CATL Winter Session Workshops
Instructors are invited to the CATL 2013 Winter Session Workshops to be held Thursday, January 17, 2013 in Centennial Hall (see ). The event will feature four workshops presented concurrently in the morning and then repeated in the afternoon. 

Each workshop consists of two segments:

Part 1: a 45-minute session involving background material and discussion of the topic
Part 2: a 90-minute working session in which participants plan and develop course materials

You may attend one or both parts of a workshop in the morning and afternoon.  To register, go to the online registration form at https://uwlacrosse.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3VgYsJHnNKeOM3X.

Workshop Title 9:00-9:45 am   10-11:30 am 1:00-1:45 pm 2:00-3:30 pm Room #
Designing Authentic Assignments         Part 1 Part 2 Part 1 Part 2 3212
Promoting Group Learning                      Part 1 Part 2 Part 1 Part 2 3214
Engaging Students in Large Classes Part 1 Part 2 Part 1 Part 2 n/a
Quick & Useful Class Assessment Tools Part 1 Part 2 Part 1 Part 2 3213



Designing Authentic Assignments
 Bryan Kopp, Writing Programs Coordinator, and Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
3212 Centennial Hall

We want students to be able to solve problems and think analytically, carefully, imaginatively—beyond the
classroom. Yet we know that students’ ability to use knowledge in new situations is limited. Authentic tasks
can be a bridge between school learning and real-life applications. They engage students in using knowledge
in “real-world” contexts, with genuine purposes, and audiences.

Part 1: This session explores the characteristics of authentic tasks and assignments. We will describe and show
examples of authentic assignments and then present guidelines for how to create and grade assignments
that give students more practice, feedback and guidance in using what they learn in the classroom to address
messy, complex, real-life problems.

Part 2: Participants will design a new or redesign an existing assignment and a grading rubric for their own
classes. Participants should bring a laptop or have access to course materials. During the session you will
design or redesign an authentic assignment and a grading rubric. We will discuss specific assignment examples
and provide feedback and recommendations for classroom use. Groups of participants will provide feedback.
Additional examples of good designs will be provided.                                                       

 

 

 

 

 













Promoting Group Learning
Deb Hoskins, Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
3214 Centennial Hall

Studies indicate that collaborative learning is a “high-impact practice,” especially for students from underrepresented groups when those experiences meet certain standards. But not all group learning experiences are well designed or effective. And, many students dislike and balk at doing group work.

Part 1: This session will help you understand what makes group assignments effective, explore ways to address some students’ dislike or misuse of such activities, and offer some general design ideas for organizing group work.

Part 2: Participants will design or redesign a group assignment using ideas from the earlier session. Please bring a laptop or have access to your course materials. Groups of participants will provide feedback. Additional examples of good designs will be provided.                                                       

















Engaging Students in Large Classes (cancelled)



Quick and Useful Classroom Assessment Tools
Patrick Barlow, Assessment Coordinator
3213 Centennial Hall


The idea of conducting assessment of student learning is often thought of as a complex process requiring much effort
with little immediate impact on the classroom.  But assessment can be used to collect feedback to improve learning.

Part 1: This session will focus on short, ungraded tasks that can be used in the classroom setting that help funnel information back to the instructors quickly to be used for gauging student learning and helping identify things to address in the next class session.

Part 2: This session will follow on the ideas of using short, ungraded processes to secure information to understand what students are learning in a course by having participants consider one or two of their most pressing questions about student learning and then create a couple strategies to help address those questions.  As time allows, participants will share these with the group and get some initial reactions from the other attendees with a goal of implementing them in their courses.