UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE MINUTES

February 28, 2006

 

 

Members Present:                Angell, Baggett, Frye, Kastantin, McDougal, Miller, Socha, Wood, Wycoff-Horn

Members Absent:                                Kohl

Consultants:                                         Burkhardt, Dittman, Herling, Keller, Schumacher

Guests:                                                   M. Anderson, Duquette, Fisher, S. Krajewski, Martinez, McLean

 

1.             M/S/P to approve minutes of February 14, 2006.

 

2.             Community Health Education, major, credit changes and in required courses and electives. Effective Fall 2006, new catalog only.

55 71 credits in health education and community health education, including HED 205, 320, 335, 345, 425, 437, 469, 472, 473, 474, 477; CHE 240, 340, 350, 440, 441, 491, 498. An additional 6 credits of electives in health education, community health education, school health education, or from another department, at the 300/400 level are to be selected under advisement for exploration and competency development; and 28 credits in interdisciplinary requirements: HPR 105, BIO 103 or 105, CHM 100 or 103, MTH 145, ESS 205 and 206 or BIO 312 and 313, CST 250.

 

                School Health Education (Teaching Certification programs), major, credit changes and in required courses.  Effective Fall 2006, new catalog only. 38-40 33-35 credits in health education and school health education, including HED 205, 335, 345, 408, 409, 425, 439, 469, 472, 474, 475; SHE 210, 252, 310, 312, 402; 3-15 credits student teaching, SHE 403 or 404, 410; plus 3-5 elective credits in HED, SHE or CHE must be approved by program advisor; 31 29-31 credits interdisciplinary requirements: HPR 105, BIO 103 or 105, ESS 205 and 206 or BIO 312 and 313; PSY 212, 370, RDG 328, EFN 205, C-I 492, ERS 100 or HIS 306 or W-S 230 or SOC 225.

 

                School Health Education (Teaching Certification programs), minor, credit changes and in required courses.

31 29 credits in health education and health education, including HED 205, 335, 345, 425, 469, 472, 474, 475; SHE 210, 310, 402, 410; 3-15 credits in student teaching SHE 403 or 404; 17 14 credits in interdisciplinary requirements: HPR 105, BIO 103 or 105, RDG 328, C-I 492.

 

                HED/R-T 320, U.S. Health Care System, new course, 3 credits. (Replaces R-T 340 submitted to UCC on September 13, 2005.) This course provides an overview and a developmental summary of the U.S. Health Care System and its driving forces and offers comparisons to other national health systems. Content includes major elements of the health care system and a consideration of today’s major health policy issues in a historical, economic, and political context. The course will also explore current issues confronting the health care system, raise important concerns and questions related to the different approaches to health care delivery, and identify key ethical issues. Prerequisite: HED 205 or R-T 325 (may be concurrent).

 

                HED 335, Human Ecology and Environmental Health, credits change from 2 to 3, change in course description and content. This course examines the interdisciplinary and global effects of human-environment relationships. Emphasis is placed on the critical nature of the relationship between ecosystem health and human health and well-being. Environmental politics and economics, global disease, and traditional environmental health topics are considered for the purpose of improving the quality of life for all people through the creation of a sustainable society. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or 105, CHM 100 or 103. Offered Sem. I.

 

                HED 425/525, Violence and Injury Prevention, new course, 3 credits.

Participants will review the major forces leading to violent behavior and injury in the United States and globally. Trends over time will be carefully reviewed and analyzed in order to detect risk factors and protective factors. Violence and injury prevention strategies will be reviewed, resulting in the development of prevention and intervention proposals using community-based programming and curriculum development strategies. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Offered Sem. I.

 

                HED 437/537, Theories of Health Behavior, credits changed from 2 to 3, course description modified and prerequisites added. Overview of health behavior through the examination of health behavior theoretical constructs. Emphasis is on the application of behavior change theories and models to facilitate healthy positive behavior changes. Prerequisites: HED 205, CHE 240. Offered occasionally Offered Sem. I.

 

                HED 477/577, Grant seeking in Health, Human Services, and Education Program, credits from 1-3 to 3; change in prerequisites from senior standing to HED 205, CHE 240, 340, 350, or consent of instructor.

 

                CHE 240, Community Health Education Foundations, changes in course description and change to no prerequisites. Community health education is explored as a career option. This course examines the role of community health educators in agencies and organizations that address the health needs of individuals and communities. This course emphasizes a skill-oriented focus and will provide professional preparation for Community Health Education roles and responsibilities. Examination of the role of health educators with regard to the seven responsibility areas will be the foundation of this course. Students will be engaged in critical thinking exercises, experiential learning activities, and professional preparation assignments.  Students learn about the theoretical foundations of health education as applied to program development for individuals, temporary groups, organizations and communities. Students participate in one hour of lecture, one hour of small group lab, and 5 to 8 hours of field experience for approximately 10 weeks. Offered Sem. I.

 

                CHE 491, Senior Seminar in Community Health Education, credits change from 1 to 2, course description.

This seminar is designed to review the areas of responsibility and competencies for health educators, coupled with an overview of the students’ professional preparation, credentialing issues, and professional development opportunities. Through discussion, interaction activities, and project development, students will be prepared to enter into the realistic challenges and opportunities afforded by the Community Health Education Preceptorship and eventual employment experiences. Prerequisite: To be taken during the final semester prior to CHE 498.

 

                CHE 498, Community Health Education Preceptorship, credits change to 1-15 from 1-12.

 

Presenter provided sample schedule as evidence that CHE major can be completed in 4 years. Sociology and Political Science departments were consulted about HED/R-T 320. M/S/P to approve proposal.

 

3.             First Readings:

Exercise and Sport Science Major — Physical Education Teacher Certification (revised from 2/28/06 agenda) Effective for all students entering fall 2005 and beyond (Teacher Certification programs) —   53 60 credits of professional requirements. Required courses: (freshman year) ESS 112, 113**, 115, 117, 121; (sophomore year) ESS 205, 206, 207, 225, 226, 231, 258, 261 (junior year): ESS 201, 302, 303, 310, 321, 322, 325, 326, 367; (senior year) ESS 401, 402, 412, 422, 423, 424; 12 credits of teacher education requirements: C-I 403 student teaching practicum; 15-18 5 credits of statutory requirements: ERS 100* or HIS 306* or SOC 225* or W-S 230*; C-S 101*; PSY 370; EFN 205; and RDG 330. Total credits: 84-87 77.

Note:
Physical education teacher certification majors and minors are required to take BIO 103* or 105* or MIC 100*, and HPR 105*  PSY 212 to meet prerequisite requirements for advanced courses. It is recommended that all incoming freshmen wishing to major in exercise and sport science — physical education teacher certification enroll in ESS 112, 115, 117, and 121 during their first year at UW-L. 

Students should refer to policies identified in the School of Education section on p. 61. These policies apply to students in all teacher certification programs. The School of Education Web site also has more information.

Additional Program Requirements

Admission
Admission to the physical education teacher education (PETE) program is competitive and successful completion of application requirements does not guarantee admission into the PETE program. Students who wish to be considered for acceptance into the program will be evaluated using the following criteria: physical fitness assessment reflection, grade point average in foundation courses (ESS 112, ESS 115, 117 , 225, BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100, HPR 105), 2.75 combined cumulative GPA (including transfer grade points), passage of all parts of the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST), K-12 leadership involvement and reflection, a satisfactory interview with PETE admission committee members, and a background check. Students admitted into the PETE program must maintain a 2.75 grade point average. Approximately thirty students are admitted each semester to the PETE major. Students are allowed to apply for PETE admission twice during their academic career at UW-L. Course substitutions may be authorized by the program director. Curriculum changes may result in a revision of courses and other criteria used as admission requirements.

Retention and Advancement
Students admitted into the PETE program must maintain a 2.75 grade point average.. In order to enroll in student teaching and clinical courses, students must have earned and maintained a 2.75 combined cumulative GPA and a 2.75 GPA in the major, minor, concentration and professional course work.  Students are allowed to apply for PETE admission twice during their academic career at UW-L Passing scores for the PRAXIS II Subject Assessment is required in each certification area prior to entering student teaching.

 Students must have successfully completed all parts of the PPST, earned and maintained a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 and be admitted to teacher education in order to enroll in teacher education courses. In order to enroll in student teaching practicum courses, students must have earned and maintained a 2.75 cumulative GPA and a 2.75 GPA in the major, minor, concentration and professional course work and have an official Praxis II documenting passing scores on Praxis II content tests in the appropriate certification area/discipline.  

·     These courses may apply to the General Education requirements. May substitute BIO 103 for 105. 

**Aquatics and First Aid Certification
 requirement:
Exercise and Sport Science-Teaching majors must enroll in ESS 113 unless they hold one of the following American Red Cross (ARC) certifications: Intermediate Swimmer, Advanced Swimmer, Life-guard Training, or  possess a current Water Safety Instructor (WSI) and American Red Cross First Aid or equivalent agency certification prior to student teaching.

ESS 112, Fundamentals of Movement, changes from 2 to 4 credits and course description. Effective Fall 2006. This course is designed to provide an understanding of the development of fundamental movement skills and movement concepts related to the elementary physical education student. Emphasis is placed on attaining knowledge of developmentally appropriate practices for the elementary physical education student. This course includes fundamental movements, educational games, and educational dance.

 

ESS 117, Health Related Fitness Activities in Physical Education, new course, 2 credits. Effective Fall 2006. This course is designed to help students start to understand health-related fitness self-efficacy promotion through lifetime physical activity applications. Students will focus on exercise prescription design and goal setting strategies linked to skill development in fitness related activities. This activity-based course will focus on fitness principle applications as they relate to cardiovascular, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition activities. Pedagogical strategies and the Personalized System of Instruction model will be introduced for health related fitness activity integration.

 

ESS 207, Human Motor Behavior, changes course description and prerequisites. Effective Fall 2006. This course is an investigation into the nature of human motor development, motor control and motor learning. Topics will be approached from a constraints perspective, focusing on the interaction among the individual, the environment, and the task. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: ESS 112, for ESS-PE majors.

 

ESS 225, Introduction to Instruction, changes title from Management and Instruction in Physical Education, from 2 to 3 credits, and course description. Effective Fall 2006. This course focuses on knowledge and growth in the art and science of teaching, including clinical observation of physical education at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Content includes the characteristics and behaviors of effective teaching, classroom management theories and practices, and meeting the diverse needs of K-12 students. Emphasis is on learning to plan for quality instruction in physical education settings. Students will begin development of electronic portfolios.

 

ESS 226, Clinical Experience in Teaching Physical Education I, course deletion.

 

ESS 231, Introduction to Special Physical Education, changes course description and prerequisites. Effective Fall 2006.

Introduces the students to the process of providing physical activity for individuals with a disability  disabilities and other health-related conditions. The course will provides knowledge of: 1) the general characteristics of selected disabilities and how these disabilities affect a person’s movement potential; 2) the federal and state laws pertaining to the education of persons with a disability disabilities; 3) the process of referral and placement of students in special education including the least restrictive environment; 4) appropriate teaching methods to use for inclusion placements; 5) adapted techniques for motor development, physical fitness and aquatics programs; and, 6) behavior management techniques. In addition, all students will participate as a staff member in the Motor Development Program which is conducted on 11 Saturday mornings for a total of 25 clinical hours for the semester. Prerequisites: ESS 207, 225 (or concurrent enrollment)

 

ESS 258, Teaching Activities I, changes title from Team Sports, course description and prerequisites. Effective Fall 2006.

An activity-based course focused on the movement skills as they relate to children in grades 3-12 within team, individual and leisure activities. The main purpose is for the students to develop the knowledge of the basic skills and progressions related to each activity. There will be two team, two individual, and two leisure activities selected from, but not limited to, the following activities: Team (Soccer, Basketball, Ultimate Frisbee, Field Games <Speedball, Speedaway, Gator Ball>), Individual (Badminton, Bowling), Leisure (Yoga, Pilates, Fitness Walking). Prerequisites: Admission to the ESS Physical Education Teacher Education program.

 

ESS 261, Educational Gymnastics, changes title from Developmental Gymnastics, from 1 to 2 credits, and course description.  This course prepares the student to safely plan and conduct an educational gymnastics curriculum through the study of jumping and landing activities, balance activities, hanging and swinging activities, and rolling and transfer of weight activities. Emphasis is on appropriate progressions, safety procedures, proper mechanics, and sequencing of skills, methodology, fitness and games within a gymnastics environment and error analysis on a variety of gymnastics apparatus. Course will include 4-6 clinical hours with school children. Prerequisites: ESS 112

 

ESS 310, Teaching Outdoor Activities in Physical Education, removes ESS 226 as prerequisite.

 

ESS 322, Elementary Methods, Assessment and Clinical in Physical Education, changes title and number from C-I 323, Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education, and changes from 2 to 4 credits, course description and prerequisites. Effective Fall 2007.  A junior level pedagogy course focused on developmentally appropriate methodology and assessment for the elementary physical education setting. Emphasis is placed on developing the capability to apply an understanding of planning for learning for the K-5 student. This course includes completion of a clinical experience in the elementary physical education setting. Prerequisites: ESS 207 or concurrent enrollment. Admission to the Physical Education Teacher Education Program.

 

ESS 325, Secondary Methods, Assessment and Clinical in Physical Education, changes title and number from C-I 325, Methods of Teaching Middle/Secondary Physical Education, and changes from 2 to 4 credits, course description and prerequisites. Effective Fall 2007. A junior level pedagogy course focused on developmentally appropriate methodology and assessment for the secondary physical education setting. Emphasis is placed on developing the capability to apply an understanding of planning for learning for the 6-12 student. This course includes completion of a clinical experience in the secondary physical education setting. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Education Teacher Education Program.

 

ESS 367, Teaching Activities II, changes title from Individual Sports, course description, and prerequisites. Effective Fall 2006.  An activity-based course focused on movement skills as they relate to children in grades 3-12 within team, individual and leisure activities. The main purpose is for the students to develop the knowledge of the basic skills and progressions related to each activity. There will be two team, two individual, and two leisure activities selected from, but not limited to, the following activities: Team (Softball, Volleyball, Team Handball, Flag Football, Ultimate Frisbee); Individual (Golf, Tennis); Leisure (Archery, Cardio Kickboxing, Inline Skating). Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Education Teacher Education Program.

 

ESS 401, Teaching Dance, changes title from Dance, and course description. Effective Fall 2006.

Theory and methods of teaching age-appropriate dance activities for students in elementary and secondary physical education. Emphasis will be on skill progressions, teaching models and methods, and assessment. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Education Teacher Education Program.

 

ESS 412, Issues and Philosophies in Teaching Physical Education, changes course description, prerequisites, and grading pattern.  Effective Fall 2006.  This course is designed to provide student teachers with an opportunity for communication and discussion focused on student teaching experiences. Course emphasis is placed on development of teaching competencies as outlined by the Beginning Teacher Standards. Prerequisites: Completion of all course work required to student teach. Successful completion of PRAXIS II exam. Pass/Fail

 

ESS 422, Teaching Healthy Active Lifestyles, changes title from Methods of Teaching an Active Healthy Lifestyle, course description, prerequisites, and from 4 to 3 credits. Effective Fall 2006.  This course provides the pre-service physical education student with the pedagogical skills necessary to promote, advocate for, and empower K-12 students to become lifelong learners who value physical activity. The emphasis of this course will focus on health related fitness concepts and applications related to exercise prescription, nutritional planning, exercise adherence, and fitness skill development for students in the K-12 setting. Physical education majors will also explore curricular and instructional models that promote and foster health and fitness applications for K-12 students. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Education Teacher Education Program. ESS 302 or concurrent enrollment.

 

ESS 423/523, Individual and Social Factors in Physical Activity, changes title from Adherence Principles for a Physically Active Lifestyle, course description, and prerequisites. Effective Fall 2007.  This course provides the essential theoretical foundations and practical applications of the psychological concepts involved in living a physically active lifestyle. Content will include working with individuals on motivation, anxiety/stress reduction, self concepts, and character development; working with groups for cohesion, cooperation and competition, conflict resolution, and goal achievement; and development of personal skills and knowledge to achieve desired goals in physical activity environments. Prerequisites: Admission to an Exercise and Sport Science major program.

 

ESS 424, Curriculum Development and Administration of Elementary Secondary Physical Education Programs, changes course description. Senior level experience designed to provide an understanding of the curriculum development process through application. Selection of activities based on national and state standards, community resources, growth and developmental characteristics and facilities. Includes content and experiences related to PK-12 program development including scope and sequence, program evaluation, scheduling, advocacy activity and co-curricular/outside school activities. The administrative component will include principles related to gender equity, risk management, budgeting, collaboration, and program accountability. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Education Teacher Education Program. Senior Standing.

 

Goal of proposal was to strengthen elementary part of curriculum, address developmental and psychological aspects of PE, identify courses taught by ESS faculty as ESS courses instead of C-I. Proposal was endorsed by TEGC; department consulted Psychology and Sociology departments regarding ESS 423 changes. M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal.

 

Proposal #2:

Women’s Studies Minor, add PSY 305 to Category C.

 

W-S 320, Violence Against Women, changes prerequisites to W-S 100 or 210 or 230 or EFN 205.

 

W-S 330/530, Topics: Women, Gender, and Society, changes prerequisites to W-S 100 or 210 or 230 or EFN 205 for undergraduates only.

 

W-S 340, Women, Learning, and Knowledge, changes prerequisites to W-S 100 or 210 or 230 or EFN 305.

 

W-S 370, The History of Black Women’s Activism, changes prerequisites to W-S 100 or 210 or 230 or EFN 205 or ERS 100.

 

W-S 371, Women, Agriculture, and the Environment, changes prerequisites to W-S 100 or 210 or 230 or EFN 205.

 

W-S 374, Women, Poverty and Public Policy, new course, 3 credits. Effective Spring 2006.

The course will analyze the historical underpinnings to the creation and evolution of welfare with special attention paid to the ways gender, race, and class oppression have shaped welfare in the past and today. Wage differentials, occupational segregation, unpaid work, and gender violence will be discussed in relation to the construction of poverty. How poverty affects the lives of poor women and their children will also be explored. Current welfare policy will be analyzed and suggestions for reform based on current research will be developed by the class. Prerequisites: W-S 100 or 210 or 230 or POL 205 or PSY 318 or EFN 205. Offered Sem. II of even numbered years.

 

W-S/SOC 375, Lesbian Studies, new course, 3 credits. Effective Fall 2006.

Examines the social construction of sexual orientation and its meaning for women and women’s equality. The course draws on a range of sources, including scientific research, history, literature, psychological theory, and popular culture. Prerequisites: W-S 100 or 210 or 230 or EFN 205. Offered Sem. I, alternate years.

 

W-S 410, Women’s Issues in the “Third World,” changes prerequisites to W-S 100 or 210 or 230 or EFN 205, and another 300-level W-S course or cross-listed course.

 

Political Science department was contacted regarding W-S 374. Both 374 and 375 will be electives (Category 3).

M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposals.

 

Proposal #3:

College of Business Administration, change in Requirements for Graduation, eliminate requirement to complete at least 60 credits outside business.

 

This is no longer an accreditation requirement effective for all students graduating after May 2006. M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal.

 

4.             Dean approved General Education substitutions:

                BUS:       ENG 303, Introduction to Literature, from UW-Stout, for ENG 200

                                                ESS 100, Lifetime Fitness, from Maranatha Bible College, for HPR 105

 

5.             Old Business: UCC Chair distributed handout regarding the online/hybrid/DE courses. Members agreed that it correctly described what had been discussed at the last meeting, with a minor change. Discussion will continue at the next meeting.

 

6.             New Business: None

 

Meeting was adjourned at 5:00 p.m.