2012-2013 Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning Workshops

You may register online via the links within the table.
Full workshop descriptions are available below this table.
Click here to download the workshop schedule.

Title   

   Date                Time                   Location

Rethinking Your Grading Workload

THU 8/23      1:00-2:30 p.m.    3214 Centennial

Use Your Grading to Document Teaching Effectiveness

THU 8/23      2:30-3:30 p.m.    3214 Centennial

Improve Your Multiple Choice Tests

THU 9/6        8:00-9:00 a.m.    161 Wing                
FRI  9/7         1:30-2:30 p.m.    3212 Centennial

Reduce Student Test Anxiety

THU 9/13      8:00-8:45 a.m.    161 Wing                   
FRI  9/14       1:30-2:15 p.m.    3212 Centennial

Blended Learning

THU 9/20      2:15-3:45 p.m.    161 Wing                 
FRI  9/21       1:30-3:00 p.m.    3212 Centennial

Introduction to Online Teaching

THU 9/27      9:30-10:15 a.m.  161 Wing                 
FRI  9/28       1:30-2:15 p.m.    3212 Centennial

Authentic Assignments

THU 10/4      2:15-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing                 
FRI  10/5       1:30-2:45 p.m.    3212 Centennial

Using the Inclusive Excellence Inventory

THU 10/11    2:30-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing                  
FRI  10/12     1:30-2:30 p.m.    3212 Centennial

Brief  Interventions that Improve Student Achievement

THU 10/18    8:00-9:00 a.m.    161 Wing                  
FRI  10/19     1:30-2:30 p.m.    3212 Centennial

When and Why: Blogs and Wikis

THU 10/25    2:15-3:15 p.m.    161 Wing                  
FRI  10/26     1:30-2:30 p.m.,   161 Wing

Student Perspectives on Writing

THU 11/1      2:15-3:15 p.m.    161 Wing                 
FRI  11/2       1:30-2:30 p.m.    3212 Centennial

Investigation of Student Engagement
at the Course Level (CLASSE)

THU 11/8      2:30-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing
FRI   11/9       1:30-2:30 p.m.   3212 Centennial

Self and Peer Evaluation of Online Courses

THU 11/15    9:30-10:15 a.m.  161 Wing                  
FRI  11/16     1:30-2:15 p.m.
   161 Wing

D2L Objectives and Competencies

FRI  11/30     1:30-3:00 p.m.    161 Wing

Understanding and Enhancing Student Motivation

THU 12/6      2:30-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing                 
FRI  12/7       1:30-2:30 p.m.   
161 Wing

Introduction to Lesson Study

THU 2/7        2:15-3:15 p.m.    161 Wing                
FRI  2/8         1:30-2:30 p.m.    161 Wing

Writing and Critical Thinking: A Case Study

THU 2/14      2:15-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing                 
FRI  2/15       1:30-2:45 p.m.    161 Wing

Beyond Google: Advanced Search Strategies to
 Enhance Your Teaching  and Scholarship

THU 2/21      9:30-10:15 a.m.  161 Wing                  
FRI  2/22       1:30-2:15 p.m.    161 Wing

Backward Design

THU 2/28      2:15-4:15 p.m.    161 Wing                 
FRI  3/1         1:30-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing

Designing and Managing Collaborative Assignments

THU 3/7        2:30-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing               
FRI  3/8         1:30-2:30 p.m.    161 Wing

Tools for Program-Level Assessment

THU 3/14      2:30-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing                  
FRI   3/15      1:30-2:30 p.m.    161 Wing

Twitter as an Assessment Tool

THU 3/28      2:15-3:15 p.m.    161 Wing                 
FRI  3/29       1:30-2:30 p.m.    161 Wing

Using the Inclusive Excellence Inventory

THU 4/11      2:30-3:30 p.m.    161 Wing                 
FRI  4/12       1:30-2:30 p.m.    161 Wing



Rethinking Your Grading Workload
Bryan Kopp and Deb Hoskins
Thursday, August 23, 1:00-2:30 p.m., 3214 Centennial Hall

Where do we spend most of our time as instructors?  For many, the most time-consuming part of our job is grading written work. Is this investment of time worth it? Does student work improve based on our feedback? In this workshop, we will discuss strategies for giving assignments, guiding learning through feedback, and grading student work. Participants will identify a particular assignment and then determine how to redesign it to shift more of their time from grading to teaching.

Use Your Grading to Document Teaching Effectiveness
Bill Cerbin
Thursday, August 23, 2:30-3:30 p.m., 3214 Centennial Hall

The Joint Promotion Committee and Career Progression Committee expect candidates to demonstrate their teaching effectiveness by providing evidence of student learning. This session describes ways to use graded work from your class, i.e., tests, quizzes and assignments, to document student progress and achievement of course learning goals. You will have an opportunity to look at examples from recently promoted instructors, and plan ways to collect evidence in your classes during the year.   

Improve Your Multiple Choice Tests
Bill Cerbin
Thursday, September 6, 8:00-9:00 a.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, September 7, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

The session focuses on how to improve your multiple choice tests to better assess your course goals. You will learn principles of writing good test items, tips on overall test construction, how to analyze and improve test items that have not been working well, and ways to write multiple choice items that test complex thinking.

Reduce Student Test Anxiety
Bill Cerbin
Thursday, September 13, 8:00-8:45 a.m, 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, September 14, 1:30-2:15 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

Excessive test anxiety is a significant problem that interferes with students’ studying and impairs their performance. This session explores why students choke in test situations and what instructors can do about it. It focuses on a simple strategy in which students write about their test-related worries for a few minutes before taking a test. Research demonstrates that high-test anxious students who use this strategy improve their test performance substantially. We will discuss why the strategy works, how you can use it and how you can determine whether it helps improve students’ test performance in your classes. We will also examine a short questionnaire you can use to determine the prevalence of test anxiety among your students.

Blended Learning
Jen Snook
Thursday, September 20, 2:15-3:45 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, September 21, 1:30-3:00 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

This is an overview presentation about the possibilities and strategies in offering a blended (also called hybrid) course at UW-L. The presentation will define blended learning, explain the benefits of the blended course design approach, and discuss strategies for offering a quality blended course. Information will be provided about design considerations for blended courses and example course materials from blended courses will be shared.  No experience with blended course design is needed to attend this introductory session.  

Introduction to Online Teaching
Brian Udermann and Jen Snook
Thursday, September 27, 9:30-10:15 a.m.,161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, September 28, 1:30-2:15 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

Have you been thinking about the possibility of developing and teaching an online course? This session is designed for instructors who are considering teaching online for the first time, or who have minimal online teaching experience. Topics will include creating a syllabus, delivering content, course navigation, academic integrity, student engagement, student and faculty expectations, and resources available through UW-L. There will also be a considerable amount of time dedicated to questions from participants.

Authentic Assignments
Bill Cerbin and Bryan Kopp
Thursday, October 4, 2:15-3:30 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, October 5 1:30-2:45 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

We want our students to be able to solve problems and think analytically, carefully, imaginatively—beyond the classroom. Yet we know that students’ ability to use knowledge in new situations is limited. Authentic tasks can be a bridge between school learning and real-life applications. They engage students in using knowledge in “real-world” ways, with genuine purposes, and audiences. This session explores how to create and grade assignments that give students more practice, feedback and guidance in using what they learn in the classroom to address messy, complex, real-life problems.

Using the Inclusive Excellence Inventory
Deb Hoskins
Thursday, October 11, 2:30-3:30 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, October 12, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

Inclusive Excellence is a sprawling concept, and many instructors have difficulty getting a handle on what they might do to be part of it.  Deb Hoskins and Bill Cerbin have developed an online inventory of practices relevant to instructors’ roles that can help individuals gauge strengths and weaknesses, define goals, and develop a professional development plan that will benefit students.  The inventory is grounded in educational research that demonstrates the efficacy of a variety of practices. Respondents can receive an individual-level report related to important IE goals. Department-level reports are also available to facilitate collaboration and strategic planning.  In this session, you will learn how to take and how to use the IE Inventory.  

Brief Interventions that Improve Student Achievement
Bill Cerbin
Thursday, October 18, 8:00-9:00 a.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, October 19, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

Brief exercises that target students’ thoughts, feelings and beliefs in and about school have had striking effects on educational achievement even over months and years. For example, a study with Stanford undergraduates found that a one-hour session designed to buttress African-American college students’ sense of belonging in school increased their GPA’s over the next three years, and they were more likely to be in the top 25% of their college class. This session will explore several types of high-impact interventions and discuss ways that instructors and programs could use them to help boost student achievement.

When and Why: Blogs vs. Wikis
Jen Snook
Thursday, October 25, 2:15-3:15 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, October 26 1:30-2:30 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

This session will share various types of assignments and activities that can be used with both blogs and wikis, while discussing the practicality of various approaches and technologies.  Time will be devoted to discussing considerations for assessing student work done in blogs and wikis.  Come prepared to share your ideas and collaborate with your peers on ideas for blog and wiki integration in your classroom.

Student Perspectives on Writing
Bryan Kopp and Patrick Barlow
Thursday, November 1, 2:15-3:15 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, November 2, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

In the spring semester of 2012, all UW-L undergraduate students were asked to share their perceptions of writing instruction, their sense of improvement in writing, and their writing habits.  The results of this survey provide the first university-wide picture of how students view their writing experiences.  This session will highlight key findings for freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors across the disciplines.  Instructors in writing-intensive courses and programs are invited to use survey results for teaching improvement and assessment planning.

Investigation of Student Engagement at the Course Level (CLASSE)

Patrick Barlow
Thursday, November 8, 2:30-3:30 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, November 9, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall


The CLASSE (Classroom Survey of Student Engagement) is a tool that measures how often students engage in critical learning behaviors in a course. This session will review the actual survey, discuss the types of information you can assess, and explore how you might use the CLASSE in your courses.
   

Self and Peer Evaluation of Online Courses
Brian Udermann
Thursday, November 15, 9:30-10:15a.m.,161 Wing Technology Center

Friday, November 16, 1:30-2:15 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

Roughly 100 Faculty and Instructional Academic Staff have developed and taught online courses at UW-L over the past five years.  In response to the growth in online offerings, individuals in CATL have developed and shared tools that can be used for self and peer evaluation purposes.  This workshop will explore how instructors can use the UW-L Online Course Evaluation Guidelines to help design their online courses as well as evaluate the delivery of their online courses after they have been taught.  Additionally, we will discuss and share resources that can be used to conduct peer evaluations (instructor to instructor) of online courses.

D2L Objectives and Competencies
Cari Mathwig Ramseier (Academic Technology Services), Jen Snook, Bill Cerbin, Patrick Barlow (CATL)
Thursday, November 29,  2:15-3:45 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, November 30, 1:30-3:00 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

In D2L, the Competencies tool is used to track a user's knowledge and skill development on a chosen topic. Competencies in D2L are made up of three components: activities that users complete to acquire knowledge or skill (such as Dropbox assignment, quiz, or discussion); learning objectives that measure whether the skill or knowledge was acquired; and competencies/objectives that are achieved when learning objectives are completed.  Intended for users who are comfortable using all of the default tools in D2L, including Rubrics and Grades, this session will help you begin to set up your own course/program competencies and objectives in D2L, and share how this tool can be used as an instructional tool both for you and your students. Be sure to bring your own course/program objectives to add in to D2L.

Understanding and Enhancing Student Motivation

Bill Cerbin, Deb Hoskins, Brian Udermann
Thursday, December 6, 2:30-3:30 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, December 7, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center

Why do students . . . persist when faced with difficult tasks, give up, do just enough to get by, work tenaciously, obsess over grades, focus on avoiding failure, take academic risks, avoid academic risks? What accounts for motivation for learning, and what can instructors do to influence student motivation?  This session invites you to examine your assumptions about what motivates student learning, explore key factors that influence motivation, and discuss strategies instructors can use to support students’ effort and persistence.

Introduction to Lesson Study
Bill Cerbin and Bryan Kopp
Thursday, February 7, 2:15-3:15 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, February 8, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 3212 Centennial Hall

Lesson study is a type of classroom inquiry in which several instructors jointly design, teach, observe, analyze and refine a single class lesson in one of their courses. The goals are to better understand how students learn and to use that information to improve teaching. In this session you will learn about basic lesson study practices and about how you can become involved in doing lesson study with fellow teachers. To see recent examples of lesson studies by UW-L instructors go to
http://www.uwlax.edu/catl/lsp/.   

Writing and Critical Thinking: A Case Study
Bryan Kopp (CATL) & Darci Thoune (English)
Thursday, February 14, 2:15-3:30 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, February 15, 1:30-2:45 p.m., 161 Wing

Why do some students transform their knowledge when they write while others seem to be just “filling in the blanks”?   This session will highlight findings from a study of how three UW-L students responded to a writing assignment on the concept of sustainability.  One student reported that she “learned a lot but her ideas didn’t change”. How is this possible?  This session will share some answers and explore pedagogical implications for teachers across the disciplines.  Participants will watch video clips of actual student performances and discuss strategies for promoting critical thinking in writing assignments.

Beyond Google: Advanced Search Strategies to Enhance Your Teaching and Scholarship
Brian Udermann and Jen Snook
Thursday, February 21, 9:30-10:15 a.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, February 22, 1:30-2:15 p.m., 161 Wing

Google is a very powerful search engine and currently dominates the number of Internet searches conducted (roughly 70%).  However, Google might not always be the best choice when you consider the range of Internet search tools available.  There are hundreds of alternative search engines that can be used when trying to find information electronically.  This session will explore sites that can be used to perform blind comparisons on the three top search engines (Google, Yahoo!, Bing), search for videos, and search for discipline-specific information (Science, Arts, etc.).  We will even explore a search engine that contributes to your charity of choice for every search you conduct.  Bring your laptop or iPad as we will actively be conducting searches during this session.

Backward Design

Kristin Koepke and Jen Snook
Thursday, February 28, 2:15-4:15 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, March 1, 1:30p-3:30 p.m., 161 Wing

Backward design is an innovative and enlightening way to think about course design and redesign. In this workshop, participants will learn about the three phases of backward design:  (1) identify desired results, (2) determine acceptable evidence, and (3) plan learning experiences and instruction. Critical questions and activities will be presented to help attendees consider each phase of backward design in their course revision process.

Designing and Managing Collaborative Assignments
Deb Hoskins and Bryan Kopp
Thursday, March 7, 2:30-3:30pm , 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, March 8, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 161 Wing

Studies suggest that collaborative work enhances learning for all students, helps students develop competence in interacting with others who are not like themselves, and teaches students the collaborative skills they need to succeed in most contemporary workplaces.  But research also indicates that assignments that require students to work together over time only yields such benefits when they are very well designed and managed.  In this workshop, you will learn some principles for designing and managing collaborative assignments, and then delve into the complexities of implementation as you lay out a plan for an assignment in one of your courses.  

Tools for Program Level Assessment
Patrick Barlow
Thursday, March 14, 2:30-3:30 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, March 15, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 161 Wing

Assessment of learning at the course level, while challenging, is often a clearer task than when looking at the learning within an entire program.  This complexity may be dealt with through the design of a process and selection of tools/data streams that facilitate the effort and provide meaningful results.  This session will explore the general process of conducting assessment at the program level and highlight options for tools or procedures to help collect data for programmatic improvement.  Those tasked with coordinating assessment within their department are highly encouraged to attend.  

Twitter as an Assessment Tool
Jen Snook
Thursday, March 28, 2:15-3:15 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, March 29, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 161 Wing

Twitter is a very popular social media site that allows for microblogging, with posts that are limited to 140 characters. This type of message creation can have an interesting impact when used in the classroom to collect information on student progress and understanding of course concepts.  This session will present a few ways in which Twitter can be used in a Classroom Assessment Technique.

Using the Inclusive Excellence Inventory
Deb Hoskins
Thursday, April 11, 2:30-3:30 p.m., 161 Wing Technology Center
Friday, April 12, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 161 Wing

Inclusive Excellence is a sprawling concept, and many instructors have difficulty getting a handle on what they might do to be part of it.  Deb Hoskins and Bill Cerbin have developed an online inventory of practices relevant to instructors’ roles that can help individuals gauge strengths and weaknesses, define goals, and develop a professional development plan that will benefit students.  The inventory is grounded in educational research that demonstrates the efficacy of a variety of practices. Respondents can receive an individual-level report related to important IE goals. Department-level reports are also available to facilitate collaboration and strategic planning.  In this session, you will learn how to take and to use the IE Inventory.