2014-2015 Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning
Workshop Schedule

Workshop Descriptions and Links to Registration Below
 

Fall 2014 Workshop Title Date Time Location
The Science of Learning 1: How Students Learn Sept 4 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
Facilitating Effective Online Discussions Sept 5 (Fri) 1:30-2:30p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 1: How Students Learn [repeat] Sept 11(Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
Classroom Observations of Student Learning Sept 12 (Fri) 1:30-2:30p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 2: Attention, Working Memory, Cognitive Load Sept 18 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
Creating and Delivering Online Content Sept 19 (Fri) 2:00-4:00p 17 Wing
The Science of Learning 2: Attention, Working Memory, Cognitive Load [repeat] Sept 25 (Thurs) 2:30-3:30p 153 Murphy
Improving Peer and Instructor Feedback on Writing Sept 26 (Fri) 1:30-3:00p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 3: Prior Knowledge, Misconceptions, Knowledge Construction Oct 2 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
Using Google Sites in Your Course Oct 3 (Fri) 2:00-4:00p 17 Wing
The Science of Learning 3: Prior Knowledge, Misconceptions, Knowledge Construction [repeat] Oct 9 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
How and Why to Design Student-Choice Assignments Oct 10 (Fri) 1:30-3:00p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 4: Shallow vs. Deep Learning Oct 16 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
E-Portfolios for Learning Outcomes Assessment Oct 17 (Fri) 1:30-3:00p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 4: Shallow vs. Deep Learning [repeat] Oct 23 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
NSSE 2014: Results from the new Effective Teaching Practices Indicator and Writing Experiences Module Oct 24 (Fri) 1:30-2:30p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 5: Development of Expertise and Transfer of Learning Oct 30 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
How to Give "Wise Feedback" Oct 31 (Fri) 1:30-2:30p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 5: Development of Expertise and Transfer of Learning [repeat] Nov 6 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
Introduction to Blended Learning Nov 7 (Fri) 2:00-3:30p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 6: Metacognition, Self-regulation, Learning Strategies Nov 13 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
Workshop TBA Nov 14 (Fri) TBA TBA
The Science of Learning 6: Metacognition, Self-regulation, Learning Strategies  [repeat] Nov 20 (Thurs) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
Time Management Tips for Teaching Online Nov 21 (Fri) 1:30-3:30p 153 Murphy
The Science of Learning 7: Mindsets, Motivation, Mistrust, Anxiety Dec 4 (Thurs) and Dec 5 (Fri) 2:30-4:00p 153 Murphy
Spring 2015 Workshop Title Date Time Location
Using Humor in the Classroom to Improve Learning Jan 30 (Fri) 1:30-2:30p 153 Murphy
First in your CLASSE: Investigation of Student Engagement at the Course Level (CLASSE) Feb 6 (Fri) 1:30-2:30p 153 Murphy
Online Teaching Showcase Feb 13 (Fri) 1:30-3:00p 153 Murphy
Working with Students with Disabilities Feb 20 (Fri) 1:30-3:00p 153 Murphy
TechBits Showcase Feb 27 (Fri) 1:30-3:30p 153 Murphy
Introduction to Lesson Study Mar 6 (Fri) 1:30-2:30p 153 Murphy
Working with English-Language Learners Mar 27 (Fri) 1:30-3:00p 153 Murphy
Backward Design Apr 3 (Fri) 2:00-3:30p 153 Murphy
Course Review and Revision 1: What and Why to Change Apr 9 (Thurs) 2:15-3:40p 153 Murphy
Course Review and Revision 2: Refreshing Your Assignments and Assessments Apr 16 (Thurs) 2:15-3:40p 153 Murphy
Course Review and Revision 3: Getting Students Ready for Assignments Apr 23 (Thurs) 2:15-3:40p 153 Murphy
Course Review and Revision 4: Moving Forward with Course Redesign Apr 30 (Thurs) 2:15-3:40p 153 Murphy


2014-2015 CATL Workshop Descriptions
(Click the links below to register for a session)

Date / Time / Place Fall 2014 Workshop Descriptions
Thursday September 4
2:30 - 4:00pm
153 Murphy Library

[repeated Sept 11]
Science of Learning 1: How Students Learn
Bill Cerbin, Director of CATL

It is important to clearly define the knowledge, skills and dispositions we want students to acquire. However by focusing mainly on what we want students to learn [outcomes] we may overlook the processes by which students get to the outcomes—the process of learning. Unless teachers understand how students learn or fail to learn, we have little basis for improving outcomes. This session explores principles and research findings about how students learn. We will examine cognitive processes involved in learning as well as cognitive barriers that derail learning.
Friday, September 5
1:30 - 2:30 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Facilitating Effective Online Discussions
Brian Udermann, Director of Online Education, CATL

Using discussions in online courses can be a very effective way to increase student to student and student to instructor interactions. However, there can be challenges associated with online discussions such as lack of student participation, disruptive students or the workload associated with reading and grading discussion posts. During this presentation you will be exposed to a variety of strategies to create discussion board activities that your students find interesting and also strategies to effectively facilitate discussions and manage the workload related to reading and grading posts.  
Thursday September 11
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeat of Sept 4]
Science of Learning 1: How Students Learn
Bill Cerbin, Director of CATL

It is important to clearly define the knowledge, skills and dispositions we want students to acquire. However by focusing mainly on what we want students to learn [outcomes] we may overlook the processes by which students get to the outcomes—the process of learning. Unless teachers understand how students learn or fail to learn, we have little basis for improving outcomes. This session explores principles and research findings about how students learn. We will examine cognitive processes involved in learning as well as cognitive barriers that derail learning.
Friday September 12
1:30-2:30 p.m.

153 Murphy Library
Classroom Observations of Student Learning
Bill Cerbin, Director of CATL

Classroom observations can be a valuable source of feedback for teachers, especially if they focus on student learning during the class period. In this session we explore strategies for observing student learning and behavior in the classroom. We consider strategies you can use to uncover how students are thinking about and interacting with the subject matter and with one another during class. We will discuss how to carry out low-stakes classroom observations in one another’s classes.
Thursday September 18
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeated Sept 25]
Science of Learning 2: Attention, Working Memory, Cognitive Load
Bill Cerbin, Director of CATL

To learn effectively students need to select, attend to, concentrate on and process new information. Learning suffers when students are distracted, their attention is divided, and when the amount of new information exceeds their processing capacity. Cognitive overload is a daily problem that limits student learning. This session focuses on the inherent limitations of attention and working memory and on what teachers can do to lighten the cognitive load students experience every day. Participants will develop a strategy during the session that can improve student learning by managing cognitive load in their classes.
Friday September 19
2:00-4:00 p.m.

17 Wing Technology Center
Creating and Delivering Online Courses
Jen Snook, Instructional Designer, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

This session explores ways to create different types of online video content and examines pedagogical reasons for using them. You could create: 1) mini-lectures to replace or supplement in-class lectures to free up in-class time for other purposes, 2) explanations of class assignments, 3) feedback to the class, 4) adjunct material for course readings, 5) follow-up information for students after class has met, 6) a glossary of core course concepts. We will explore these and other ways to enhance your teaching and student learning by adding your recorded voice and video to course material.
Thursday, September 25
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeat of Sept 18]
Science of Learning 2: Attention, Working Memory, Cognitive Load
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

To learn effectively students need to select, attend to, concentrate on and process new information. Learning suffers when students are distracted, their attention is divided, and when the amount of new information exceeds their processing capacity. Cognitive overload is a daily problem that limits student learning. This session focuses on the inherent limitations of attention and working memory and on what teachers can do to lighten the cognitive load students experience every day. Participants will develop a strategy during the session that can improve student learning by managing cognitive load in their classes.
Friday, September 26
1:30-3:00 p.m.

153 Murphy Library

Improving Peer and Instructor Feedback on Writing
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator

Many instructors report that giving feedback on writing is one of the most time-intensive aspects of their job. Having students review and comment on one another's work can significantly reduce the amount of time teachers need to devote to the task, but peer feedback can be uneven in quality. Student peer reviewers are notorious for giving praise ("nice work") and generic advice ("add more") rather than substantive feedback related to the goals of the assignment. Participants may attend one part or all of this session.

- Part 1: Student Peer Feedback - During the first 45 minutes of this session we will discuss strategies that improve peer feedback experiences and make it more likely that students receive the information they need to make revisions.

-  Part 2: Instructor Feedback - The final 45 minutes will be devoted to strategies that instructors can use to improve the quality of their own feedback and save time.

Thursday, October 2
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeated Oct 9]
Science of Learning 3: Prior Knowledge, Misconceptions, Knowledge Construction
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

What is a student’s most important asset for learning? Is it IQ, motivation, parents’ income, the quality of the schools attended? What matters most for new learning is what students already know about the subject—their prior knowledge. As one group of researchers concluded, students’ prior knowledge significantly influences what they notice about the situation, how they organize and interpret it. This affects their ability to remember, reason, solve problems, and acquire new knowledge (Bransford, Brown & Cocking, 1999). This session examines the role of prior knowledge in learning, and how teachers can uncover students’ prior knowledge and respond to prior knowledge problems such as poorly understood concepts, persistent student misconceptions, and gaps in prior knowledge.
Friday, October 3
2:00-4:00 p.m.

17 Wing Technology Center
Using Google Sites in Your Course
Jen Snook, Instructional Designer, CATL

Google Sites is a free, flexible, and secure way to share information, create community, and encourage student involvement in your course. In this workshop you will get hands-on experience with this application and explore ways to create projects and learning experiences such as blogs, wikis, and websites.
Thursday, October 9
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeat of Oct 2]
Science of Learning 3: Prior Knowledge, Misconceptions, Knowledge Construction
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

What is a student’s most important asset for learning? Is it IQ, motivation, parents’ income, the quality of the schools attended? What matters most for new learning is what students already know about the subject—their prior knowledge. As one group of researchers concluded, students’ prior knowledge significantly influences what they notice about the situation, how they organize and interpret it. This affects their ability to remember, reason, solve problems, and acquire new knowledge (Bransford, Brown & Cocking, 1999). This session examines the role of prior knowledge in learning, and how teachers can uncover students’ prior knowledge and respond to prior knowledge problems such as poorly understood concepts, persistent student misconceptions, and gaps in prior knowledge.
Friday, October 10
1:30-3:00 p.m.

153 Murphy Library
How and Why to Design Student-Choice Assignments
Kristin Koepke, Instructional Designer, CATL

Allowing a level of choice in how assignments are completed in the class can be a motivator for students and create a more engaging classroom environment. This workshop will discuss reasons to use student-choice in assignment design, highlight strategies to design such assignments, and share examples of student-choice assignments from courses at UW-La Crosse. The final part of the workshop will ask participants to engage in conversation with peers about assignments from their own courses that could employ an element of choice, while brainstorming concerns and corresponding solutions with the group.
Thursday, October 16
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeated Oct 23]
Science of Learning 4: Shallow vs. Deep Learning
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

Robust, durable learning is more likely to result from deep cognitive engagement in which students try to make sense of the subject matter. In contrast, students who simply memorize and review the material may spend a lot of time and effort only to learn very little. They may do well on tests but their knowledge is temporary, of little use and easily forgotten. This session explores the differences between shallow and deep processing, and on how teachers can create assignments, exercises and tasks that engage students in mental activities that lead to durable learning.
Friday, October 17
1:30-3:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
E-Portfolios for Learning Outcomes Assessment
Patrick Barlow, University Assessment Coordinator, Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning and Saundra Solum, Instructional Technology Coordinator, Academic Technology Services

Capturing student learning and development over the course of time is not an easy task.  Many academic departments on campus are using or planning to use ePortfolios to understand and improve student learning.  This session will review the kinds of assessment opportunities generated by the ePortfolio process as well as how D2L can be used to facilitate students' creation of ePortfolios. Some current examples from academic departments will be shared.
Thursday, October 23
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeat of Oct 16]
Science of Learning 4: Shallow vs. Deep Learning
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

Robust, durable learning is more likely to result from deep cognitive engagement in which students try to make sense of the subject matter. In contrast, students who simply review the material may spend a lot of time and effort only to learn very little. They may do well on tests but their knowledge is temporary, of little use and easily forgotten. This session explores the differences between shallow and deep processing, and on how teachers can create assignments, exercises and tasks that engage students in mental activities that lead to durable learning.
Friday, October 24
1:30-2:30 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
NSSE 2014: Results from the New Effective Teaching Practices Indicator and Writing Experiences Module
Patrick Barlow, Assessment Coordinator, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

This session will review UW-L's results from the 2014 NSSE survey as they apply to student perceptions of the learning activities they experienced and their reported gains in skills. For the first time NSSE included an Effective Teaching Practices Indicator that identified specific instructor behaviors related to feedback, organization, and use of examples to clarify class material. UW-L also administered the Experiences with Writing Module to understand how often students were asked to engage in tasks like providing peer feedback, engaging a particular audience, and summarizing numerical data in writing. The session will discuss these results and their implications for teaching on campus.
Thursday, October 30
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeated Nov 6]
Science of Learning 5: Development of Expertise and Transfer of Learning
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

Teachers often observe that students cannot apply what they have learned to new problems and situations. This is a common problem and a significant concern for teachers trying to help students build usable knowledge and expertise. This session focuses on understanding what makes transfer of learning difficult, and what teachers can do to support better transfer.
Friday, October 31
1:30-2:30 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
How to Give "Wise Feedback"
Deb Hoskins, Inclusive Excellence Coordinator, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning
 
Giving students constructive feedback is difficult. Research indicates that the way students interpret feedback plays an important role in whether they will use it and how they view themselves in the course. Some students interpret critical feedback that only points out problems, errors, and mistakes as an indication they are inadequate and do not belong in the course. Conversely, when students experience unwarranted positive feedback, e.g., praise for mediocre work, they begin to mistrust the teacher. "Wise feedback" is a simple technique that communicates the problems in students' work and also the teacher's belief that the student can improve his/her  performance. Research shows that students who receive wise feedback are more likely to use it to revise their work. In this workshop, participants will design a wise feedback statement and develop a plan for implementing it. Participants may wish to bring a laptop, especially those who give feedback to students through D2L.
Thursday, November 6
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeat of Oct 30]
Science of Learning 5: Development of Expertise and Transfer of Learning
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

Teachers often observe that students cannot apply what they have learned to new problems and situations. This is a common problem and a significant concern for teachers trying to help students build usable knowledge and expertise. This session focuses on understanding what makes transfer of learning difficult, and what teachers can do to support better transfer.
Friday, November 7
2:00-3:30 p.m.

153 Murphy Library
Introduction to Blended Learning
Jen Snook, Instructional Designer, Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning

This is an overview presentation about the possibilities and strategies in offering a blended (also called hybrid) course at UW-L. The presentation will define blended learning, explain the benefits of the blended course design approach, and discuss strategies for offering a quality blended course. Information will be provided about design considerations for blended courses and example course materials from blended courses will be shared. No experience with blended course design is needed to attend this introductory session.
Thursday, November 13
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeated Nov 20]
Science of Learning 6: Metacognition, Self-regulation, Learning Strategies
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

As students progress through school we expect them to become less dependent on teachers and to become more independent learners. This does happen, but not in all the ways we would hope. Many college students seem to be unaware of effective learning strategies, how to approach complex tasks, where the gaps are in their knowledge and skills, how to evaluate and improve their own learning. This session examines metacognition, self-regulation, and learning strategies as important components of independent learning. We will examine how teachers can promote the kind of self-regulation that leads to better learning.
Friday, November 14
Details TBA
Workshop TBA
Thursday, November 20
2:30-4:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library

[repeat of Nov 13]
Science of Learning 6: Metacognition, Self-regulation, Learning Strategies
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

As students progress through school we expect them to become less dependent on teachers and to become more independent learners. This does happen, but not in all the ways we would hope. Many college students seem to be unaware of effective learning strategies, how to approach complex tasks, where the gaps are in their knowledge and skills, how to evaluate and improve their own learning. This session examines metacognition, self-regulation, and learning strategies as important components of independent learning. We will examine how teachers can promote the kind of self-regulation that leads to better learning.
Friday, November 21
1:30-3:30 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Time Management Tips for Teaching Online
Kristin Koepke, Instructional Designer, CATL

Faculty who teach online often comment on the amount of time needed to be effective in that environment. It is true that online courses can be very time consuming. The first hour of this workshop will review some time management strategies and techniques that will help in offering your online course. A survey of UW-L online instructors helped generate the tips for this workshop. The second hour of the workshop will answer questions on how to use some of the technologies and D2L tools presented for time-saving approaches. If the second hour does not address all lingering questions, resources will be provided including names of people to contact for additional support. This session may be of particular interest to those teaching online in winter interim 2015.
Thursday, December 4 and
Friday, December 5
2:30-4:00 p.m.

153 Murphy Library
[Dec 4 event repeated Dec 5]
Science of Learning 7: Mindsets, Motivation, Mistrust, Anxiety
Bill Cerbin, Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning

We know that students’ motivation plays a significant role in their achievement. But what factors and conditions influence student motivation? Why do students persist when faced with difficult tasks, give up, do just enough to get by, work tenaciously, obsess over grades, focus on avoiding failure, take or avoid academic risks? This session examines some of the key factors that influence students’ effort and persistence in learning, and strategies instructors can use to support students' motivation.
Date / Time / Place Spring 2015 Workshop Descriptions
Friday, January 30
1:30-2:30 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Using Humor in the Classroom to Improve Learning
Brian Udermann, Director of Online Learning, CATL

Instructors are continually searching for ways to engage and inspire their students and create a more positive learning environment. Is it possible that using humor in the classroom might help achieve this? The purpose of this workshop is to explore the research that has been conducted and published examining how humor in the classroom impacts learning. Participants will also discuss a variety of strategies they could employ to incorporate more humor into their teaching.
Friday, February 6
1:30-2:30 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
First in Your CLASSE: Investigation of Student Engagement at the Course Level
Patrick Barlow, University Assessment Coordinator, CATL

The CLASSE (Classroom Survey of Student Engagement) is a tool that measures how often students engage in critical learning behaviors in a course. This session will review the actual survey, discuss the types of information you can assess, and explore how you might use the CLASSE in your courses. Some examples of insights from our current use of the tool will be shared.
Friday, February 13
1:30-3:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Online Teaching Showcase
Brian Udermann, Director of Online Learning, CATL

The Online Teaching Showcase will highlight and share exceptional teaching practices used by UW-L faculty in the online learning environment. The showcase will feature technologies, tools and instructional strategies that encourage critical thinking, collaboration and community building in online courses. This is a unique opportunity to see examples of various activities and content delivery methods used by a variety of online instructors. Presenters will explain how a particular area of their course works, show the assignment or area (including technology), and discuss benefits to student learning.
Friday, February 20
1:30-3:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Working with Students with Disabilities
Deb Hoskins, Inclusive Excellence Coordinator, CATL

Students with disabilities report that the accommodations instructors provide do not always work as expected. This session will examine good strategies to implement several of the most common accommodations used by Disability Resource Services, and explore ways to implement universal design principles that will make other aspects of your course more accessible. Participants will leave with at least one implementation plan.
Friday, February 27
1:30-3:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
TechBits Showcase
Kristin Koepke, Instructional Designer, CATL

CATL TechBits is a monthly series in which UWL instructors describe how they use technology in their teaching and research. This session will showcase several technologies from the TechBit series. Presenters will give brief demonstrations and how describe how they use a technology in their teaching and/or research.
Friday, March 6
1:30-3:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Introduction to Lesson Study
Bill Cerbin, Director of CATL and Bryan Kopp, Writing Programs Coordinator, CATL

Lesson study is a type of classroom inquiry in which several instructors jointly design, teach, observe, analyze and refine a single class lesson in one of their courses. The goals are to better understand how students learn and to use that information to improve teaching. In this session you will learn about basic lesson study practices and about how you can become involved in doing lesson study with several colleagues. To see recent examples of lesson studies by UW-L instructors go to http://www.uwlax.edu/catl/lsp/.
Friday, March 27
1:30-3:00 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Working with English Language Learners
Bryan Kopp, Writing Programs Coordinator, CATL
Deb Hoskins, Inclusive Excellence Coordinator, CATL
Jay Lokken, Director of International Education

Students whose first language is not English, especially those whose time in the U.S. has been brief, face a multitude of learning tasks that other students do not face. What should instructors consider in designing written assignments? And how can instructors help students develop their skills at writing in English? This workshop will focus on strategies for designing assignments and providing usable feedback and practice for English language learners.
Friday, April 3
2:00-3:30 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Backward Design
Jen Snook, Instructional Designer, CATL

Backward design is an instructional design model based on deliberate and focused course planning for student understanding and transfer of learning. In this workshop, participants will learn about the three phases of backward design: (1) identify desired results, (2) determine acceptable evidence, and (3) plan learning experiences and instruction. Critical questions and activities will be presented to help attendees consider each phase of backward design in their course revision process.
Thursday, April 9
2:15-3:40 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Course Review and Revision 1: What and Why to Change
Kristin Koepke, Instructional Designer, CATL

Making changes to a course can be a challenging process. In this session we will focus on why and when it is important to make revisions to a course, and examine areas to look for evidence to help prioritize course revisions. During the workshop participants will work on defining ways to examine and review evidence about the need for revisions.
Thursday, April 16
2:15-3:40 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Course Review and Revision 2: Refreshing Your Assignments and Assessments
Kristin Koepke, Instructional Designer, CATL

This session will focus on how to refresh your assignments and assessments based on the evidence explored in Part 1. In particular, this session will discuss creating clear directions, explaining expectations, defining grading criteria, and strategies for question design. Participants will be asked to bring an assignment to redesign or revise during the workshop.
Thursday, April 23
2:15-3:40 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Course Review and Revision 3: Getting Students Ready for Assignments
Kristin Koepke, Instructional Designer, CATL

This session will discuss considerations for scaffolding student learning that may impact the assignments and assessments explored in Part 2. Participants will investigate various types of in-class practice activities to help scaffold student learning. During the session, participants will design or redesign an in-class activity to be more aligned with assignment expectations.
Thursday, April 30
2:15-3:40 p.m.
153 Murphy Library
Course Review and Revision 4: Moving Forward with Course Redesign
Kristin Koepke, Instructional Designer, CATL

With any course revisions, it is important to prioritize changes and plan how those changes will impact your overall course objectives and design. This session will share strategies to think about prioritizing changes in design, consider the process for changes explored in Parts 1-3, and finally delve into syllabus edits to match the redesign. Participants will prioritize and draft a course revision plan that can be implemented over the summer for a fall course offering.

Questions, comments, concerns? 
Contact catl@uwlax.edu