Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Minutes
April 22, 2003 

Members Present:                Glass, Kelly, McBride, Klindworth, Loh, Matchett, Wilder, Finnegan, Hunt, Kastantin

 

Members Absent:                Socha, Mc Dougal, Bergum, Heim, Osborne

 

Consultants:                         E. Johnson, Dittman, Burkhardt, Schumacher

 

Guests:                                   Saeger, Venneman, Taylor, Tollefson, Rudrud

 

1.  M/S/P to approve minutes of April 8, 2003.

 

2.  Second Readings: None

 

3.  First Readings:

 

Proposal #50 Addition of two new music courses, change in program requirements for General Music Emphasis and Choral Music Emphasis effective Fall 2003

MUS 249, Piano Sight-Reading, 1 cr.  (new course), This course is intensely focused on reading piano music at sight.  While the majority of the course will be providing the opportunities to simply read/perform new music at sight, strategies for improving initial sightreading skills will also be given on a regular basis. Prerequisite: MUS 149; offered Sem. I.

 

MUS 349, Vocal Accompanying, 1 cr.  (new course), Instruction and practical experience in vocal accompanying.  Topics include score reading, rehearsal techniques, simplifying scores, improving interpretation in performance.  Prerequisite: MUS 249; offered Sem. II.

 

Music Major-General Music Emphasis:  (K-12 teaching licensure) – 62 credits, including music core requirements; MUS 149, 211, 212, 213, 263, 308, 321, 322; C-I 307, 371; applied music (see list on p. 213): six credits must include two credits at 300 level, (any voice or instrument), two credits of MUS 243 or 343; MUS 341 or 349; large ensembles: six credits to be selected from MUS 151, 153, 155, 157, 159, 163, 167; small ensembles: two credits; electives: two credits.

 

Choral Music Emphasis: (K-12 teaching licensure) – 61 credits, including music core requirements; MUS 149, 349, 211, 212, 213, 263, 318, 321, 322; C-I 306; applied music: six credits including MUS 343 (two credits), and MUS 443; large ensembles: six credits to be chosen from MUS 153, 157, 159, 167 (two credits must be from MUS 153 and/or 167): small ensembles: two credits: electives: five credits.

 

The changes to the emphasis, while retroactive, are intended to provide flexibility for students, not to disadvantage any students.  M/S/P to approve the proposal on the first reading.

 

Proposal #51, Medical Dosimetry Certificate Program, (effective Fall 2003)

This certificate programs is designed for the certified Radiation therapist to continue his/her education in the specialized field of medical dosimetry. “The medical dosimetrist is a member of the radiation oncology team who has knowledge of the overall characteristics and clinical relevance of radiation oncology treatment machines and equipment, is cognizant of procedures commonly used in brachytherapy and has the education and expertise necessary to generate radiation dose distributions and dose calculations in collaboration with the medical physicist and radiation oncologist” (from the A.A.M.D.)  Prerequisites for the program include college level mathematics (applied mathematics or pre-calculus level) and introduction to computers.  Students must carry current A.R.R.T. certification in Radiation Therapy and must apply to the program for admission.  This program utilizes primarily Web-based instruction with some on campus “intensive” sessions.  The clinical practicum courses are taken at affiliated radiation oncology departments and are approximately 30 hours per week.  The program is set up by levels, which in most cases are scheduled in semester or summer terms.

The required courses include:

First Level (May be taken before formal admission into the program and are asynchronous Web-based courses.  Students may also petition to test out of these courses)

DOS 190 (1 credit) Advanced Radiologic Imaging for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 200 (1 credit) Production of Teletherapy Radiation for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 210 (1 credit) Fundamentals of Radiation Safety for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 220 (2 credits) Radiobiology for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 230 (2 credits) Physics Fundamentals for Radiation Dosimetrists

Second Level (Students must be accepted into the program. These Fall courses are synchronous Web-based courses with initial intensive on-campus sessions)

DOS 240 (1 credit) Professional Issues for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 250 (2 credits) Anatomy for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 260 (2 credits) Introduction to Dose Calculations

Third Level (Spring courses taught in synchronous Web-based format and clinical)

DOS 270 (2 credits) Introduction to Teletherapy Treatment Planning

DOS 280 (3 credits) Fundamental of Clinical Oncology for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 290 (3 credits) Dosimetry and Instrumentation in Radiation Oncology

DOS 400 (4 credits) Dosimetry Clinical Practicum I

Fourth Level (Summer courses taught in synchronous Web-based format and clinical)

DOS 310 (2 credits) Brachytherapy for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 320 (2 credits) Brachytherapy Treatment Planning

DOS 410 (3 credits) Dosimetry Clinical Practicum II

Fifth Level (Fall courses taught in synchronous Web-based format and clinical)

DOS 330 (1 credit) Simulation for Medical Dosimetrists

DOS 340 (2 credits) Conformal Treatment Planning

DOS 350 (1 credit) Stereotactic Radiosurgery Planning

DOS 360 (1 credit) Dosimetric Quality Assurance

DOS 420 (4 credits) Dosimetry Clinical Practicum III

Elective course after completion of the certificate program may be taken by others upon consent of program director: DOS 370 (1 credit) Seminar in medical dosimetry

 

 

DOS 190, Advanced Radiologic Imaging for Medical Dosimetrists, 1 cr.  (new course),  This course reviews production of medical images with radiographic equipment as well as ultrasound, MRI and radionuclide scans.  Prerequisite: Certification as a radiation therapist; Self-paced Web course.

 

DOS 200, Production of Teletherapy Radiation for Medical Dosimetrists, 1 cr. (new course), Production of radiation for treatment purposes is reviewed and discussed, covering x and gamma rays and particles.  Prerequisite: Certification as a radiation therapist; Self-paced Web course.

 

DOS 210, Fundamentals of Radiation Safety for Medical Dosimetrists, 1 cr. (new course), Radiation safety measures are reviewed and updated according to federal and state mandates.  Prerequisite: Certification as a radiation therapist; Self-paced Web course.

 

DOS 220, Radiobiology for Medical Dosimetrists, 2 cr. (new course), This course reviews the effect of radiation on the human body, in the context of radiation treatments.  It particularly focuses on factors affecting the therapeutic ratio.  Prerequisite: Certification as a radiation therapist; Self-paced Web course.

 

DOS 230, Physics Fundamentals for Radiation Dosimetrists, 2 cr. (new course), Fundamental Principles of physics important to the production and use of radiation for treatment purposes are reviewed and expanded.  Prerequisite: Certification as a radiation therapist; Self-paced Web course.

 

DOS 240, Professional Issues for Medical Dosimetrists, 1 cr.  (new course),  This course introduces the student to the professional practice of Dosimetry, including scope and standards of practice, legal and ethical issues.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program; offered Sem. I.

 

DOS 250, Anatomy for Medical Dosimetrists, 2 cr. (new course), Anatomical structure and function which affects treatment planning processes is addressed along with identification of anatomic structures on radiographs, CT and MRI images.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and successful completion or test-out of DOS 190, 200, 210, 220, 230; offered Sem. I.

 

DOS 260, Introduction to Dose Calculations, 2 cr. (new course), This course introduces factors that affect dose delivered in radiation treatments and how these factors are accounted for in dose calculations.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 190, 200, 210, 220, 230; offered Sem. I.

 

DOS 270, Introduction to Teletherapy Treatment Planning, 2 cr. (new course), Methods of best treating various disease sites with single or multiple field arrangements using x-rays and/or elections are discussed.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 260; offered Sem. II.

 

DOS 280, Fundamentals of Clinical Oncology for Medical Dosimetrists, 3 cr. (new course), This course covers cancer in general as well as specific disease sites, their treatment and management of patient care during treatment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 220, 250; offered Sem. II.

 

DOS 290, Dosimetry and Instrumentation in Radiation Oncology, 3 cr. (new course), Dose measurement utilizing a variety of methods is discussed along with appropriate instrumentation. Calibration methods for linear accelerators are also discussed.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 230, 260; offered Sem. II.

 

DOS 310, Brachytherapy for Medical Dosimetrists, 2 cr. (new course), The use of brachytherapy in radiation therapy is addressed.  Characteristics of sources utilized for treatment as well as determination of source activity and dose delivered are included.  Prerequisite Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 270, 280, 290; offered summer session

 

DOS 320, Brachytherapy Treatment Planning, 2 cr. (new course), Methods and instruments utilized to apply brachytherapy treatment planning techniques to clinical treatment situations are discussed.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 270, 280, 290; offered summer session.

 

DOS 330, Simulation for Medical Dosimetrists, 1 cr. (new course), Techniques of simulation of treatment set-ups are reviewed, and advanced methods of virtual simulation are explored.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 190, 280; offered Sem. I.

 

DOS 340 Conformal Treatment Planning, 2 cr. (new course), Advanced planning techniques of conformal radiation therapy including three-dimensional treatment planning and IMRT concepts are presented.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 260, 270; offered Sem. I.

 

DOS 350, Stereotactic Radiosurgery Planning, 1 cr. (new course), Stereotactic radiosurgery techniques utilizing linear accelerator and gamma knife based systems are discussed.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 260, 270; offered Sem. I.

 

DOS 360, Dosimetric Quality Assurance, 1 cr. (new course), The methods and importance of periodic quality assurance procedures of treatment planning equipment and processes are covered in this course.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 200, 290, 310, 320; offered Sem. I.

 

DOS 370, Seminar in medical dosimetry, 1 cr. (new course), This course offers students an opportunity to practice answering questions and solving problems as they review course material to prepare for the national certification exam. Prerequisite: DOS 360, 420 and consent of instructor;

offered Sem. II.

 

DOS 400, Dosimetry Clinical Practicum I, 4 cr. (new course), Students gain clinical experience in dose calculation and treatment planning methods for standard radiation therapy teletherapy treatments at an affiliated clinical site. Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 240, 250, 260; offered Sem. II.

 

DOS 410, Dosimetry Clinical Practicum II, 3 cr. (new course), Students continue to develop clinical skills at a clinical affiliate, concentrating on more advanced treatment planning and brachytherapy procedures.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 400; offered summer session.

 

DOS 420, Dosimetry Clinical Practicum III, 4 cr. (new course), Students continue to improve their treatment planning and dosimetric skills, concentrating on advanced planning methods and quality assurance techniques.  Prerequisite: Acceptance into medical dosimetry program and DOS 410; offered Sem. I.

 

Medical dosimetry will be a 40-credit certificate program for practicing R-T professionals (bachelor’s degree not required). It is not available to students enrolled in the R-T major. UWL is working with Stanford University on course design, although the accrediting agency governs the curriculum to a large extent.  Much of it will be Web-based; housed at Stanford with no anticipated responsibility for student support by UWL IT services. The only on-campus component is an intensive experience at the beginning of the second level.  Targeted enrollment is 10; the program officially begins in the fall of one year and students will finish in the fall of the following year. The first level of the program is optional for students who may not be prepared at the level necessary to be successful in the program. Those who are better prepared may test out of that level. The local program director, who will be part of the clinical sciences dept, will take full responsibility for the program and working with the students. It was noted that the program structure will mean a very heavy load in the fall for the director. The program has built-in quality assessment through licensure exam pass rates. This is UWL’s first credit certificate program and someone questioned the post-approval review of certificate programs. According to the certificate pilot guidelines, “During July of every year, the dept./unit responsible for the program will submit a report about the certificate program to the APC (copied to the provost)….” The APC can ask for further review if it deems it necessary.

 

This program is a service-based pricing program, which requires approval from UW System. Tuition will be established at a level to make the program self-supporting (the projection is approx. $400/credit). Students will not count in institution enrollment/workload numbers. The committee was positive about the proposal, and acknowledged that some of the questions they had could not be answered until the program had been implemented.

 

M/S/P to approve the proposal on the first reading.

 

 

Proposal #52

CSC 300, Nursing Partnership, 0 cr. (new course) This course is designed for students in the UW Madison-Western Campus nursing program.  It is used to facilitate recordkeeping for students officially enrolled in courses at UW, but using UWL services.  Prerequisite: Admission to the UW-Madison nursing program. Repeatable; not graded.

 

It was noted that is course is being added as an administrative tool to appropriately track UW Madison students that will be using services at the UW LaCrosse campus.  M/S/P to approve the proposal on first reading.

 

4. SAH student petition second reading

                Student requested to have CHM 461, taken fall 2002, count as a second writing emphasis course.

 

Discussion focused on whether an exception should be made for one student or if the class should be identified as writing emphasis retroactively so all students get the benefit of fulfilling a writing requirement. M/S/P to approve the proposal for this one student.(6/2/2)

 

 

 

5. Consent agenda:

CST 110, PUBLIC ORAL COMMUNICATION, 3 cr., revised course title effective Fall 2003

 

M/S/P to approve the proposal.

 

6. Old Business:

a.        UCC Guidelines

 

At the direction of the Senate chair, the criterion relating to the department having adequate infrastructure to support the course/program in the long term was added back into the document. The following questions were discussed: Is UCC in a position to question faculty expertise?(yes-can ask) Will these criteria constrain the committee from asking other questions? (They will guide discussion; not strictly limit it) How will these criteria be used? (to assist faculty proposing courses, and to guide discussion) The criteria expand those items that can be considered for the consent agenda, noting that any member can ask for a full reading.  M/S/P to approve the proposal with amendments. The document will be forwarded to the Senate, and if approved, it will be distributed to dept. chairs, and become part of the UCC policies. Thanks to Adrienne Loh for her work on this.

 

b.        Appropriate "home" for Associate Degree

 

The committee discussed what body should be responsible for overseeing the associate degree. Currently the UCC manages it. Suggestions were narrowed to UCC and Gen Ed Committee. The advantage of the GEC is that there is more consistency because of the Gen Ed director. Changes to the Associate Degree Program would continue to come before the UCC, the same as any other program. M/S/P to recommend to the Faculty Senate that the Associate Degree Program be placed under the oversight of the General Education Committee.

 

 

Meeting adjourned at 6:05 p.m.

 

College approved substitution:

                CBA       ART 106, 3 cr., Special Topics in Art: Drawing Scottish Landscape – Study Abroad, Scotland for an Arts course in General Education

 

 

Submitted,

 

Diane L. Schumacher

UCC Secretary