Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Minutes

November 25, 2008

 

 

Members Present: Ahmed, Friesen, Johnson, Kahl, Rolfhus, Secchi, Sullivan, Van Winkle, Zheng                              

Consultants Present: Schumacher, Dittman, Walls, Burkhardt,Clow

Members Absent: Berlin (exc.), Socha (exc.), Decker

Guests:, M. Johnson, Sherony, K. Hoar, Severson

 

  1. Approval of  November 11,2008 minutes

 

M/S/P to approve minutes

 

  1. Second readings: none

 

               

  1. First readings:

 

A.        BIO  312  Human Anatomy and Physiology I   4cr.,  course revision – course

            description, effective Fall 2009                                 

A comprehensive study of general anatomical and physiological principles of cells, body fluid compartments, the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems and the special senses. Required elements of the laboratory portion of the course include computer simulations, microscopy, mammal organ dissections and study of cadaver prosections. Prerequisites: BIO 103 or 105 and CHM 103.

 

BIO  313  Human Anatomy and Physiology II   4cr.,  course revision – course description, effective Fall 2009

A comprehensive study of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive and endocrine systems. Required elements of the laboratory portion of this course include computer simulations, microscopy, mammal organ dissections and the study of cadaver prosections. Prerequisites: BIO 312.

 

M/S/P to approve proposal and waive 2nd reading

 

B.         MS  499  Independent Studies in MS  1-3 cr.,  course revision - course deletion.

 

 

MS  101  Introduction to the Army Profession  2 cr.,  course revision- course description, credits, instructional pattern, effective Fall 2009

This course introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and Army operations.  Focus is placed on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Offered Semester I. Lect. 1, Lab 2.

 

 

MS  102  Basic Leadership  2 cr.,  course revision – course description, credits, instructional pattern,  effective Spring 2010

This course provides an overview of leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback and using effective writing skills. Students explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, and competencies in the context of practical, hands- on, and interactive exercises. Continued emphasis is placed on recruitment and retention of students.  Cadre role models and the building of stronger relationships among students through common experience and practical interaction are critical aspects of the MS 102 experience.  Prerequisite: MS 101 or Department Chair approval, Offered Semester II. Lect.1, Lab 2.

 

 

MS  201  Individual Leadership Studies  2cr.,  course revision – course description, prerequisites,  instructional pattern, effective Fall 2009

This course explores the dimensions of creative innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamic and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework. (trait and behavior theories). Students practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership attributes and core leader competencies through an understanding of Army rank, structure, duties, and basic aspects of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies provide tangible context for learning the Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply to contemporary operating environment. Prerequisite: MS 102 or Department Chair approval. Offered Semester I. Lect. 1, Lab 2.

 

 

MS  202  Leadership and Teamwork  2cr.,  course revision – course description, instructional pattern, effective Spring 2010.

This course examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COE). This course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. Students develop greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real – world scenarios.  Offered Semester II. Lect.1, Lab 2.

 

 

MS  301  Leadership and Problem Solving  3cr.,  course revision – course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2009

 This course challenges students to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with scenarios related to squad tactical operations.  Students receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self- evaluations, students continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities. The focus is developing students’ tactical leadership abilities to enable them to succeed at ROTC’s summer Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Prerequisites: MS 202 or Department Chair approval.  Offered Semester I.

 

 

MS  302  Leadership and Ethical Decision Making  3cr.,  course revision – course description, prerequisites, effective Spring 2010.

This course uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build student awareness and skills in leading tactical operations up to platoon level. Students review aspects of combat, stability, and support operations. They also conduct military briefings and develop proficiency in garrison operation orders. The focus is on exploring, evaluating, and developing skills in decision – making, persuading, and motivating team members in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Students are evaluated on what they know and do as leaders as they prepare to attend the ROTC summer Leadership Development Assessment Course (LDAC). Prerequisite: MS 301 or Department Chair approval. Offered Semester II.

 

 

MS 401  Leadership and Management  3cr.,  course revision – course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2009

This course transitions the focus of students’ learning from being trained, mentored and evaluated to learning how to train, mentor and evaluate underclass students. Students learn the duties and responsibilities of an Army staff officer and apply Military Decision Making Process, Army writing style and the Army’s principles of training and training management cycle during weekly training meetings to plan, execute and assess battalion training events. Students will learn about the special trust proposed by the US Constitution to Army officers. Students will learn Army values and ethics and how to apply them to everyday life as well as in the contemporary operating environment. Students will learn about the officer’s role in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, counseling subordinates, administrative actions and methods on how to best manage their career as Army officers. Prerequisite: MS 302. Offered Semester I.

 

 

MS  403  Officership  3cr.,  course revision – course description, prerequisites,  instructional pattern, effective Spring 2010

This course explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the Contemporary Operating Environment Students examine differences in the customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, Rules of Engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interfacing with non- government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing students for their first unit assignment. It uses case studies, scenarios. And “What Now, Lieutenant?” exercises to prepare students to face complex, ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the Army. Prerequisite: MS 401. Offered Semester II. Lect. 2, Lab 2.

 

Postponed until College of Liberal Studies reviews curriculum changes.

This was a 1st reading; there will be 2nd reading

 

C.         Economics Major, (all colleges excluding Business Administration and Teacher certification programs)   change in required course and electives, effective Spring 2009

At least 12 credits of these electives must be taken in economics courses numbered 300 or above.

 

M/S/P to approve the proposal and waive 2nd reading

 

 

D.         ESS  258  Teaching Activities  3cr.,  course revision – course description, prerequisites, effective Spring 2009

An activity- based course focused on skills and knowledge related to team, individual and leisure activities for children in grades 3-12. There will be two team, two individual, and two leisure activities selected from the following activities: team (soccer, basketball, ultimate frisbee, field games; speedball, speedway, gator ball), individual (badminton, bowling), and leisure (yoga, pilates, fitness walking). Prerequisite: ESS 225

 

Postpone until a representative can be present

 

 

E.         GEO/ESC  390  Geographic Field Methods  3cr.,  course revision – course description, title, prerequisites, effective Fall 2009

Covers fundamental concepts of field methods as applied to physical, cultural, urban and environmental geography. Students will gain experience in sampling, field surveying, GPS mapping, and observational data collection techniques. Includes reconnaissance and detailed surveys using current methods, GPS and field equipment; and practical integration of field data into a geographic information system. Prerequisites: GEO/ESC 385 or concurrent enrollment.

 

 

GEO/ESC  440/540  Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photographs  3cr.,  course revision – course description, prerequisites effective Fall 2009

Systematic applications of aerial photographs in the interpretation and analysis of geographic problems. Emphasis is placed on digital photograph interpretation within a geographic information system. Topics include urban and rural land use, natural resource and environmental assessment. Prerequisite: GEO/ESC 385, Lect.2, Lab 2. 

 

GEO/ ESC  445/545  Advanced Remote Sensing  3cr.,  course revision – course description, instructional pattern, effective Fall 2009

Advanced techniques of digital satellite and airborne image analysis processing, emphasizing theory and applications in natural resource, land use, and environmental assessment. Includes practical approaches to integrating imagery with geographic information systems area for spatial analyses and decision – making. Data acquisition, integrity, manipulation, formatting, storage and retrieval are also examined. Prerequisites: GEO/ESC 345. Offered semester II

 

Geoarchaeology Minor   add required course, effective Fall 2009

(all colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) – 23 credits, including ARC 195, 404, ESC 101,222, GEO/ESC 385, 426; and 3 credits of GEO/ESC 490 or 499, or ARC 409 with topic in geoarchaeology.

 

Geography Major: Environmental Science Concentration   add required course, change electives, effective Fall 2009

(all colleges excluding Teacher certification programs) – 53-59 credits, including ESC 101, GEO 110, 201, 200, GEO/ESC 250, 385, GEO 401; three courses from ESC 211, 221, 222, GEO/ESC 422, 425, 426, 427, 460: three courses from GEO/ESC  345, 390, 440, 445, 485, GEO 488; and MTH 145; and either Bio 103 or 105, 204, and 210, or CHM 103, 104, 301; three credits of GEO/ESC 450, 490, or 499 may be applied to major.

 

  Committee questions:

1) Can prerequisite of GEO 385 be concurrent for Geo 440 since it can be for 390? 2) Are there substantive changes in GEO 440 or is the description change more a matter of wording and updating due to technology. 3) Geoarchaeology minor used to require ARC 310, was the exclusion intentional?

 

This was a 1st reading; there will be a 2nd reading

 

 

  1. Old Business: The Academic Planning Committee is discussing on-line courses. UCC chair will consult with APC Chair to avoid duplication. CBA Curriculum Committee also discussing.
  2. New Business: none

            

  Meeting adjourned: 4:35 p.m.  Note: There will likely be a meeting January 27, 2009.