conditions. Engineers, scientists, biologists, and ecologists need to develop a better understanding of these complex interactions for effective resource management and river restoration. This session will highlight new ways of making these connections using innovative hydrodynamic modeling, water-quality, and hydroinformatics tools.