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Fall 2013 – Philosophy Offerings

 101 Introduction to Logic                 Dr. Krizan                       8:50-9:45a MWF
                                                 Dr. Kraemer                     2:15-3:40p T/H
      

This course provides the student with an introduction to the logical structure of the ordinary language we use to express ourselves.  It promotes an understanding of the workings of language and enhances one’s ability to argue validly, to use language effectively and to think critically.  This course fulfills requirement B.2 in the Mathematical/Logical Systems Skills component of the General Education Program.  Philosophy Majors please note it is important to complete this course early in your academic career.

 

200 Literature of Philosophy               Dr. Cocks                        11:00-12:25p T/H

An examination of the expression, development and conflict of the ideas and values in current and time-honored works of philosophy from major world cultures.  Topics to be studied include religion, ethics, knowledge, personal identity, justice and freedom.  Writing emphasis.   Note: Students cannot earn credit for the Philosophy Major/Minor in both PHL 100 and PHL 200.

 

205 History of Philosophy I               Dr. Krizan                        11:00-11:55a MWF

This is the first course in the history of philosophy sequence. This class is an introduction to principle questions of philosophy and history of their analysis from the pre-Socratic period to the Renaissance.  Focus will be on Plato and Aristotle, the most famous philosophers in history with tremendous impact today. Philosophy Majors and Minors please note it is important to complete the series of History of Philosophy courses early in your academic career.

 

300 (Topics) Laughing Matters: Philosophy of Humor          Dr. Ross     11:00-12:25p T/H

Comedy and laughter have preoccupied the thoughts of philosophers throughout the ages as we have wondered about their nature, value, and meaning. Aristotle once maintained that what separates humans from other animals is our sense of humor. This course begins with Aristotle's insights found in his Poetics and considers a range of classical and contemporary theories. This course introduces students to philosophical theories, methods, and questions while focusing on the phenomena of comedy and laughter.  Writing emphasis.  Prerequisite can be waived.

 

303 Ethical Theory                         Dr. Glass                         12:05-1:00p MWF

We look for the ethical theory having the strongest justification.  Topics include: is justification in ethics of a different kind than in matters of fact, are moral expressions definable, are moral claims true or false or only expressions of feeling, do only consequences count, are principles crucial for ethics, can at least some ethical claims be known to be true and justified, and what is the best approach for resolving disagreement about ethical claims.  Writing emphasis.  Prerequisite can be waived.

 

332 Philosophy of the Arts                Dr. Ross                         5:30-8:15p Wed

An examination of aesthetic experience and the questions that are relevant to works of art.  Questions discussed include:  What is art?  What is artistic creation?  What is artistic expression?  What is artistic form?  What is artistic criticism?  Writing emphasis.  Prerequisite can be waived.

 

334 Philosophy of Science                 Dr. Kraemer                      11:00-12:25p T/H

What is science?  How does it really work?  Can science tell us all there is to know about the world and ourselves?  Why has science assumed such an important role in contemporary life?  Is its exalted reputation justified?  Is science sexist and culturally biased?  This course will answer these questions by exploring both the nature and the limitations of the scientific enterprise.  Other topics of interest will include the creationism vs. evolutionism debate, the status of parapsychology, and the relevance of science for religious belief.  This course satisfies the additional science course required for the B.S. degree in the College of Liberal Studies.  Prerequisite can be waived.

 

335 Multicultural Phil in the US           Dr. Scherwitz                    4:00-5:25p MW

This survey course will examine philosophical ideas and systems that are generated from a wide range of cultural traditions found in the United States.  The aim of this search will be to broaden and deepen understanding and appreciation of the diversities of philosophies in the United States.

 

341 Environmental Ethics                  Dr. Cocks                        12:40-2:05p T/H

Philosophical reflections on humanity’s relationship to the natural world.  The course will
examine Western concepts of nature, especially in ancient Greek philosophy and in Modern philosophy.  On the basis of this study, we will discuss ways in which we interact with nature.  In particular, we will focus on practices that are rooted in technology and capitalism.  We will then study contemporary environmentalist movements (such as Deep Ecology, Eco-feminism and Eco-phenomenology) as alternatives to those human practices inspired by the technological and capitalist character of our contemporary world.  Prerequisite can be waived.

 

342 Phil of Love Sex & Friendship         Dr. Scherwitz                    2:15-3:40p T/H

An examination into the nature of a variety of kinds of love including love of knowledge, love of friends, erotic love, and parental love.  Philosophical consideration of topics such as the nature of desire, the politics of desire, sexual intercourse, adultery, monogamy, polygamy, homosexuality and the obligations of friends as well as the institutions of marriage and parenthood.  Prerequisite can be waived.

 

360 Zen Buddhism                         Dr. Cocks                        4:00-5:25p T/H

Introduction to the main questions in the Asian philosophical traditions.  Questions will be centered in ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.  Conceptual connections will be made with European and North American philosophical traditions.  Prerequisite can be waived.

 

431 Advanced Philosophy of Religion             Dr. Glass                  1:10-2:05p MWF

Readings from recent scholarly journals and Medieval philosophy are the focus of the course and background for examination of topics such as:  What justifies that a human can be God?  Can God make a world permitting possible contradictions such as a world in which there is an unstoppable cannonball and an immovable lamppost?  Exactly how do humans, persons, and souls differ if they do?  Prerequisite: PHL 200.  PHL 101 and 331 are strongly recommended.

 

496 Integrative Seminar                   Dr. Cocks                        6:00-8:45p Thurs

This class is the capstone requirement for the major.  As the title suggests, you will have the opportunity to integrate themes and methods from your previous philosophy course work.  In addition, there will be important emphases upon creative individual and collaborative inquiry and research.  This class may be selected for honors credit and will provide writing emphasis credit.