Report and Recommendations of the Instructional Academic Staff Committee

March 25, 2007

 

 

Committee Vision and Guiding Principles:

             The Instructional Academic Staff (IAS) Committee recognizes Instructional Academic Staff as a viable career option in which an IAS colleague is a valued member of the campus community and should be rewarded for his/her accomplishments.  Throughout all of its discussions, the IAS committee has operated under its guiding principle that any IAS policy should not benefit one sector of IAS, while disadvantaging another. 

The recommendations for IAS policies have been, and will continue to be, based on the idea that these policies should:

·        be equitable for IAS in all departments in the university

·        recognize and reward the unique contributions of IAS to our programs/departments without being overly prescriptive

·        provide a viable career ladder

·        be acceptable to IAS and faculty alike

·        require IAS participation in the promotion process

·        ensure that the career progression process is rigorous, yet achievable

·        provide flexibility for departments to customize as they desire.

 

 

Updates on Recommendations Approved by Faculty Senate in 2006:

 

On March 23, 2006, the Faculty Senate approved four recommendations regarding the adoption of two title series for IAS and a set of general policies and criteria for career progression, both of which were to be implemented in Fall 2007.   (The IAS Committee chose not to put forward a recommendation regarding IAS workload, choosing instead, to continue to work with this issue during the 2006-07 AY.)  All four recommendations were forwarded to Chancellor Hastad.  On May 25, 2006, Chancellor Hastad approved the titling and career progression policies with the following caveat.  “I approve the above recommendation on career progression in full with implementation to occur when an acceptable recommendation of a workload policy for Instructional Academic Staff is forwarded from Faculty Senate and approved by the Chancellor.”

Throughout the summer and into the fall semester, department chairs and deans worked to review a portion of IAS to ensure that the individual’s title reflected his/her job description and current duties.   Some positions were also reviewed with the possibility of offering longer contracts.  Tables 1 and 2 compare title use and contract information from 2005-6 and 2006-7 academic years.

 

 

Table 1.   Comparison of IAS Titles from 2005-06 and 2006-07

                SPRING 2006 DATA

 

 

                SPRING 2007 DATA

 

Clinical Instructor

0

 

Clinical Instructor

0

Clinical Assistant Professor

5

 

Clinical Assistant Professor

11

Clinical Associate Professor

1

 

Clinical Associate Professor

1

Clinical Professor

0

 

Clinical Professor

0

Clinical Distinguished Professor

0

 

Clinical Distinguished Professor

0

Total Clinical Professor Title Series

6

 

Total Clinical Professor Title Series

12

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Lecturer

63

 

Associate Lecturer

54

Lecturer

88

 

Lecturer

83

Senior Lecturer

1

 

Senior Lecturer

8

Distinguished Lecturer

0

 

Distinguished Lecturer

0

Total Lecturer Title Series

152

 

Total Lecturer Title Series

145

 

 

 

 

 

Total Instructional Academic Staff

158

 

Total Instructional Academic Staff

157

 

 

Table 2.  Comparison of IAS Contract Length from 2005-06 and 2006-07

 

FALL  2006 DATA

 

 

FALL 2007 DATA

 

CBA

CLS

SAH

Total

 

 

CBA

CLS

SAH

Total

Full-Time

6

37

35

78

 

Full-Time

10

39

39

88

Part-Time

10

53

26

89

 

Part-Time

12

44

25

81

Total

16

90

61

167

 

Total

22

83

64

169

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semester

10

44

16

70

 

Semester

12

39

13

64

1-year

6

43

42

91

 

1-year

5

42

39

86

Multi-year

0

3

3

6

 

Multi-year

5

2

12

19

Total

16

90

61

167

 

Total

22

83

64

169

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Six IAS were known to hold multi-year contracts in 2005-6.

 

 

 

 

 

The total may have been higher, but could not be calculated as

 

 

 

 

 

only four IAS held contracts that did not terminate in May 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006-7 Committee Charge:

 

In addition to its normal duties, the committee was asked to consider and report on the following special charges:

  • Address the process of career progression, including the make-up of a career progression committee, timeline for submission of materials, contents of a career progression portfolio, etc.
  • Investigate IAS contracts, specifically with regard to contact length, wording, type, etc.
  • Develop a mentoring program for IAS.
  • Continue to work in conjunction with Human Resources to update IAS about any new policies/procedures.

 

 

Career Progression:

 

            The General Policies and Procedures for Career Progression have been altered from the original format in which they were approved by Faculty Senate last spring.   Several areas of concern were addressed; such as, IAS with dual department appointments, process for and lack of a system for tracking of semesters of teaching for eligibility and IAS who receive release time for required duties such as program directors, lab coordinators and coaches.  In addition, the committee has added some detail of the career progression process (e.g., deadlines, committee makeup, contents of CP packet).  A salary bump of $1000 for successful candidates was added.  The updated General Policies, Procedures and Criteria for IAS Career Progression has been attached as Appendix A.

            Recommendation #1:  The IAS Committee recommends the adoption of the General Policies, Procedures and Criteria for IAS Career Progression outlined in Appendix A for implementation beginning in Fall 2007.

            Recommendation #2:  The IAS committee recommends that Human Resources be encouraged to pursue an electronic method to both track IAS semesters of teaching and to notify them when they become eligible to apply for career progression.

 

Workload:

 

            The Instructional Academic Staff Workload Policy is similar to the Faculty Workload Policy in both its verbiage and its format.  For IAS, Total Workload is defined as a standard minimum teaching load (12 contact hours) plus additional workload equivalency activities (equivalent to 3 contact hours).   This format was developed to accommodate the diverse nature of IAS appointments across and within colleges and departments.  The workload policy has been attached to this report as Appendix B.  Appendix C was developed to illustrate the extremely diverse nature of how IAS are utilized across campus and enforce the need for a broad workload policy.

            Recommendation #3:  The IAS Committee recommends that adoption of the Instructional Academic Staff Workload Policy as stated in Appendix B for implementation beginning Fall 2007

 

Enhanced Communication Tools:

 

In Spring 2006, approximately one-third of all general education courses at UW-L were taught by IAS.  At UW-L, IAS taught 36,879.5 Student Contact Hours (SCnH) during Spring 2006.  This equates to 345.7 SCnH/FTE or an average of 14.6 contact hours per IAS.  The practice of increasing the number of IAS in the classroom is not a new phenomenon, nor is it limited to UW-L.  All across UW-System, schools have seen a steady increase of IAS over the past 20 years.

 

IAS as Percent of Total Instructional Workforce at UW-L

 

 

 

 

 

1987-88*

1997-98*

2006-07^

Total Instructional  FTE

359

327

454

# IAS

59

67

157

# Ranked Faculty

308

260

297

% IAS

14.30%

20.40%

34.60%

% Ranked Faculty

85.70%

79.60%

65.40%

 

 

 

 

*"Teaching Academic Staff in the UW System:  a UWS Board of Regents 21st

Century Study"  Accepted by BOR on June 5, 1998.

 

^ Data from Human Resources, February 22, 2007.

 

 

 

In light of recent data on the increasing proportional role of instructional academic staff among the instructional workforce at UW-L, the IAS Committee believes that it is more important than ever to provide meaningful orientation, on-going support in the form of mentoring, and enhanced communication tools for instructional academic staff.  The following are recommended procedures for accomplishing these goals.

 

1.      Orientation.  Currently, there is no formal orientation process for new IAS and IAS are not invited to the new faculty orientation – with the exception of the benefits session.  It is equally important for IAS and faculty to receive information on issues ranging from preparing to teach their first class to understanding safety regulations and parking procedures.  Obviously, there are aspects of employment that are of interest to faculty only; such as promotion, tenure and research expectation.  At the same time, there are also aspects of employment that are of interest to IAS only; such as career progression, contract issues, IDPs, and definitions of professional development.

 

Recommendation #4:  The IAS Committee recommends that all new instructional academic staff be involved in orientation sessions.  We recommend that the Provost’s office coordinate this orientation and work with the IAS Liaison to determine whether it would be more beneficial to hold a joint session for both faculty and IAS with breakout sessions for IAS- and Faculty-focused issues or if a completely new and separate orientation session for IAS should be developed. 

We further recommend that ALL IAS, regardless of the start date of their employment, be invited to attend the Fall orientation.  Finally, we recommend that a smaller orientation be held at the start of the Spring semester for those IAS who are hired as new employees for Spring.

Recommendation #5: The IAS Committee recommends that departments be encouraged to meet with new IAS in order to clarify expectations about the employee’s role in the department.  All new IAS should receive a copy of departmental by-laws and should be informed in writing about the details of how they will be evaluated, and the normal timeline for the evaluation procedures

 

2.      Mentoring.  

Recommendation #6:  Because the IAS Committee is aware of the benefits of both external (to the department) and internal mentors for IAS, we recommend the following:

·        Each new IAS employee should be encouraged to select an initial external mentor. (Note:  The IAS committee plans to provide a list of persons willing and qualified to serve as mentors and is developing a brochure to both inform IAS of the existence and advantages of the mentor system and to recruit current IAS and faculty to act as mentors.)

·        The first task of the new mentor should be to review, with his or her mentee, department by-laws and the Faculty Senate guidelines regarding career progression.

·        Once such contact is established, IAS employees are encouraged to continue to seek mentoring from the external mentor, a mentor within the department, or both, based on the individual’s needs.  Departments are encouraged to support the role of mentoring in the professional development of IAS employees.

 

3.      Enhanced Communication Tools.  As new IAS policies and procedures are being rapidly developed and implemented, it is essential that some sort of communication network be implemented concurrently to ensure that IAS are aware of their rights and responsibilities.

 

Recommendation #7:  The IAS Committee recommends that an IAS website be developed to aid in dissemination of information to this sector of the instructional workforce.  This website could be attached to the IAS Committee page on the Faculty Senate website.  It would contain information about events pertinent to IAS, an FAQ section to be modified periodically, links to UW-System policy information and UW-L Human Resources for information regarding titling and career progression policy, etc.

 

Recommendation #8:  The IAS Committee recommends the creation of an IAS Committee Liaison position.  This person would be responsible for working with the Provost’s office to establish an IAS Orientation process, organizing and attending the IAS orientation sessions, organizing (in cooperation with Human Resources) a career progression informational meeting in the Fall to aid potential IAS in their preparation for the career progression process, organize the IAS mentor system, and maintain the IAS webpage.  The Committee recommends that this be a continuing position with would be staffed through release time or a small stipend.

 

 

Review of Contracts:

           

The IAS Committee has spent some time investigating the options available for contract type, length and language.  The Committee will continue to work on this issue in cooperation with the Provost’s Office and Human Resources to determine the feasibility of various contract options.  No recommendations are being brought forward at this time.

 

2007-08 Agenda:

            The IAS Committee plans to address the issue of contracts (length, wording, type) during the next academic year.  The IAS Committee recognizes that an appeals process will be essential as the policies for titling, career progression and workload are put into action.  The IAS Committee plans to investigate the appeals processes that are currently in place to determine if a current process already exists to address this subject, if a current process could be altered to include IAS appeals, or if an entirely new structure is necessary.  

 

Respectfully submitted by the IAS Committee members,

Kerrie Hoar (chair), IAS in Biology

Suzanne Anglehart, IAS in Microbiology

Jodi Vandenberg-Dave, faculty in Women Studies

Peggy Denton, faculty and chair in Health Professions

Michael Durnin, IAS in Exercise & Sport Science

Barbara Gander, IAS in Education Studies

Glenn Knowles, faculty in Economics

Sandra Koster, IAS in Chemistry

Don Socha, faculty and chair in Modern Languages