Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Minutes

 December 14, 2004

 

Members Present:                Beth Cherne, Chris Frye, Ron Glass, Kenny Hunt, Terry Kelly, (chair), Jeff Baggett, Mandy Anderson, Paul Miller, Joseph Kastantin

 

Members Absent:                Ryan Vanloo (student association), Thanh Bui (student association)

                                               

Consultants:                         Amelia Dittman, Diane Schumacher, Emily Johnson, Carla Burkhardt, Chris Bakkum

 

Guests:                                   Mike Jackson, Charles Lee, Paul Reutman, Ken Malay, Jean Hindson, Kim Harbst, Jeri Anibas

 

       1.  Second Readings:

Proposal #18, General History Major, revise required courses, effective fall 2005.

(All colleges) —  40 credits.  Core Requirements-Twelve (12) credits from HIS 210, 230, 240, 250, 285; four (4) credits form HIS 490. Twenty-four (24) credits from the following four categories:

Category I: History of Women, three (3) credits from HIS 301, 305, 315, 364, 370, 371, 372, 386

Category II: U.S. History, Six (6) credits from HIS 303, 308, 309, 310, 313, 316, 317, 319, 320, 321, 323, 324, 325, 336, 343, 345.

Category III: Regional/World Cultural Zones (Asia, Latin America, Europe, Africa), Twelve (12) credits total, including: Asia, three credits from HIS 316, 329, 334, 335, 339; Latin America, three credits from HIS 341, 342, 344, 347, 356; Europe, three credits from HIS 311, 314, 346, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 354, 355; Africa, three credits from HIS 385, 387, 388

Category IV: Classical World/Religions, three credits from HIS 204, 326, 327, 328, 330, 331, 332, 333, 340, 353, 365, 366, 367.

History Major with Regional Emphasis, revise required courses, effective fall 2005.

(All colleges) —  40 credits. Core requirements as listed in the General History major; three (3) credits in INS 350 or an elective 200-300 level HIS course; four (4) credits in HIS 490.  Three (3) credits from each of the following categories and elective course:

Category I: History of Women; Category IV: Classical World/Religions; Elective 200-300 level course.

Twelve (12) credits from one selected area of focus: European focus: HIS 311, 314, 346, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 354, 355; Asian focus: HIS 316, 329, 334, 335, 339; United States focus: HIS 301, 303, 308, 309, 310, 313, 316, 317, 319, 320, 321, 323, 324, 325, 336, 343, 345; Latin American focus: HIS 341, 342, 344, 347, 356; Ancient/Medieval World focus: HIS 204, 327, 328, 329, 331, 332, 333, 340, 346, 353, 365, 366, 367, 372.

             History Minor, revise required courses, effective fall 2005

(All colleges) —  24 credits. With reference to the General History major, six (6) credits in core requirements. Three (3) credits each from Categories I, II, IV; six (6) credits from any two Regional Cultural zones in Category III; one elevtive  HIS 200-300 level course (3 credits). (History minors in teacher certification programs are also required to take HIS 307 for a total of 27 credits.)

Public History Minor, revise required courses, effective fall 2005

(All colleges,) —  24 credits.  The public history minor is an interdisciplinary undergraduate  curriculum which prepares students to practice history outside of the academy, in non-teaching capacities, in the service of select public needs. Required courses: ENG 307 or 308; POL 211 or MGT 308; and HIS 320, 390, 450.

A focus must be selected from one of the following options: Archaeology focus: ARC 195, 250, 300; Public Administration focus: POL 313, 314, 315; Environmental focus: ENV 201, HIS 317, GEO 200.

History Minor with Regional Emphasis, revise required courses, effective fall 2005

(All colleges,) —  24 credits. With reference to the General History major, six (6) credits in core requirements; three (3) credits each from Categories I, IV; one elective 200-300 level course (3 credits); nine (9) credits from one focus selected from Asian, European, United States, Latin American or Ancient/Medieval focus.

(History minors in teacher certification programs are also required to take HIS 307 for a total of

 27 credits.)

Course deletions reflect staffing changes, effective fall 2005

HIS 302, Women, Class, and Identity in United States History, 3 Cr.

HIS 304, Women in Early America: 1607-1890, 3 Cr.

HIS 318, The West in American History, 3 Cr.

HIS 322, The American West in Film and Literature, 3 Cr.

HIS 337, Modern China and Japan, 3 Cr.

HIS 402, American Military History, 3 Cr.

 

M/S/P to approve proposal

 

Proposal #25, Physics Major, revise required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 38 credits, including 32 29 credits of the following core courses: PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, 321, 332, 334, 343, 401 and at least six nine credits from electives numbered higher than PHY 250 or from any AST course.

Physics Major with Computational Physics Emphasis, revise required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 39 credits, including: PHY 103 or 203, PHY 104 or 204, 250, 311, 374, 474 464; C-S 220; and at least one credit of PHY 498 with a computational project; and 14 additional credits including: PHY 302, 303, 321, 332, 334, 343, 401, 1-2 physics courses at the 300/400 level; up to an additional 2 credits of PHY 498 (computational); up to six credits from C-S 270, C-S 340, C-S 351, or MTH 371, MTH 480.

Physics Major with Optics Emphasis, revise required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 40 credits, including: PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, 321, 332, 334, 335, 343, 401, 476; and three credits of PHY 498 with a project in optics and electives in physics at the 300/400 level. (This emphasis is also especially suitable for chemistry students.)

Physics Major with Biomedical Concentration, revise credits, required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 55 56 credits. A minimum of 28 32 credits of Physics, including PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, 334, 335, and at least 11 eight additional credits of electives in physics numbered higher than PHY 250.  A minimum of 21 24 credits outside physics, including the following required courses MTH 145 or 250, 309; CHM 300 (or CHM 303, 304, 305 or CSC H-P 421); BIO 312, 313; and additional electives in biology, chemistry, health professions, mathematics and/or microbiology at the 300/400 level.

Physics Major with Business Concentration, revise required courses, electives

All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 55 credits.  A minimum of 28 credits of Physics, including PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, 334, 335, and at least eight additional credits of electives in physics numbered higher than PHY 250 or from any AST course.  A minimum of 24 credits outside physics, including the following required courses ECO 110, 120; ACC 221, 222; FIN 355; MKT 309; MGT 308, 205; and additional electives in accounting, economics, finance, management and/or marketing at the 300/400 level and physics.

 

In addition to the above changes MGT 408 was taken out of the credits outside of physics and MGT 205 was added

 

Physics Minor, removal of additional wording

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 24 credits, including 13 credits of the following core courses: PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 311 and at least 11 credits from electives numbered higher than PHY 250 or from any AST course. Students also have the option of concentrating their studies in computational physics or optics by choosing their electives appropriately. (This minor is also especially suitable for chemistry, computer science and mathematics students.)

Physics Major with Astronomy Emphasis, revise credits, required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 40 39 credits, including the following 37 credits: AST 155, 156, 362, 363, 466; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 311, 321, 332; and 3 credits from Physics and Astronomy courses at the 300/400 level (excluding PHY 320, 376, 386, 497).  If PHY/AST 498 is chosen, the research must be astronomy related 343, 302, 303 or 401.

Physics Minor with Astronomy Emphasis, revise credits, required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 24 23 credits, including: AST 155, 156, 363; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, and 302 electives from any AST courses. (This minor is also especially suitable for chemistry, computer science and mathematics students.)

 

Dual Degree Program in Engineering and Physics, revise required courses, electives

This is a dual degree program which enables a student to receive both a Bachelor of Science (Physics major) from UW-La Crosse and a Bachelor of Science (Engineering major) from UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Platteville, or the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. The total length of time for both degrees is expected to be five years, with approximately three years at UW-La Crosse (dating from enrollment in MTH 207) and approximately two years at UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Platteville, or the U. of Minnesota. At UW-La Crosse, students must complete a minimum of 85 credits, including the General Education requirements (students are recommended to include ECO 110, and ECO 120 and ECO 336); and CHM 103, 104; C-S 120; MTH 207, 208, 309, 310; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250 and four out of the following seven courses: PHY 302, 303, 311, 321, 332, 334, 335 and 343. 401; plus an additional three credits in PHY 498 or other courses in any area of experimental physicsAdditional courses (such as BIO 105, CHM 104, C-S 120, MTH 250 and/or MTH 353) may be required depending on the specific engineering discipline – be sure to consult the Physics Department dual-degree advisor for details. 

 

Students wishing a dual degree in Chemical Engineering and Physics via this program must also complete CHM 301 an additional specified course (or courses) in chemistry.

 

Students wishing a dual degree in Biomedical Engineering and Physics via this program must complete a minimum of 85 credits at UW-La Crosse, including the General Education requirements (students are recommended to include ECO 110, ECO 120 and ECO 336) and CHM 103, 104; MTH 207, 208, 309, 310; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, and additional specified courses in biology, chemistry, microbiology, mathematics and physics. 

     Students who express interest in the dual degree program will be selected for entrance into the UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Platteville, or U. of Minnesota, Twin Cities portion of the program based on their G.P.A. in all coursework; their G.P.A. in the chemistry, computer science, mathematics, and physics coursework required by the program; and the positive recommendation of the UW-La Crosse Physics Department Chair (or designee). Qualified UW-La Crosse applicants are assured admission in the College of Engineering at UW-Madison or UW-Milwaukee; the College of Engineering, Mathematics & Sciences at UW-Platteville or the Institute of Technology at U. of Minnesota.

     In order to receive the B.S. degree (Physics major) from UW-La Crosse, dual-degree students must also complete the remaining 35 credits (to total a minimum of 120 credits) in engineering at UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Platteville, or U. of Minnesota and transfer these credits to UW-La Crosse. For the typical student, the remaining 35 credits must include at least 15 credits at the 300 level or above and at least 13 credits from the Engineering College or Institute College of Engineering, College of Engineering, Mathematics & Sciences, or the Institute of Technology. This transfer of credits and awarding of the B.S. degree (Physics major) by UW-L can take place as soon as the student earns the necessary credits.

 

Dual Degree Program in Physical Therapy and Physics, 120 cr., new program, effective fall 2005

This is a dual degree program which enables a student to receive both a Bachelor of Science (Physics major with Biomedical Concentration) and a graduate degree (Physical Therapy) from UW-La Crosse.  The total length of time for both degrees is expected to be five and a half years, with approximately three years in the Physics program and approximately two and a half years in the Physical Therapy program.  During the first three years of undergraduate coursework in the UW-L Physics program, students must complete at least 60 credits in biology, chemistry, mathematics, microbiology, and physics to fulfill requirements of the Physics degree (Biomedical Concentration) except for 3 courses fulfilled by physical therapy coursework.  During those same three years, dual-degree students must fulfill UW-L general education courses for the physical therapy program.  Therefore, the undergraduate portion of the program would include a minimum of 85 credits, including the General Education requirements and BIO 105, 312 and 313; CHM 103, 104; MTH 207, 208, 309; MTH 145 or 250; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311 and 334 and 3 credits each of psychology and sociology.  During the first four semesters of physical therapy coursework, the following courses passed with a grade of C or better will fulfill requirements toward the Physics undergraduate major degree and will be subsequently waived from the physical therapy graduate degree requirements for that student: H-P 421; PHY 423 and 483.  Additional coursework taken in the physical therapy program may count toward electives needed for the undergraduate physics degree.  Be sure to consult the Physics Department dual-degree advisor for details regarding this program. 

 

Physics Department Honors Program, revise program requirements                                      

Honors Program

Physics with Honors or Astronomy with Honors

I. Admission

A.    Junior standing

B.    15 credits in physics or astronomy including one 300-level course

C.    3.25 cumulative grade point average in physics/or astronomy courses and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average overall

D.    Recommended by two a faculty members in the Physics Department

II. Program

A.    Completion of a regular major program in physics (which may also include an emphasis or concentration)

B.    PHY 497: Physics and Astronomy Seminar, 1 cr.

C.    PHY 498: Physics and Astronomy Research, 3 cr.

III. Evaluation

A.            A cumulative 3.50 grade point average in physics at the time of graduation and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average overall

B.    Distinguished performance on a project in a relevant research area developed in PHY 498

C.    Presentation of the project developed in PHY 498 to a seminar of faculty and students

IV. Methods of Implementation Admission

A.    Admission

A.    Announcement of program in sophomore-level physics and astronomy classes

B.    Student must submit an application form to the Department Chair that should include

1.     The student’s academic record

2.     The student’s reasons for wishing to participate

3.     The signatures of two a faculty members in physics endorsing the application

B.    Program

1.             PHY 497: Physics and Astronomy Seminar will be offered each semester

2.     PHY 498: Physics and Astronomy Research will be offered each semester

V. Recognition

A.    Honors certificate

B.    Notation on permanent academic record

 

Physics Department Honors Program with Astronomy

Emphasis Requirements

I. Admission

A. Junior standing

B. 15 credits in physics or astronomy including one 300-level course

C. 3.25 cumulative grade point average in physics or astronomy courses and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average

D. Recommended by two faculty members in Physics Department

II. Program

A. Completion of a regular major program in physics with astronomy emphasis

B. AST 497: Physics and Astronomy Seminar, 1 cr.

C. AST 498: Physics and Astronomy Research, 3 cr.

III. Evaluation

A. A cumulative 3.50 grade point average in physics and astronomy at the time of graduation and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average

B. Distinguished performance on a project developed in AST 498

C. Presentation of the project developed in AST 498 to a seminar of faculty and students

IV. Methods of Implementation

A. Admission

1. Announcement of program in sophomore-level physics and astronomy classes

2. Application form

a. Academic record

b. Reasons for wishing to participate

c. Signatures of two faculty members in physics

B. Program

1. AST 497: Physics and Astronomy Seminar will be offered each semester

2. AST 498: Physics and Astronomy Research will be offered each semester

V. Recognition

A. Honors certificate

B. Notation on permanent academic record

All astronomy emphasis majors and minors are strongly encouraged to register for one credit of AST 497 every semester.

       

                Miscellaneous (Note) listed under major, revise information

                All physics majors and minors are strongly encouraged to register for one credit of PHY 497 each

                semester of their first year.

Mathematics majors wishing a double major in mathematics and physics may count PHY 461 (cross-listed with MTH 461) and PHY 470 for credit in both the mathematics major and the physics major.  Mathematics majors may count PHY 461 (cross-listed with MTH 461) and PHY 470 for credit in both the mathematics major and the physics minor.

 

                PHY 104, Fundamental Physics II, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                MTH 150 and PHY 103 or 203 recommended

                or 203 was added to prerequisites 

                PHY 204, General Physics II, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 103 or 203; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 250, Modern Physics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

PHY 104 or 204; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment. PHY 250 and PHY 311 are recommended to be taken concurrently

                PHY 302, Optics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 104 or 204; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 303, Optics Laboratory, 1 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 104 or 204; PHY 311 recommended; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 311, Experimental Physics, 2 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 104 or 204; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment. PHY 250 and PHY 311 are recommended

                to be taken concurrently

                PHY 332, Electrodynamics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 104 or 204; PHY 311 recommended; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 335, Electronics, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 334

                PHY 343, Thermodynamics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 250; MTH 309 or concurrent enrollment; PHY 311 recommended

                PHY 362, Astrophysics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

PHY 250 and 302; AST 155 or AST 156 or permission of instructor. (Cross-listed with AST; may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both

                PHY/AST 363, Astrophysics Lab, 1 cr., revise course description, prerequisites, credits

PHY 104 or 204; MTH 151; AST 155 or AST 156 or permission of instructor. (Cross-listed with AST; may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both

                PHY 423, Biomechanics of Human Movement, 3 cr., revise prerequisites

                PHY 103 or 203; MTH 309; BIO 312

                PHY 432, Advanced Electrodynamics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 332; PHY 301 recommended; MTH 353 or concurrent enrollment

PHY 453/553, Topics in Physics and Astronomy, 1-3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites PHY 104 or 204

                PHY 460, Condensed Matter Physics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 250; MTH 310

                PHY 466, Cosmology and the Structure of the Universe, 3 cr., revise title, course description,                               

                prerequisites

                PHY 250 and 302; MTH 310; AST 156 or permission of the instructor. (Cross-listed with AST;

                may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both.

                PHY 472, Particle Physics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 401; MTH 310

                PHY 476, Advanced Optics, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 302 and 303; PHY 332 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 483, Instrumentation in Biomechanics, 3 cr., revise prerequisites

                PHY 423

                PHY 497, Physics and Astronomy Seminar, 1 cr., revise course description,                 

                repeatable credits and misc. info

                Repeatable for credit to a maximum of four credits-a maximum of two credits can be used to

satisfy elective requirements. Pass/Fail grading. Cross-listed with AST; may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both.

PHY 498, Physics and Astronomy Research, 1-3 cr., revise course description, credits and misc. Info

                PHY 103, Fundamental Physics I, 4 cr., revise course description

                PHY 203, General Physics I, 4 cr., revise course description

                PHY 320, Statics, 3 cr., new course, effective spring 2005

                Principles of statics and free-body diagrams with applications to simple trusses, frames,

and machines.  Includes topics in force/moment vectors, resultants, distributed loads, internal forces in beams, properties of areas, moments of inertia and the laws of friction. Prerequisites: PHY 103 or 203; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment. Offered occasionally.

PHY 334, Electrical Circuits, 3 cr., new course, effective fall

Physical principles underlying modeling of circuit elements and fundamentals of analog electrical circuits are explored through lecture and laboratory. Topics will include the following: current and voltage sources, resistors, I-V characteristics, Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s Laws, capacitors, inductors; Thevenin and Norton theorems; circuits in sinusoidal steady state; diodes, transistors (bipolar junction and field-effect); op-amps; elementary amplifier circuits. Lec. 2 Lab.2.  Prerequisites: PHY 104 or 204; MTH 309 or concurrent enrollment; PHY 311 recommended. Offered Sem II.

                PHY 125, Physics for the Life Sciences, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 321, Classical Mechanics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 374, Computational Physics, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 401, Quantum Mechanics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 470, Advances Quantum Mechanics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 474, Advanced Computational Physics, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                Course descriptions are on file in the Records & Registration office.

M/S/P to approve proposal with minor changes.

 

 

 

2.        First Readings:

Proposal #17, Doctor in Physical Therapy,

New courses, effective Summer 2005

DPT 411/511, Human Gross Anatomy, 6 cr.

A comprehensive consideration of the human anatomy including both neuro-musuculoskeletal components and internal organ systems. Systems included are musculoskeletal, neurological, urogenital, gastrointestinal, skeletal, and cardiopulmonary. The course includes the complete regional dissection of the human cadaver. Biomechanical function, topographic and radiologic correlations, and clinical applications are emphasized. Provides an in-depth understanding of the gross anatomy of the human body through lecture, audiovisual, computer and gross cadaver dissection. Prerequisite: Enrollment in DPT Professional Program. May only earn credit in one of the following: PAS 621, DPT 411/511, or BIO 501.  Offered summer session.

DPT 412/512, Medical Physiology, 4 cr.

Emphasis upon physiological principles directly related to rehabilitation in a physical therapy practice setting and interaction of physiological systems during normal activities and after injury or disease.   DPT students will be enrolled in a one hour per week discussion section. Prerequsite: Enrollment in DPT Professional Program. Offered summer session.

DPT 421/521, Applied Anatomical Assessment, 1 cr.

A course designed to acquaint the student with the clinical significance of finding anatomical landmarks through surface palpation. Prerequsite: Enrollment in DPT Professional Program. Offered summer session.

DPT 431/531, Introduction to Physical Therapy Practice, 2 cr.

Using a seminar format, the learner will be exposed to the multiple roles of the physical therapist as a professional and gain insight into the importance of those roles in the context of today’s health care system using the disablement model.  The student will be introduced to the development of professional behaviors relevant to the practice of physical therapy.  Professional organizations and their relationships to professional practice will also be discussed.  Service learning and clinical role models will utilized for out of class learning.  An overview of documentation and medical records will also be included. Prerequsite: Enrollment in DPT Professional Program. Offered summer session.

DPT 413/513, Biomechanics & Kinesiology of Movement, 3 cr.

The principles and theories of the biomechanics of human motion presented to develop analytical skills to assess normal and abnormal movement. Lec. 2 Lab. 2.  Prerequisite: Enrollment in DPT Professional Program.  Offered Sem I.

DPT 414/514, Functional Neuroanatomy, 3 cr.

This course will provide an understanding of the developmental, structural and neurological bases of normal functional activities.  In lab, the student will learn to locate and recognize typical and atypical structures of the central and peripheral nervous systems on cadaveric specimens, models, and radiographic images.  The student will also practice basic neurological exam techniques.  Normal function of components of the nervous system and the interaction of those components to produce typical motor function will be emphasized.   Potential threats to nervous system development and function and the type of deficit that may be anticipated following such insults will be introduced.  Lec. 2 Lab. 2. Prerequisite: Enrollment in DPT professional curriculum. Offered Sem I.

DPT 415/515, Motor Control, Motor Learning, and Motor Development, 2 cr.

This course will provide a theoretical and research evidence basis for normal and disordered movement via motor control, motor learning, and motor development literature.  Students will formulate a basic understanding of what is known about typical and atypical development, control and learning of movement and how available knowledge applies to motor re-learning and control occurring after a lesion.   These concepts will be discussed with respect to multiple patient populations.  Lec. 1 Lab. 2.  Prerequisites: Enrollment in DPT professional curriculum. Offered Sem I.

DPT 416/516, Physiological Regulation of Exertion and Disease, 2 cr.

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the physiological basis of activity.  The course emphasizes the various changes brought on by exercise to the normal and abnormal physiolgical systems. Prerequisite: Enrollment in DPT professional curriculum. Offered Sem I.

DPT 422/522, Foundations of the Examination Process, 5 cr.

A course designed to instruct the student on techniques to examine patients/clients by obtaining a history from other sources, by performing systems reviews and by selecting and administering culturally appropriate and age-related tests and measures. Lec. 3 Lab. 4.  Prerequisites: Enrollment in DPT professional curriculum. Offered Sem I.

DPT 423/523, Physical Agents, 3 cr.

This course provides an understanding of the physiological basis, scientific rationale for, and clinical application of, thermal, electrophysiology/electrotherapy and electromagnetic physical agents.  Strategies and techniques to manage pain, edema, soft tissue dysfunction, loss of motion and weakness through direct interventions will be covered.  Lec. 2 Lab. 2.  Prerequisites: Enrollment in DPT professional curriculum. Offered Sem I.

 

      M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

Proposal # 28, SPA 427, Spanish Grammar for Teachers, 1 cr., new course, effective spring 2005

A review of selected essential concepts of Spanish grammar with a focus on developing effective strategies for teaching them to beginning Spanish students.  Prerequisites: SPA 303 and SPA 304 and one additional 300-lvel course in Spanish. Offered Sem II.

 

M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

Proposal # 29, PHL 355, Philosophy & Film, 3 cr., new course, effective fall 2005

The registrar suggested the Philosophy department get a letter of approval from the Sociology department due to the fact that they already have film course (SOC 317, Sociology of Film)

 

This was a first reading there will be a second

 

Proposal # 30, Environmental Studies Minor, 24 cr., revise electives

GEO 324, ANT 203, ECO 335, HED 334,487, SOC 314,260, W-S 371, ENG 459 have been taken out of the electives.

M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

Proposal # 31, PHY/AST 155, Solar System Astronomy, 4 cr., revise instructional pattern, course description

An introduction to astronomy as a science, emphasizing patterns in the night sky, our own solar system, and the possibility of life on other worlds.  Throughout the course, comparison of observations with theoretical models will be stressed.  Topics studied include: the size and scale of the solar system relative to the universe; the scientific method; astronomical observations; motions of the Earth, Moon, Sun, and planets; creating a model of the solar system; what we learn about planets from light and gravity; the structure and formation of the solar system; the planets and their moons; comets, asteroids, and meteoroids; and the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe. Recent results, including those from NASA missions, will be incorporated into the course. Crouse listed with AST; may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both.  Lect. 3 Lab. 2. Offered Sem I.

PHY/AST 156, Stars, Galaxies and the Universe, 4 cr., revise title, instructional pattern, course description, and prerequisites

An introduction to astronomy as a science, emphasizing celestial objects beyond our solar system.  Throughout the course, comparison of observations with theoretical models will be stressed.  Topics studied include; the size and scale of the universe; using light and gravity to study the cosmos; the sun, the properties of other stars, lives and deaths of stars, star clusters, black holes, the Milky Way galaxy, dark matter, other galaxies, quasars, Big Bang cosmology, dark energy, and gravitational waves.  Particular emphasis will be placed on recent discoveries. Cross-listed with AST; may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both.  Lec. 3 Lab. 2. Offered Sem II.

This was proposal #27 on the agenda; due to a numbering error it is now #31

M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

3.        Consent agenda: ARC 315, Prairie-Plains Archaeology, 3 cr., this course is being cross-listed with ANT 315.

PHL 230, International Multicultural Philosophy, 3 cr., prerequisite PHL 229 - strongly suggested has been removed from the prerequisites.

 

M/S/P to approve proposal

 

4.        Writing Emphasis appeal—School of Education for Jill Steinhoff

 

M/S/P to approve

 

5.        Old business:  None

6.        New business:  None                                        

     

Meeting adjourned at 5:15 p.m. The next UCC meeting is set for January 25, 2005.  

    Diane Schumacher

    UCC Secretary

 

          Dean-approved General Education student appeals:

          SAH: SAH 105 for HPR 105

          CLS: SCTA 116 Business and Professional Communication UW-River Falls for CST 110
          The English department approved using ENG 440