Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Minutes
October 8, 2002

Members Present:   Ronald Glass, Donald Socha, Mitchell Stone, Carol Angell, Travis McBride, Adrienne Loh, Andrew Matchett, Brian Finnigan, Mary Heim, Nick Osborne

 Members Absent:    Jennifer Williams-Terpstra, Sharon Casey (exc), Robert Klindworth, Dean Wilder, Jamie Lee Bergum (exc)

 Consultants:            Emily Johnson, Carla Burkhardt, R. Daniel Duquette, Diane Schumacher

Guests:                   Kathryn Hollon, Sandy Keller, Guy Herling, Betsy Morgan, Carol McCoy, Al Gedicks, Mike Winfrey
 

1. M/S/P to approve minutes of September 10, 2002.

2. Mary Heim and Nick Osborne were introduced to the committee as the Student Association representatives.

3. Second Readings – None.

4. First Readings:  

Proposal #4, ERS/SOC 363, American Indians and the Environment, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  This course introduces students to American Indian environmental issues.  Topics include treaty-based hunting, fishing and gathering rights, air and water quality regulatory authority, environmental racism, toxic and nuclear waste disposal on Indian lands, mining and hydroelectric dams, sacred sites, and Indian vs. Western perceptions of the environment.  Special attention will be given to current environmental controversies in Wisconsin Indian country.  Prerequisites: One of the following: ERS 100, ERS 253, ERS 343, SOC 225, SOC 328, EFN 205.  Offered every third semester.

This course will be elective in ERS minor, SOC major and minor.

M/S/P to waive the second reading and approve the proposal  

Proposal #5, Psychology Major and Minor, changing number of electives required for Categories VI, VIII and minor in Teacher Certification programs, effective Spring 2003.  

Psychology Major

F.      Category VI: Advanced Experimental and Biopsychology (at least two courses required) PSY 334, 335, 430, 435, 437, 438.  

G.     Category VIII: Elective Credit.  Six additional credits from psychology courses listed below or from additional credits taken from categories three through seven: PSY 107, 200, 205, 225, 259, 280, 285, 301, 305, 313, 317, 318, 320, 330, 333, 336, 347, 370, 376, 382, 390, 395, 401, 403, 404, 410, 417, 420, 426, 436, 441, 444, 452, 461, 488, 489.

Psychology Minor

(Teacher Certification Programs) – 25 credits, including PSY 100, 231, 232, 304, 335 or 435, and twelve credits of electives excluding PSY 212.  Students may not receive credit for both PSY 210 and 212.

PSY 309, Volunteer Experience in Psychology, 1 credit, title, course description, prerequisites, effective Spring 2003.  This course provides students with opportunities to gain practical experience through interaction with a variety of age groups.  This supervised fieldwork requires 30 hours on site per semester.  Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210.  Repeatable for credit – maximum 2.  Pass/Fail grading.

PSY 450, Fieldwork Experience in Psychology: Undergraduate Internship, 1-3 credits, title, prerequisites, effective Spring 2003.  Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210, overall GPA of 2.30 (minimum of 60 credits).  No more than three credits may be applied to a major in psychology.  Consent of instructor required.  Students may be required to complete a background check. 

PSY 285, Culture and Mental Health: An Applied Perspective, 3 credits, course description, Spring 2003.  This course provides an examination of the relationship between culture and mental health.  Specific attention is given to the impact of racism, prejudice, and minority status on the lives of various American minority groups and how the effects of these factors reveal themselves within a mental health framework.  An eclectic, multidisciplinary approach that draws from clinical and social psychology, as well as sociology, is utilized.  Prerequisites: PSY 100 and sophomore standing (minimum 30 credits).

PSY 308, Research Apprenticeship, 1-2 credits, prerequisites, course description, effective Spring 2003.  This course offers research experience under the supervision of a faculty member.  The student will assist a faculty member in any phase of the research process including literature searches, formulation of instruments, pilot studies, data collection, data coding and computer analysis.  Prerequisites: PSY 231 and 232 and departmental approval (minimum of 60 credits).  Pass/Fail grading.  Repeatable for credit - maximum 4.

PSY 310, Child Development, 3 credits, course description, effective Spring 2003.  This course focuses on basic principles, theories and research in human provides development from conception through middle childhood.  Topics include physical, cognitive, language, social-emotional and personality development.  Both the biological/genetic (nature) and the environmental (nurture) influences on development will be examined within each developmental area.  Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210, or PSY 212.

PSY 370, Educational Psychology, 3 credits, prerequisites, course description, effective Spring 2003.  This course addresses the application of psychological principles, procedures and practices to school learning.  Theoretical principles of learning, readiness, motivation, transfer of training, individual differences, and evaluation will be discussed.  Prerequisites: (PSY 100 and 210) OR (PSY 212 AND concurrent or previous enrollment one of the following: EFN 210/C-I 211 or SHE 210 or ESS 225/226).  

PSY 320, Human Motivation, 3 credits, prerequisites, effective Spring 2003.  Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210.  

PSY 347, Empathetic Listening, 3 credits, prerequisites, effective Spring 2003.   Prerequisites: PSY 100 and minimum of 45 credits.  

PSY 420/520, Advanced Research Methods, 3 credits, prerequisites, effective Spring 2003.  Prerequisites: PSY 100, 210, 231, 232; MTH 205 or 250.  Offered Semester II.

PSY 451/551, Psychological Measurement, 3 credits, prerequisites, effective Spring 2003.  Prerequisites: PSY 100, MTH 205 or 250, PSY 231 and 232.

 

 


The changes in 309 and 450 bring the language of those courses in line with national standards.   320, 347, 420, 451 prerequisite changes make it possible for the computer to check them during registration.

M/S/P to waive the second reading and approve the proposal.  PSY 285, Culture and Mental Health: An Applied Perspective will need to go to General Education Committee.

Proposal #6, Prefix Change, change prefix from MLS to CLI on 390, 395, 410, 420, 435, 450, 455, 460, 465, 470, 495, 496, and 499.

Clinical Laboratory Science Major, change in credits, title, required courses, electives.

Clinical Laboratory Science Major (College of Science and Allied Health)

See College of Science and Allied Health, p. 79, for additional information and application procedures.

Pre-professional requirements (55-60 credits):  Required for admission to the professional curriculum (43-46 credits): BIO 105, 306, 312, 313, CHM 103, 104, 300 (or CHM 303, 304, and 305).

Additional pre-professional requirements (12-14 credits): MIC 406, 407, CHM 325, (or CHM 417 and 418)

The pre-professional curriculum satisfies the College of Science and Allied Health core requirements.

Professional curriculum (43-46 credits)  

Pre-clinical phase (12-14 credits, on campus): CLI 390, 395, 410, 420, 435, 440 (or BIO 406)
Clinical phase (32 credits, at accredited hospital program): CLI 450, 455, 460, 465, 470, 480, 499
Additional recommended electives:  CLI 200, C-S 101, BIO 406, BIO 413, BIO 424, BIO 435/436, BIO 466, MIC 416, MIC 420/421, CLI 495, CLI 496.  

The Clinical Laboratory Science major incorporates a significant amount of writing throughout the required core courses instead of identifying particular courses as writing emphasis courses.  Students who complete the Clinical Laboratory Science major will fulfill the University writing emphasis requirement through the Clinical Laboratory Science Writing-in-the-Major Program.

CLI 200, Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science, 2 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.   An introductory course designed for students who are interested in a profession in clinical laboratory science.  Through lectures, laboratory sessions and experiences in a clinical laboratory, students will develop an understanding for the critical role they will play in the health care arena as a clinical laboratory practitioner.  The course will introduce the students to the technical and clinical functions of the profession as well as to the professional aspects of clinical laboratory science.  An introduction to the profession, basic laboratory math, medical terminology, and basic physiology and bodily functions as they are evaluated in the clinical laboratory will be the basis of the course.  Lect. 1, Lab. 2.  Offered Sem. II. 

MLS 380, Professional Issues in Clinical Laboratory Science, 2 credits, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

CLI 395, Bodily Fluids, 2 credits, course prefix and scope of course (replaces MLS 395), effective Fall 2003.   This course introduces the student to the concepts related to the formation, distribution, and function of body fluids and their chemical, physical, and cellular composition in health and disease.  The laboratory focuses on performing and interpreting results of clinical laboratory procedures related to the formation of body fluids and their chemical, physical, and cellular composition in health and disease.  Prerequisite: Admission to the CLS program.  Lect. 1, Lab. 3.  Offered Sem. I.

MLS 400, Clinical Immunology, 3 credits, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

MLS 405, Clinical Chemistry, 4 credits, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

CLI 410, Clinical Hematology, 3 credits, course prefix, scope of course (replaces MLS 410), and course description, effective Fall 2003.  Introductory course in hematology which examines normal hematologic physiology, cellular development, and hemostasis in the human.  Introduction to pathophysiology, with emphasis on clinical and laboratory evaluation of hematologic status.  Theory and background of laboratory procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic and other diseases are included.  Emphasis on peripherial blood cell morphology, hematopoiesis, maturation, and kinetics.  Pathophysiology of hematologic disorders, including anemias and hematologic malignancies are explored.  Manual laboratory techniques as well as instrumentation will be included in the laboratory portion.  Complete blood counts, correlation of automated and manual differentials and routine coagulation testing will also be performed.  Prerequisite: Admission to the CLS program and CLI 390.  Lect. 2, Lab. 3.  Offered Sem. II.  

MLS 415, Diagnostic Medical Microbiology, 5 credits, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

MLS 425, Molecular Pathology, 3 credits, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

MLS 449, Clinical Correlations I, 2 credits, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

CLI 450, Clinical Chemistry, 6 credits, course prefix, scope of course (replaces MLS 405 and 450), prerequisites, and course description, effective Fall 2003.  This course focuses on chemical analysis performed in the clinical laboratory.  The correlation between the organ systems, the clinical laboratory procedures, and human disease states is presented.  Discussion of areas unique to clinical chemistry laboratory related to evaluation and validity of test results is emphasized.  Laboratory rotation applies the principles of clinical chemistry and their relationship to the performance of analytical procedures and management of the clinical chemistry laboratory.  Prerequisites: Admission to the CLS program, CLI 390, and acceptance to a hospital NAACLS accredited CLS program.

CLI 455, Clinical Hematology/Hemostasis, 6 credits, course prefix, scope of course (replaces MLS 455), prerequisites, and course description, effective Fall 2003.  Course extends concepts and skills learned in CLI 395 and CLI 410.  Advanced theory in hematology to include abnormal and malignant processes, applications of flow cytometry and special stains, the diagnosis and classification of leukemias, troubleshooting instrumentation and interpretation of scatterplots.  Hemostasis concepts, selection of appropriate tests and interpretation of results and diagnosis of coagulation disorder as well as advanced body fluid morphology will be covered.  Students will gain experience processing and analyzing patient specimens with a wide variety of complex procedures as well as instrumentation.  Students will also expand their identification and diagnostic skills on microscopic analysis of hematology and body fluid specimens.  Prerequisites: Admission to the CLS program, CLI 395; 410 and acceptance to a hospital NAACLS accredited CLS program.

CLI 460, Clinical Immunohematology, 6 credits, course prefix (replaces MLS 460), prerequisites, and course description, effective Fall 2003.  Course extends concepts and skills acquired in CLI 420.  Performance and interpretative skills in ABO and Rh typing, antibody detection and identification techniques, hemolytic disease problems, quality assurance management, solving patient’s blood compatibility problems, histocompatibility techniques, and selection of appropriate blood products for various bleeding disorders will be expanded.  Prerequisites: Admission to the CLS program, CLI 420, and acceptance to a hospital NAACLS accredited CLS program.

CLI 465, Clinical Immunology, 2 credits, course prefix, scope of course (replaces MLS 400 and 465), prerequisites, and course description, effective Fall 2003.  Course in the application of immunologic and serologic techniques used for the specific diagnosis of immunodeficiency diseases, malignances of the immune system, autoimmune disorders, hypersensitivity states and infection by specific microbial pathogens.  Laboratory rotation applies concepts from lecture.  Experience is gained in clinical immunological techniques, methods, and management of antigen-antibody reactions and identify the relationship to disease states.  The rotation also includes the fundamentals of HLA testing and Flow Cytometry techniques with interpretation of results.  Prerequisites: Admission to the CLS program and acceptance to a hospital NAACLS accredited CLS program.

CLI 470, Diagnostic Microbiology, 8 credits, course prefix, scope of course, prerequisites, and course description, effective Fall 2003.  Course provides an in depth study of the major groups of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses and their relationship to human disease.  Topics include clinical signs and symptoms of these diseases, proper method of collecting, transporting, and processing appropriate clinical specimens, modes of transmission, and state of the art laboratory methods used for the identification of these pathogens and diagnosis of the diseases they cause.  Principles of theory will be applied in rotation.  Rotation provides students with opportunities to process a variety of patient specimens and gain experience with a wide variety of state-of-the-art procedures and equipment for the isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, protozoa, helminths, and viruses.  Molecular diagnostic procedures will also be employed.  Prerequisites: Admission to the CLS program, CLI 440, and acceptance to a hospital NAACLS accredited CLS program.

MLS 475, Advanced Applications, 1 credit, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

CLI 480, Laboratory Management and Education, 2 credits, course prefix (previously MLS 430), title, effective Fall 2003.  A course designed to introduce the clinical laboratory science student to the principles of laboratory administration.  The seminar-format course will focus on human resource management, financial management, operations management and education methodologies appropriate for the supervisor and laboratory and multidisciplinary manager.  Prerequisites: Admission to the CLS program and acceptance to a hospital NAACLS accredited program.

MLS 492, Clinical Correlations II, 2 credits, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

MLS 493, Clinical Correlations III, 2 credits, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.  

The Clinical Laboratory Science program has been revised from the former Medical Laboratory Science program.  Previously, the university held the program accreditation.  Now the participating hospitals will hold the accreditation.  Students will spend 9 months during their senior year taking clinical courses at the hospitals.

M/S/P to waive the second reading and approve the proposal, pending the receipt and approval of CLI 440.

5. Old Business

   It was recommended that UCC policies and the curriculum preparation guide be placed on the Web.  This would allow departments to access directions on how to fill out the LX forms when the department is in the process of completing the LX forms.  It was suggested that samples of completed LX forms be placed on the Web as well for extra assistance.

The Undergraduate Curriculum Committee has no special charge this year.  UCC will continue to operate as it has been.

6.         New Business – None

DEAN APPROVED STUDENT PETITIONS

            CBA:    SOC 370 for SOC 225 to fulfill Gen Ed requirement.

  

The meeting adjourned at 5:06 p.m.  The next UCC meeting is October 22, 2002.

   

Diane L. Schumacher

UCC Secretary