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    Fall 2014 – Philosophy Offerings

     PHL 100        Introduction to Philosophy

    An introduction to the main views on important philosophic topics, such as personal identity, freedom, knowledge, morality, religion and social justice.

    PHL 100.01     9:55 AM-10:50 AM     M/W/F           CENT 2313    Instructor: Dr. Ronald Glass

    PHL 100.02     11:00 AM-11:55 AM   M/W/F           CENT 2313    Instructor: Dr. Ronald Glass

    PHL 100.03     1:10 PM-2:05 PM        M/W/F           CENT 2313    Instructor: Dr. Sharon Scherwitz

    PHL 100.04     2:15 PM-3:10 PM        M/W/F           CENT 2313    Instructor: Dr. Sharon Scherwitz

    PHL 100.05     9:25 AM-10:50 AM     T/H     CENT 2310    Instructor: Dr. Sheryl Tuttle Ross

    PHL 100.06     11:00 AM-12:25PM    T/H     CENT 2305    Instructor: Dr. Samuel Cocks

    Please Note: This course fulfills Category H2 of General Education.

    PHL 101      Introduction to Logic

    This course provides the student with an introduction to the logical structure of the ordinary language we use to express ourselves. It promotes an understanding of the workings of language and enhances one’s ability to argue validly, to use language effectively and to think critically. This course fulfills requirement B.2 in the Mathematical/Logic Systems Skills component of the General Education Program.

    PHL 101.01     11:00 AM-12:25 PM   T/H     CENT 2310    Instructor: Dr. Mary Krizan

    PHL 101.02     11:00 AM-11:55 AM   M/W/F           CENT 2310    Instructor: Dr. Eric Kraemer

    Please Note: This course fulfills Category B2 of General Education.

    Philosophy Majors, please note it is important to complete this course early in your academic career.

    PHL 205    History of Philosophy I

    This is the first course in the history of philosophy sequence. This class is an introduction to principal questions of philosophy and history of their analysis from the pre-Socratic period to the Renaissance. Focus will be on Plato and Aristotle, the most famous philosophers in history with tremendous impact today.

    PHL 205.01     3:55 PM-5:20 PM        T/H     CENT 2313    Instructor: Dr. Mary Krizan

    Please Note: There is NO prerequisite for this course.

    Philosophy Majors/Minors, please note it is important to complete this course early in your academic career.

    PHL 206     History of Philosophy II

     This course covers the principal questions of philosophy and history of their analysis from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment.   

    PHL 206.01     1:10 PM-2:05 PM        M/W/F           CENT 2302    Instructor: Dr. Ronald Glass

    Please Note: There is NO prerequisite for this course.

    Philosophy Majors and Minors, please note it is important to complete this course early in your academic career.

    PHL 303  Ethical Theory

     Change to listing, Fall 2014: PHL 303, Ethical Theory, is now PHL 495, Section 03. To register for the class, please contact Dr. Kraemer (ekraemer@uwlax.edu) or Janet Abnet (jabnet@uwlax.edu.)  (Updated 7/24/14)

    We look for the ethical theory having the strongest justification. Topics include: is justification in ethics of a different kind than in matters of fact, are moral expressions definable, are moral claims true or false or only expressions of feeling, do only consequences count, are principles crucial for ethics, can at least some ethical claims be known to be true and justified, and what is the best approach for resolving disagreement about ethical claims.

    PHL 303.01     2:15 PM-3:40 PM        M/W   CENT 2302    Instructor: Dr. Ronald Glass

    Prerequisite is either PHL 100/200 or PHL 101.  But, prerequisite can be waived by consulting the instructor.

    WRITING EMPHASIS.

    PHL 311     Philosophy of Language

     A survey of issues concerning the meaning of words. Their referential, syntactic and pragmatic features are explored. The nature and roles of linguistic rules of use, competence and their relation to word, speaker and hearer meaning are explored in view of speech act theory.

    PHL 311.01     12:40 PM-2:05 PM      T/H     CENT 2302    Instructor: Dr. Mary Krizan

    Please Note: Prerequisite is either PHL 100/200 or PHL 101.

    PHL 323   Phenomenology-Existentialism-Postmodernism

    A study of three major schools in continental philosophy: phenomenology, existentialism and postmodernism. Phenomenology: Learning to describe the world as it appears and is meaningful to us through a close study of the interaction of consciousness and reality. Existentialism: a philosophy of the lived experience of concrete human individuals, including the experience of anxiety, love, conflict and freedom. Postmodernism, including post structuralism and deconstruction: a philosophy concerned with the fragmentation of text and of subject, recognizing the impossibility of any definitive conception of reality or self.

    PHL 323.01     9:25 AM-10:50 AM     T/H     CENT 2313    Instructor: Dr. Samuel Cocks

    Prerequisite is either PHL 100/200.

    PHL 330   Philosophy of Food

    Food is not merely essential for human existence, nutritious and central to sustenance, but is tied to human aesthetic experience value and meaning. Philosophical discourse has recently opened up in a new area of scholarship called Philosophy of Food. We explore the philosophical questions of how we value food, what it may mean to claim it as aesthetic, healthy and ethical.

    PHL 330.01     2:15 PM-3:40 PM        T/H     CENT 2313    Instructor: Dr. Sharon Scherwitz

    Please Note: There is NO prerequisite for this course.

    PHL 332     Philosophy of the Arts

    An examination of aesthetic experience and the questions that are relevant to works of art. Questions discussed include: What is art? What is artistic creation? What is artistic expression? What is artistic form? What is artistic criticism?

    PHL 332.411   Online                         Instructor: Dr. Sheryl Tuttle Ross

    Writing emphasis.  Please Note: There is NO prerequisite for this course.

    Please Note: This course fulfills Category F of General Education.

    PHL 333    Philosophy of Mind

    “I am a thing which thinks,” said Descartes. But what kind of a thing is that? Am I just a brain? Am I an immortal soul? Other related questions include: “What, if anything, makes me the same person throughout my life?” “What are emotions?” and “Do I ever act freely?” Implications of psychological research for these important questions will be considered. Cross listed with PSY 333.

                PHL 333.01     9:55 AM-10:50 AM     M/W/F           CENT 2302    Instructor: Dr. Eric Kraemer

    Please Note: Prerequisite is either PHL 100/200, PHL 101 or PSY 100

    PHL 335     Multicultural Philosophy in the United States (ES)

    This survey course will examine philosophical ideas and systems that are generated from a wide range of cultural traditions found in the United States. The aim of this search will be to broaden and deepen understanding and appreciation of the diversities of philosophies in the United States.

    PHL 335.01     3:55 PM-5:20 PM        T/H     CENT 2302    Instructor: Dr. Sharon Scherwitz

    Please Note: There is NO prerequisite for this course.

    PHL 340     Business and Professional Ethics

    Ethical issues in the conduct of business and professions will be examined by focusing on case studies in business and professions that raise ethical issues. A variety of ethical theories will be used to illuminate the ethical features of business and professional decisions and their effects on employees and society. The goal is to improve ability to identify factors and considerations that can play a role in improving the ethical character of business and professions.

    PHL 340.01     5:30 PM-8:15 PM        T/H     CENT 2310    Instructor: Dr. Sheryl Tuttle Ross

    Please Note: There is NO prerequisite for this course.

    PHL 425    Wilderness Philosophy

    The intention of this course is to investigate the many different ways in which wilderness is defined and understood within environmental philosophy. The approach will be broad and will cover a variety of themes. Our desire is both to clarify the positive characteristics of the wilderness idea while also recognizing its significant flaws and hazards. The moral implication of the wilderness concept will be given special attention. A variety of different philosophical perspectives will be utilized.

    PHL 425.01     12:40 PM-2:05 PM      T/H     CENT 2313    Instructor: Dr. Samuel Cocks

    Prerequisite is PHL 100/200 or ENV 201.