Graduate Curriculum Committee Minutes
Tuesday, December 4, 2001

Members Present: Uphoff, Krueger, Kuffel, Frye, Krajewski, Kelley, Koppelman, Simpson, Matchett, McCannon, Hunt, Wilder, Shober (Student Association representative)
Members Absent: Skalecki, Kaufman
Consultants: James Finch, Charles Martin-Stanley, Mandi Anderson, R. Dan Duquette, Diane Schumacher
Guests: Carol McCoy, Pat DiRocco, Travis McBride, Jeff Steffen, Rick Mikat, Delores Heiden, Carol Angell, Mike Winfrey, Steve Callister, Tom Hench, Amelia Dittman, Judy Holloway

1. Announcements – none

2. M/S/P to approve the minutes of November 20, 2001.

3. Second Readings – none

4. First Reading, Proposal #4, MLS 425/525 Molecular Pathology and MLS 430/530 Medical Laboratory Management and Education, new courses-changed to slash courses.

MLS 425/525, Molecular Pathology, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“A course on the composition, structure, function, and characteristics of DNA. Emphasis will be placed on clinical laboratory methods used to isolate, amplify, manipulate, and analyze DNA sequences in order to integrate theory and practice. Lect. 70, Lab. 28. Prerequisites: admission to M.S. Biology: Clinical Microbiology; admission to MLS Program.”

MLS 430/530, Medical Laboratory Management and Education, 2 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“A course designed to introduce the student to the principles of laboratory administration. The seminar-format course will focus on human resource management, financial management, operations management, and education methodologies appropriate for the supervisor and laboratory manager. Prerequisite: acceptance into M.S. Biology: Clinical Microbiology or admission to MLS Program.”

MLS 525 will be an elective in the M.S-Biology: Clinical Microbiology program, and MLS 530 will be a required course rather than MIC 752, which will be deleted. Both of these courses are offered at the undergraduate level.

M/S/P to waive the second reading and approve the proposal with minor editorial changes.

5. First Reading, Proposal #5, Exercise and Sport Science – Sport Administration, Physical Education Teaching, and Human Performance, ESS 750, 751, ESS 725, changes effective fall 2002.

Exercise and Sport Science — Sport Administration, title and required courses
Change title from ESS General-Sport Administration Option to ESS-Sport Administration Program. Delete EFN 736 from Category A Non-Thesis Option required courses and add EFN 730.

ESS—Sport Administration; ESS—Physical Education Teaching; ESS—Human Performance
Remove “GENERAL” from program designations, catalog page 41. All ESS programs will be separate: ESS-Sport Administration; ESS—Physical Education Teaching; ESS—Human Performance.

Exercise and Sport Science—Physical Education Teaching, credits, title, and addition of two new emphases, effective fall 2002.
Eliminate separate ESS Special (Adapted) program and offer it as an emphasis within the PE teaching program.
“Physical Education Teaching Option"
The Teaching Option is designed as a practitioner-oriented program for physical education teaching professionals seeking additional qualifications and expertise in such areas as teaching methods and styles, new and innovative curricular design, analysis of effective teaching, supervision, adventure, special populations, health as a lifestyle, and outdoor physical education.  Students may select either the thesis option (32 credits) or non-thesis option (32 credits). Students choosing the non-thesis option must successfully apply for and complete comprehensive written exams in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science. The Physical Education teaching option does not result in a K-12 teaching certificate.  Additional coursework may be required based on previously completed undergraduate coursework.  A minimum of half of the credits must be earned in 700 level courses.

Prerequisites or equivalents are:

1. Undergraduate major/minor in physical education and/or sport
science/management from an accredited four-year institution.
2. Documented coursework in the following areas:
· anatomy/physiology
· measurement and evaluation in physical education
· adapted physical education
· motor development/behavior/child development

Category A

RESEARCH:  Thesis Option:  (12 credits)
EFN 730 Introduction to Research   3 cr.
EFN 735 Interpretation of Statistical Data  3 cr.
EFN 799 Thesis     6 cr.

Non-Thesis Option:  (6-9 credits)
EFN 730 Introduction to Research   3 cr.
EFN 752 Assessment in PE/Athletics  3 cr.
ESS 736 Critical Analysis    3 cr. (special populations only)
Written Comprehensive Exam

Category B – Core Requirements (10 credits)

ESS 737 Curriculum Design   3 cr.
ESS 759 Analysis/Supervision   3 cr.
ESS 771 Current Issues in PE   2 cr.
ESS 725 Diversity in the Physical Activity Setting 2 cr.

Category C – Electives

Thesis Option – 10 credits
Non-thesis Option – 16 elective credits
Elective courses must be related to the field of teaching. Courses can be selected from a variety of courses offered in ESS, HED, SHE, CHE, and/or EFN. All electives must be pre-approved by the program director.

*Up to 6 (six) credits of ESS 560, Clinical Forum, will count toward this option.

EMPHASIS OPTIONS
Adventure/Outdoor Pursuits:  (16 cr.)
 ESS 745 Pedagogy of Outdoor Physical Education  3 cr.
 ESS 765 Adventure Theory     3 cr.
 ESS 777 Seminar in Adventure/Research    2 cr.
 ESS 778 Practicum in Adventure/Outdoor Pursuits   2 cr.
 Electives      6 cr. – non-thesis option

 Special Populations:  (16 cr.)
 ESS 530 Cause and Effect      4 cr.
 ESS 765 Adventure Theory     3 cr.
 ESS 787 Clinical Internship     3 cr.
 ESS 792 Seminar:  Special PE     3 cr.
 Electives      3 cr. – non-thesis option

 Health as a Lifestyle:  (16 cr.)
 SHE 705  Essentials of Health and Wellness    4 cr.
 SHE 715  Health Education Curriculum and Pedagogy  3 cr.
 SHE 720  Youth and Adolescent Issues    3 cr.
 Electives       6 cr. – non-thesis option

Special Populations and Health as a Lifestyle are new emphases.

ESS 725, Diversity in the Physical Activity Setting, 2 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“The class will address racial, ethnic, sexual orientation, and disability issues for which physical education teachers should have an awareness. The purpose of the course will be to sensitize the students to the fact that diversity is part of life in America and that a teacher needs to recognize that differences need to be understood and reflected upon so that the teacher can help all students have a positive educational experience. Pedagogical methods for integrating students will be addressed, such as inclusion techniques for students with a disability, culturally diverse games, and appropriate behavior management techniques. Offered Sem. II.”

ESS 750, Mechanics and Analysis of Movement, 3 credits, title, description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This course is designed to provide a mechanical understanding of human biological systems. Mechanical principles, laws, and equations will be studied and applied to human movement in exercise and sport activities. Quantitative analysis techniques will be introduced and biomechanical assessment of various exercises and sports will be performed. Prerequisites: ESS 303 or equivalent, MTH 151 or equivalent. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 751, Advanced Biomechanics, 3 credits, title, description, effective fall 2002.
“This course is designed to teach proficiency in quantifying and analyzing human movement activities. Advanced techniques in videography and force plate analysis will be covered. Utilization of biomechanical techniques for research activities will be a primary focus. Prerequisite: ESS 750. Offered Sem. II.

Exercise and Sport Science — Human Performance, add  two new emphases 1) Strength and Conditioning and 2) Research; (old HP program will now be called fitness emphasis) effective fall 2002.
“The Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Science – Human Performance is a multidisciplinary program of advanced study designed to prepare graduates for a career in one of the following areas: 1) fitness, 2) strength and conditioning, or 3) research, emphasizing either exercise physiology or biomechanics. Students will select one of these emphasis areas upon entry to the degree program. A minimum of one-half of the credits must be earned in 700 level courses. A Concentration in Athletic Training is also available with the Human Performance program.

Graduate Preparation Goals:
Serve as fitness professional in health club, fitness facility or corporate fitness facility
Serve as head or assistant strength & conditioning coach for DI, DII or DIII university sports or professional and semi-professional sports
Pursue a career as an exercise scientist (teaching and research at the university level)

Fitness Emphasis (Thesis or Non-Thesis): Students choosing the non-thesis option must successfully complete written comprehensive examinations at the end of their program.

Prerequisite Courses (or equivalent) and Requirements for Admission:
GRE Scores
ESS 205 Human Anatomy
ESS 206 Human Physiology
ESS 302 Physiology of Exercise
ESS 303 Biomechanics

  Course Requirements:
  Category A – Research
  Thesis Option (12 Credits)
  EFN 730 Introduction to Research    3 cr.
  EFN 735 Interpretation of Statistical Data   3 cr.
  ESS 799 Research: Master’s Thesis   6 cr.

  Non-Thesis Option (6 Credits)
  EFN 730 Introduction to Research     3 cr.
    and
  EFN 735 Interpretation of Statistical Data    3 cr.
or
  ESS 752 Assessment of Physical Education & Athletics  3 cr.

  Category B – Core Requirements (13-15 Credits)
  ESS 749 Psychological Aspects of Sport      3 cr.
  ESS 750 Mechanics & Analysis of Movement     3 cr.
  ESS 751 Advanced Biomechanics       3 cr.
  ESS 761 Lab Techniques in Human Performance – Biomechanics   2 cr.
  ESS 762 Lab Techniques in Human Performance – Exercise Physiology  3 cr.
  ESS 763 Lab Techniques in Human Performance – Motor Learning   2 cr.
  ESS 768 Psychomotor Bases of Skilled Performance     3 cr.
  ESS 770 Physiology of Activity       3 cr.

Category C – Electives*   (Thesis Option 7-9 Credits)
(Non-Thesis Option 13-15 Credits)
ESS 545 Planning Facilities in Physical Activity and Sport    3 cr.
ESS 560 EMG Kinesiology       3 cr.
ESS 680 Injury Prevention, Management and Rehabilitation    2 cr.
ESS 730 Athletic Activity Injury/Illness Evaluation     3 cr.
ESS 731 Rehabilitation of Athletic Musculoskeletal     3 cr.
ESS 732 Advanced Athletic Activity Injury Management    3 cr.
ESS 733 Advanced Athletic Training Clinical     2 cr. max of 4)
ESS 739 Current Issues in Sport Law      3 cr.
ESS 742 Perceptual Motor Development of Children     3 cr.
ESS 766 Sports in American Culture      3 cr.
ESS 769 Application of Muscle Physiology to Strength/Power Training  3 cr
ESS 784 Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology     3 cr.
ESS 789 Internship: Human Performance      3 cr.
  **ESS 794 Readings in Sports Psychology      1-3 cr.
ESS 795 Independent Study       1-3 cr. max of 6
  **ESS 796 Readings in Biomechanics      1-3 cr.
  **ESS 797 Readings in Exercise Physiology     1-3 cr.
  **ESS 798 Readings in Motor Learning      1-3 cr.
BIO 718 Advanced Human Physiology I      4 cr.
BIO 719 Advanced Human Physiology II      4 cr.
BIO 524 Endocrinology        3 cr.
BIO 535 Molecular Biology       3 cr.
BIO 565 Principles of Neurobiology      3 cr.

* Other courses may be selected with the consent of the program director.
** Total combined credits for all readings classes may be no greater than three.

Strength & Conditioning Emphasis (Non-Thesis Only) (Capstone internship is required.)
Prerequisite Courses (or equivalent) and Requirements for Admission:
GRE Scores
ESS 205 Human Anatomy
ESS 206 Human Physiology
ESS 302 Physiology of Exercise
ESS 303 Biomechanics
ESS 368 Strength Training Theory & Techniques
Two Letters of Recommendation
CSCS Preferred

Course Requirements:
Category A – Research (6 Credits)
EFN 730 Introduction to Research     3 cr.
ESS 752 Assessment of Physical Education & Athletics  3 cr.

Category B – Core Requirements (24 Credits)
ESS 545 Planning Facilities in Physical Activity and Sport  3 cr.
ESS 702 Sport Administration     3 cr.
ESS 738 Financial Management for Sport Programs   3 cr.
ESS 749 Psychological Aspects of Sport    3 cr.
ESS 750 Mechanics & Analysis of Movement   3 cr.
ESS 769 Application of Muscle Physiology to Strength/Power Training  3 cr.
ESS 770 Physiology of Activity     3 cr.
ESS 789 Internship: Human Performance    3 cr.

Category C – Electives (2 Credits Minimum)
ESS 768 Psychomotor Bases of Skilled Performance   3 cr.
ESS 739 Current Issues in Sport Law    3 cr.
ESS 754 Sport Marketing      3 cr.
ESS 760 Problems in Athletics     3 cr.
ESS 766 Sports in American Culture    3 cr.
ESS 795 Independent Study     1-3 cr., max of 6

Research Emphasis (Thesis Only)

Prerequisite Courses (or equivalent) and Requirements for Admission:
(Exercise Physiology)
GRE Scores
ESS 205 Human Anatomy
ESS 206 Human Physiology
ESS 302 Physiology of Exercise
ESS 303 Biomechanics
BIO 315 Cell Biology
CHM 103, 104 General Chemistry I, II
CHM 303 Organic Chemistry I
Two Letters of Recommendation
Graduate Faculty (UW-L) Letter of Intent for Mentorship

Prerequisite Courses (or equivalent) and Requirements for Admission:
(Biomechanics)
GRE Scores
ESS 205 Human Anatomy
ESS 303 Biomechanics
CHM 103, 104 General Chemistry I, II
MTH 207 Calculus I
PHY 103, 104 Fundamental Physics I, II
Two Letters of Recommendation
Graduate Faculty (UW-L) Letter of Intent for Mentorship

  Course Requirements: Both Options
  Category A – Research (12 Credits)
  EFN 730 Introduction to Research   3 cr.
  EFN 735 Interpretation of Statistical Data  3 cr.
  ESS 799 Research: Master’s Thesis  6 cr.

Category B – Core Requirements (20 Credits) for Exercise Physiology
ESS 762 Lab Techniques in Human Performance – Exercise Physiology  3 cr.
ESS 770 Physiology of Activity       3 cr.
ESS 769 Application of Muscle Physiology to Strength/Power Training  3 cr.
ESS 789 Internship: Human Performance     3 cr. – min. 120 hrs.
BIO 718 Advanced Human Physiology I      4 cr.
BIO 719 Advanced Human Physiology II      4 cr.
#Note: Internship must be in approved external research facility

Category B – Core Requirements (17 Credits) for Biomechanics
ESS 560 EMG Kinesiology    3 cr.
ESS 750 Mechanics & Analysis of Movement  3 cr.
ESS 751 Advanced Biomechanics    3 cr.
ESS 761 Lab Techniques in Human Performance – Biomechanics  2 cr.
ESS 789 Internship: Human Performance   3 cr. – minimum of 120 hrs.
ESS 796 Readings in Biomechanics   3 cr.
#Note: Internship must be in approved external research facility

Category C – Related Requirements (7 Credits) for Exercise Physiology
BIO 524 Endocrinology     3 cr.
BIO 535 Molecular Biology    3 cr.
BIO 536 Molecular Biology Laboratory   1 cr.

Category C – Related Requirements (11 Credits Minimum) for Biomechanics
ESS 763 Lab Techniques in Human Performance – Motor Learning   2 cr.
ESS 768 Psychomotor Bases of Skilled Performance     3 cr.
ESS 769 Application of Muscle Physiology to Strength/Power Training  3 cr.
BIO 565 Principles of Neurobiology      3 cr.

This proposal adds two new emphases in the ESS — Physical Education Teaching Option: 1) Special Populations, which used to be a separate program, and 2) Health as a Lifestyle (Adventure Education is currently a concentration within that option); organizes the ESS—Human Performance program into 3 emphases, 1) Fitness 2) Strength and Conditioning 3) Research  in an effort to help students focus better; adds a diversity course in the core requirements for PE teaching; and makes numerous changes to courses. It was noted that ”emphasis” would be more appropriate than “concentration” and the dept agreed. GCC recommended the following: 1) clarifying the description for the ESS-Human Performance Exercise Physiology and Biomechanic options by separating them out, 2) including the topic of social class in ESS 725, 3) refining the outlines for ESS 750 & 751, 4) contacting the Biology chair regarding the required courses in the exercise physiology emphasis, 5) revising the introductory paragraph in Human Performance to include the two research options and mention something about it being geared toward students interested in pursuing a PhD, and 6) clarifying that an emphasis is NOT required for the PE teaching program.

This was a first reading. There will be a second reading..

6. First Reading, Proposal #6, Special Education Graduate Program

Special Education Graduate Program required courses, additional certification options, effective fall 2002, retroactive to fall 2000.

“The graduate program in Special Education is designed for classroom teachers and special needs, who seek greater expertise in teaching students.  Certification or certifiability to teach at either the Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence or Early Adolescence/Adolescence level, admission to the Graduate School, completion of the Graduate Record Examination or Miller Analogy Test, and completion of program application forms are required for entry into the program.  To complete degree requirements, students must elect one of the following program options:

Option A: Thesis Option   30 semester credits including completion of a Master's Thesis
Option B: Seminar Paper   30 semester credits including completion of a Seminar Paper
Option C: Comprehensive Examination 36 semester credits and successful completion of a three-hour
       comprehensive examination.

At least one-half of all credits (Options A-C) must be earned in 700-level courses.  Candidates must supplement Option choice with courses from the Certification Requirement or Elective Course sections.  Candidates selecting the thesis or seminar paper option must begin work on their papers with an adviser at least two terms prior term in which they expect to graduate.  Candidates selecting the comprehensive examination option must schedule their comprehensive examination with the program director one semester prior to the semester in which they expect to graduate.

OPTION A: Thesis Option
SPE 715 Special Education Law    3 credits
RDG 730 Remedial Reading    3 credits
EFN 760 Theory & Practice in Educational Research  3 credits
  or
RDG 762 Reading Theory & Research   3 credits
SPE 799 Research: Master's Thesis    6 credits (maximum)

OPTION B: Seminar Paper Option
SPE 715 Special Education Law    3 credits
RDG 730 Remedial Reading    3 credits
EFN 760 Theory & Practice in Educational Research  3 credits
  or
RDG 762 Reading Theory & Research   3 credits
SPE 761 Seminar Paper     2 credits
OPTION C: Comprehensive Examination Option
SPE 715 Special Education Law    3 credits
RDG 730 Remedial Reading    3 credits
EFN 760 Theory & Practice in Educational Research  3 credits
  or
RDG 762 Reading Theory & Research   3 credits
SPE 780 Seminar in Special Education   3 credits

ELECTIVE COURSES:
PSY 752 Assessment and Remediation: Learning & Behavior Problems I  3 credtis
PSY 753 Assessment and Remediation: Learning & Behavior Problems II  3 credits
PSY 775 Cognitive/Behavioral Interventions     3 credits
SPY 700 School Psychology: Role & Function     2 credits
PSY 754 Concepts & Applications of Pupil Services    2 credits
PSY 756 Early Childhood Assessment      3 credits
SPY 757 Intellectual Assessment: Theory & Applications   2 credits
PSY 717 Behavior Disorders in Children     3 credits
REC 701 Philosophical Foundations of Leisure, Play, & Recreation  3 credits
EFN 715 Issues & Trends in Education      3 credits
CI 751 Teacher Inquiry: Assessing Class Practice    3 credits

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS:
Students seeking special education certification have two age-level options: Cross-Categorical Special Education--Middle Childhood/Adolescence or Cross-Categorical Special Education--Early Adolescence/ Adolescence.  Candidates in a Master's Degree program option may supplement with certification courses, but must abide by the 700-level course policy.

Non-degree Students: Candidates who seek cross-categorical special education licensure-only may do so by completing the certification requirements below.  This is not a degree seeking option.

Special Education certification requires the completion of the following:
 1) All Core Courses
 2) At Least one Certification Option
 a. Cross-Categorical Special Education--Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence
 b. Cross-Categorical Special Education--Early Adolescence/Adolescence
 3) Special Education Professional Practice

CORE COURSES: 15 credits   (All core courses are required for each Certification Option.)
SPE 524 Classroom Management & Positive Behavior Practices   3 credits
SPE 531 Language Development & Disorders     3 credits
SPE 540 Collaboration & Transition: From School-to-Community  3 credits
SPE 552 Individual Assessment      3 credits
SPE 529 Inclusive Strategies for the Classroom     3 credits

CERTIFICATION OPTIONS:
Option 1: Cross-Categorical Special Education—Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence Courses: (7 credits)
SPE 516 Introduction to Cross-Categorical Special Educ.—Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence 3 credits
SPE 546 Methods in Cross-Categorical Special Education—Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence 3 credits
SPE 561 Clinical in Special Education        1 credit

Professional Practice: (5 credits)
SPE 783 Student Teaching: Cross-Categorical Special Education—Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence   3 credits
SPE 786 Seminar in Cross-Categorical Special Education
 2 credits

Option 2: Cross-Categorical Special Education--Early Adolescence/Adolescence Courses:  (7 credits)
SPE 516 Introduction to Cross-Categorical Special Education
 3 credits
SPE 547 Methods in Cross-Categorical Special Education--Early Adolescence/Adolescence
 3 credits
SPE 561 Clinical in Special Education
 1 credit

Professional Practice: (5 credits)
SPE 784 Student Teaching: Cross-Categorical Special Education—Early Adolescence/Adolescence 3 credits
SPE 786 Seminar in Cross Categorical Special Education     2 credits

Course Deletions:
SPE 417/517
SPE 418/518
SPE 420/520
SPE 425/525
SPE 428/528
SPE 445/545
SPE 453/553
SPE 781, 782,

SPE 401/501, Introduction to Exceptional Individuals, 3 credits, title and description, effective fall 2002.
“This course is a general survey of exceptional individuals (disabled and gifted) from birth to 21 years of age. It provides an introduction to special education including history, law, definitions and classification systems, characteristics, etiology, provision of services and educational interventions and procedures related to the various disabilities covered under the law. Prerequisites: junior standing and admission to Teacher Education program.”

SPE 416/516, Introduction to Cross-Categorical Special Education Characteristics, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course is an introductory course about students with disabilities including Cognitive Disabilities, Specific Learning Disabilities, and/or Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities. The course focuses on historical, legal (federal and state statutes), and theoretical foundations of these categorical areas. Identification, definitions, classification systems, learning characteristics, models of intervention, and various placement settings are discussed. Prerequisites: admission to Teacher Education Program; SPE 401/501.

SPE 424/524, Classroom Management and Positive Behavior Practices, 3 credits, title, description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This course is designed to provide intervention methods and strategies for classroom management as well as positive behavior intervention. The course provides theoretical foundations and practical applications for preventing behavior problems, and for intervening when problems occur. Prerequisites: junior standing and admission to Teacher Education program; SPE 401/501.”

SPE 429/529, Inclusive Strategies for the Classroom, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course provides a foundation knowledge and best practice techniques for inclusion of diverse learners within the general education classroom. Course topics will focus on principles of inclusion, needs of diverse learners within the general education classroom, creation of supportive inclusive environments, transitions to inclusive environments, and specific academic area requirements (material selection, expectations, modifications/adaptations, and teaching aides) with regard to inclusion of students with special needs. Prerequisites: junior standing and admission to Teacher Education program; SPE 401/501.”

SPE 430/530, Seminar in Special Education, 1 credit, title, instructional pattern, description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This course provides students, currently student teaching, to have directed discussions regarding issues that are occurring in the special education or inclusionary general classroom settings. Students will meet on campus to discuss their experiences with other students having similar learning experiences. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Minor core courses; completion of all general education licensure requirements for student teaching; to be taken concurrently with SPE 446/546 or SPE 447/547, SPE 483/583 or SPE 484/584, and SPE 461/561. This course is designed for persons seeking initial teaching licensure in general education and cross-categorical special education. Pass/Fail grading.”

SPE 431/531, Language Development and Disorders, 3 credits, description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This course is an introductory course to the stages of normal language development from infancy through later adolescence, including the language factors (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) in receptive and expressive language. The course also focuses on the specific language characteristics and problems of students with disabilities and the impact on language-based academics. Prerequisites: EFN 210 and C-I 211.”

SPE 440/540, Collaboration and Transition: from School to Community, 3 credits, title, description, prerequisites (formerly 440 and 445), 3 credits, effective fall 2002.
“This course is designed for preparing teachers to collaborate and problem-solve as members of educational teams composed of professionals, agency, representatives, and parents. This course focuses on the development of transition plans for adolescents with Specific Learning Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, and Cognitive Disabilities; and the plan’s impact on educational curriculum and instructional practices, career development and placement practices. Responsibilities of the teacher as a collaborative team member will be covered. Prerequisites: junior standing and admission to Teacher Education program; SPE 401/501; SPE 416/516. Offered summer session.”

SPE 446/546, Methods in Cross-Categorical Special Education-Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course focuses on curriculum, methods and strategies used in educating students with disabilities (Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, Specific Learning Disabilities, and Cognitive Disabilities) at the Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence age level in a variety of educational placements. Topics covered within this course include academic instruction, positive behavior interventions, community functioning, and career/vocational transitions appropriate for students at the Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence age level. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Minor Core courses; completion of all general education licensure requirements for student teaching; to be taken concurrently with SPE 483/583, SPE 461/561, and SPE 430/530. This course is designed for persons seeking initial licensure in Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence education and cross-categorical special education at the Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence level.”

SPE 447/547, Methods in Cross-Categorical Special Education-Early Adolescence/Adolescence, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course focuses on curriculum, methods and strategies used in educating students with disabilities (Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, Specific Learning Disabilities, and Cognitive Disabilities) at the Early Adolescence/Adolescence age level in a variety of educational placements. Topics covered within this course include academic instruction, positive behavior interventions, community functioning, and career/vocational transitions appropriate for students at the Early Adolescence/Adolescence age level. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Minor core courses; completion of all general education licensure requirements for student teaching; to be taken concurrently with SPE 484/584, SPE 461/561, and SPE 430/530. This course is designed for persons seeking initial licensure in Early Adolescence/Adolescence education and cross-categorical special education at the Early Adolescence/Adolescence level. Offered summer session.”

SPE 452/552, Individual Educational Assessment, 3 credits, description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This course addresses educational assessment as it relates to the needs of students with Specific Learning Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, and Cognitive Disabilities in the context of educational needs. Specific approaches for the evaluation of special education eligibility, teaching and instruction, and monitoring student progress are discussed, including norm-referenced tests, curriculum-based assessment, ecological assessment, and observational technique. Prerequisites: junior standing and admission to Teacher Education program; SPE 401/501; SPE 416/516.”

SPE 461/561, Clinical in Special Education, 1 credit, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course is a field experience for students seeking special education licensure. Students are placed in a public school special education or inclusionary general education classroom setting in which they will experience daily activities with children identified with disabilities (Specific Learning Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, and Cognitive Disabilities) and special education teacher responsibilities. This experience will consist of a partial-day classroom experience in a school setting under the direct supervision of a teacher certified to teach students with mild disabilities at the Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence or Early Adolescence/Adolescence age level. This experience provides a setting in which students are to develop observation and small group teaching experiences. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Minor core courses; completion of all general education licensure requirements for student teaching; to be taken concurrently with SPE 446/546 or SPE 447/547, SPE 483/583 or SPE 484/584, and SPE 430/530. This course is designed for persons seeking initial teaching licensure in general classroom instruction and cross-categorical special education. Five-week course. Pass/Fail grading.”

SPE 483/583, Student Teaching: Cross-Categorical Special Education: Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence, 9 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This student teaching experience is a partial-semester, full-day experience in a public school special education or inclusionary general education classroom setting. Students are placed in a state approve special education program, serving students identified with disabilities (Specific Learning Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, and/or Cognitive Disabilities) at the Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence age level. This experience provides a setting in which students are to demonstrate teaching and assessment abilities related to students with special needs. Students work under the immediate supervision of a certified teacher and a university supervisor. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Minor core courses; completion of all general education licensure requirements for student teaching; to be taken concurrently with SPE 446/546, SPE 461/561, and SPE 430/530. This course is designed for persons seeking initial licensure in Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence education and cross-categorical special education at the Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence level. Nine-week course. Pass/Fail grading.”

SPE 484/584, Student Teaching: Cross-Categorical Special Education: Early Adolescence/Adolescence, 9 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This student teaching experience is a partial-semester, full-day experience in a public school special education or inclusionary general education classroom setting. Students are placed in a state approved special education program, serving students identified with disabilities (Specific Learning Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, and/or Cognitive Disabilities) at the Early Adolescence/Adolescence age level. This experience provides a setting in which students are to demonstrate teaching and assessment abilities related to students with special needs. Students work under the immediate supervision of a certified teacher and a University supervisor. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Minor core courses; completion of all general education licensure requirements for student teaching; to be taken concurrently with SPE 446/547, SPE 461/561, and SPE 430/530. This course is designed for persons seeking initial licensure in Early Adolescence/Adolescence education and cross-categorical special education at the Early Adolescence/Adolescence level. Nine-week course. Pass/Fail grading.”

SPE 783, Practicum: Cross-categorical Special Education: Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence, 3 credits, title, description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This practicum experience is a full-day experience in a public school special education or inclusionary general education classroom setting. Students are placed in a state approved special education program, serving students identified with disabilities (Specific Learning Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, and/or Cognitive Disabilities) at the Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence age level. This experience provides a setting in which students are to demonstrate teaching and assessment abilities related to students with special needs. Students work under the supervision of a certified teacher and a university supervisor. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Core Courses and Certification Option Courses; to be taken concurrently with SPE 786. Pass/Fail grading.”

SPE 784, Practicum: Cross-categorical Special Education: Early Adolescence/Adolescence, 3 credits, title, description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This practicum experience is a full-day experience in a public school special education or inclusionary general education classroom setting. Students are placed in a state approved special education program, serving students identified with disabilities (Specific Learning Disabilities, Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, and/Cognitive Disabilities) at the Early Adolescence/Adolescence age level. This experience provides a setting in which students are to demonstrate teaching and assessment abilities related to students with special needs. Students work under the immediate supervision of a certified teacher and a university supervisor. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Core Courses and Certification Option Courses; to be taken concurrently with SPE 786. Pass/Fail grading.”

SPE 786, Graduate Seminar in Special Education, 2 credits, title description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This course provides students, currently enrolled in a practica, to have directed discussions regarding issues that are occurring in the special education or inclusionary general classroom settings. Students will meet to discuss their experiences with other students having similar learning experiences. Prerequisites: completion of all Special Education Core Courses and Certification; to be taken concurrently with SPE 783 or SPE 784. Pass/Fail grading.”

Federal and DPI standards now require the integration of special education students into the regular classroom. The proposal deals with courses that are directly related to teacher certification, and is designed to prepare students to teach all students cross-categorically. UCC did not question the proposal, but was concerned with the effective date of fall 2000, and asked the department to evaluate the effect retroactivity would have on current students.

This was a first reading. There will be a second reading.

7. First Reading, Proposal #7, Microbiology —Concentration in Clinical Microbiology, credits, courses; MIC 500 Orientation to Clinical Microbiology, new course; MIC 752 deletion; MIC 753, 770, 780, 790, 438/538, changes, effective fall 2002

M.S. Biology: Concentration in Clinical Microbiology, credits, required courses, electives, deletion of MIC 752 and addition of MLS 530, MIC 500, clarifying application procedure, effective fall 2002.
 
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY CONCENTRATION
This concentration is offered by the Department of Biology and Department of Microbiology, Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center, Marshfield Laboratories/St. Joseph's Hospital/Marshfield Clinic, and the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene.  This program involves on-campus didactic training, 9 full-time weeks of clinical rotations at Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center, 6 full-time weeks in clinical laboratories at Marshfield Laboratories/St. Joseph's Hospital/ Marshfield Clinic, and 2 full-time weeks at the Wisconsin Laboratory of Hygiene.  Students who complete the Concentration in Clinical Microbiology are eligible to secure Specialist Microbiologist (SM-AAM) certification of the American Academy of Microbiology.  The combination of classroom education, clinical rotations and research experience will prepare students for a variety of employment opportunities including:  (1) supervisory positions in medical centers and public health and private reference laboratories, (2) research, marketing, and sales in select industries, and (3) basic research.  This concentration requires (1) completion of a research thesis
(Plan A--Thesis) or seminar paper (Plan B--Non-Thesis) in an area of clinical microbiology, (2) passing an oral comprehensive exam, and (3) completion of the core curriculum of a minimum of 31 credits (Plan A) or 33 credits (Plan B).

Admission Requirements

1. Individuals accepted into the Clinical Microbiology program must hold a Bachelor of Science Degree or equivalent in Microbiology, Biology, or a related field with competency in Microbiology.  Graduates with a Medical Technology Degree from a program accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences are also eligible.

Minimum prerequisites for admission to the program are MIC 230 (Fundamentals of Microbiology),
MIC 406/506 (Immunology), MIC 407/507 (Pathogenic Bacteriology) or comparable courses.  A strong chemistry background including Biochemistry is strongly recommended.  Students lacking prerequisites may be conditionally admitted to the concentration contingent on remediation of prerequisites. Remediated prerequisite courses do not count toward the MS degree.

2. Cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of not less than 2.85.

3. Completion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).  A score of 1500 for the total general test scores for verbal, qualitative, and analytical measures is strongly recommended.

4. Students must complete an "Application for Admission to Graduate Study" form.  Students requesting financial aid must also complete the "Application for Graduate Assistantship" form.

5. Three current letters of recommendation (forms provided with admission application).

6. An application letter which details:
 -- academic and professional goals
 -- previous relevant experiences
 -- reasons for selecting program

7. Completed application forms, letters of recommendation, and applicant letter must be returned to the Admissions Office by February 1.  A review committee will assess all submitted materials and a letter of decision will be sent to the applicant.  An interview may be required in some instances.  Acceptance or non-acceptance is based upon a comprehensive review of all elements of the completed application.

Core Curriculum
 Plan A --Thesis    Credits
 MIC 500 Orientation to Clinical Microbiology  1
 MIC 554 Mechanisms of Pathogenesis    2
 MIC 751 Graduate Seminar 2
 MIC 753 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases 2
 MIC 755 Advanced Immunology 2
 MIC 770 Clinical Microbiology-Practicum I 5
 MIC 780 Clinical Microbiology-Practicum II 4
 MIC 790 Clinical Microbiology-Practicum III 2
 MIC 799 Research:  Masters Thesis 6
 Minimum elective credits                                                   5
 
 Total Credits 31

Core Curriculum
 Plan B –Non-Thesis   Credits
 MIC  500 Orientation to Clinical Microbiology 1
 MLS 530  Medical Laboratory Management 2
  and Education
 MIC 554 Mechanisms of Pathogenesis  2
 MIC 751 Graduate Seminar 2
 MIC 753 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases 2
 MIC 755 Advanced Immunology 2
 MIC 761 Research Paper 2
 MIC 770 Clinical Microbiology-Practicum I 5
 MIC 780 Clinical Microbiology-Practicum II 4
 MIC 790 Clinical Microbiology-Practicum III 2
 Minimum elective credits  9
 
 Total Credits 33

Electives
Elective courses to complement the career goals of the student or to make up academic deficiencies will be agreed upon by the student and the student's advisory committee. Students may be required to take additional elective courses based on recommendations of their committee.

  MIC 516 Microbial Genetics  4 cr.
  MIC 520 Virology  3 cr.
  MIC 521 Virology Lab  2 cr.
  MIC 525 Bacterial Physiology  4 cr.
  MIC 526  Food Microbiology  4 cr.
  MIC 538 Bioinformatics  2 cr.
  BIO 506 Parasitology  4 cr.
  BIO 512 Mycology  3 cr.
  BIO 513 Medical Mycology  3 cr.
  BIO 535 Molecular Biology  3 cr.
  BIO 536 Molecular Biology   1 cr.
   Laboratory
  BIO 701 Communication in the  4 cr.
   Biological Sciences
  CHM 517 Biochemistry I  3 cr.
  CHM 518 Biochemistry II  3 cr.
  MLS 525 Molecular Pathology  3 cr.
  MLS 530 Medical Laboratory  2 cr.
   Management and Education
  HED 755 Epidemiology and Public  3 cr.
   Health Issues
 
 MIC 500, Orientation to Clinical Microbiology, 1 credit, new course, effective fall 2002.
 “This course will explore opportunities within clinical microbiology to help the student pursue a specific discipline. A clinical microbiologist can work in a variety of settings including public health, diagnostic testing, pharmaceutical sales, and basic research and development. Discussion will focus on academic and professional requirements for each career track. Information retrieval and oral and written communication skills relevant to clinical microbiology will also be covered. Offered by resident faculty and visiting lecturers. Offered Sem. I. Pass/Fail grading.”

MIC 438/538, Bioinformatics, 2 credits, title, formerly 460), effective fall 2002.
“The course uses computers to study and compare the sequence of nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or the amino acids in a protein. Computers are also used to examine the three dimensional structure of proteins. Being able to manipulate and study this information is the basis for the current revolution in Biotechnology. Topics include evolution, taxonomy, genomics and understanding disease. This course provides students an opportunity to explore the relationships between biology, microbiology, chemistry and computer science. Prerequisites: BIO 306 or MIC 230 (BIO 435 or MIC 416 recommended). Lect. 1, Lab. 2. Offered Sem. II. Cross-listed with BIO 438/538. May only earn credit in MIC or BIO.”

MIC 752, course deletion, effective fall 2002.

MIC 753, Epidemiology of Infectious Disease, 2 credits, title, description, prerequisites, effective fall 2002.
“This course examines the causes, distribution, control, and prevention of infectious disease in human populations. Basic epidemiological concepts, including study design, analysis and modeling of infectious disease data, establishing causal relationships, detecting confounding factors, and assessing risk will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on issues of special interest to the clinical epidemiologist including laboratory diagnosis used in outbreak investigations by microbiological, serological and molecular techniques.  In addition, methods to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of diagnostic tests will be examined. Prerequisites: MIC 407/507 or equivalent course. MTH 205 or MTH 250 or HED 755. Offered Sem. II.” (Discussed w/HED—ok)

MIC 770, Clinical Microbiology Practicum I, 5 credits, description, effective fall 2002.
“Students spend 9 full-time weeks (30 hrs/wk) in the clinical laboratories at Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center where they receive training and hands-on experience in clinical microbiology, immunology, parasitology, mycology, and virology.  In addition, students will actively participate with physicians, residents, and medical students in weekly infectious disease rounds and journal club. Prerequisites: acceptance into M.S. Biology: Clinical Microbiology Program.”

MIC 780, Clinical Microbiology Practicum II, 4 credits, description, effective fall 2002.
“Students spend 6 full-time weeks (30 hrs/wk) in the clinical laboratories at Marshfield Laboratories/St. Joseph’s Hospital/Marshfield Clinic. Training will include hands-on experience with state-of-the art molecular biology techniques.  Specific exercises involving molecular epidemiology and infection control will be emphasized.  Students will also participate in infectious disease rounds and journal club. Prerequisites: acceptance into M.S. Biology: Clinical Microbiology Program.”

MIC 790, Clinical Microbiology Practicum III, 2 credits, description, effective fall 2002.
“Students will spend 2 full-time weeks (30 hrs/wk) at the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene for public health training in mycobacteriology, sexually-transmitted diseases, food-and water-borne diseases, and community respiratory illness surveillance.  Emphasis will be on prevention and control programs and outbreak responses currently in place at the Wisconsin Department of Health. Prerequisites: MIC 770 and MIC 780.”

This proposal increases the core requirements for the Thesis plan by 1 credit (addition of MIC 500-1 cr.) and the Non-Thesis plan by 3 credits (addition of MIC 500 and increase of electives from 7 to 9 credits). In addition, electives will now be listed. MLS 525, MLS 530, and HED 755 were added to the list of electives. The main focus of discussion was why MIC 500 is pass/fail. The department responded that the course is offered early in the program to help students decide on a specific career track. A Fail would automatically eliminate a student from the program. Department will be clear with students what is required to pass the course. Some suggestions were made for the course descriptions and objectives for MIC 500 and 538. The MIC 500 description above reflects changes; 538 does not.  The department clarified that the plan is for MIC 538 to be cross-listed with BIO 538; however, the biology department has not acted on it yet. The description is written as a cross-listed course.

M/S/P to waive the second reading and approve the proposal.

8. First Reading, Proposal #8, Master of Business Administration (MBA) — 30 credits, complete revision of program content, effective fall 2002.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
“The College of Business Administration is an institution of higher education dedicated to the personal and professional development of its students. The college’s programs provide our students with an integrated business education at the undergraduate and masters' levels that prepares them for successful professional careers. Our graduates will be prepared to be effective problem solvers, ethical decision-makers, and life-long learners in a dynamic, diverse world environment.

The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers a program of evening and online courses in business leading to the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. The program, which is accredited by AACSB — The International Association of Management Education, is designed for qualified students, regardless of area of undergraduate preparation.

The overall objective of the program is to prepare graduates for positions of leadership in business and public administration. The program has been designed to develop the student’s critical, analytical, problem solving and decision-making capabilities and to provide basic knowledge useful in the solution of management problems.
More information can be obtained at the web site: http://perth.uwlax.edu/ba.
 
ADMISSION
Applicants for admission to the program must apply through the university Admissions Office. In order to be admitted in good standing, applicants must meet the university requirements including a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.85 (or 3.00 for the last half of undergraduate work) on a 4.00 scale and demonstrate the ability to successfully complete the MBA program. Performance on the GMAT and prior academic work will be used as indicators of ability. International students are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit their scores for evaluation. Applicants who meet the minimum standards may be denied admission because of enrollment limitations.
 
THE PROGRAM
Foundation
The MBA program has two phases for qualified applicants with foundation course deficiencies. Such applicants will be admitted to the program while they complete their remaining foundation course work.
 
Foundation Courses
ECO 110 and ECO 120 or ECO 703 and ECO 704
ACC 221 and ACC 222 or ACC 703 and ACC 704
MKT 309 or MKT 700
FIN 355 or FIN 701
MGT 393 or MGT 702
MGT 308 or MGT 703
MGT 205
I-S 220
MTH 205
 (A minimum grade of “C” is required in all foundation courses completed pre- or  post-baccalaureate.)

Students completing foundation courses must achieve a minimum grade point average of 3.00. Students who earn less than a “C” grade in any foundation course will be dropped from the program.

Some courses are offered via the Internet in an accelerated format that may allow completion of the foundation program in one calendar year.

Credit by exam (test out) is available for several foundation courses. Information should be obtained from the program director.

MBA
Qualified applicants who have completed at least 80% of the foundation courses are admitted to the graduate degree requirement phase. (Remaining foundation courses must be completed within the first two semesters of graduate study.) Course requirements for the degree are listed below:

Masters Degree Requirements:
     Credits
BUSBUS 730731 Decision Framing and Decision Making in Complex EnvironmentsDecision Making in Complex Environments 33
BUS 735 Business Decision-Making Methodology and Research 4
BUS 750 Managing in an Environmentally and Socially Conscious World 3
BUS 755 Managing in a Changing Technological Environment 3
BUS 760 Managing in a Global Environment 4
BUS 790 Assessment 1
    Electives* 9
    Minimum Credits 30
 
* Elective credits must be selected from course work approved by the MBA Program Director. Several options are available for students to complete the elective credit requirement.  These options include:
· MBA elective coursework from UW-La Crosse or other institutions with the approval of the MBA program director.
· Directed Internship Experience (maximum 6 credits)
· Directed Independent Study  (maximum 3 credits)
· Research: Masters Thesis (maximum 6 credits)
All students must complete at least six elective credits at the 700 level.

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
A 3.00 grade point average in courses counting toward the MBA is required for graduation. Students must be able to achieve this grade point average in, at most, 36 credits or they will be dropped from the program. A student earning a “D” or “F” in a graduate level course, whether it has been taken on this campus or at another university, will be dropped from the program. A maximum of six credits of “C” may be applied to the MBA.
 
RESTRICTIONS
Enrollment in MBA courses is restricted to graduate students in the MBA program, unless given special permission by the program director. Graduate students from other programs could be permitted to take, at most, six credits of 500/600/700 level MBA courses.”

BUS 730, Decision Framing and Decision Making in Complex Environments, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course challenges students to integrate all of the discipline-specific skills developed in the MBA foundation courses within a dynamic decision-making context.  The focus of the course will be on the process of problem framing/identification, analysis, and decision making in complex and uncertain environments. Students develop critical judgments about the efficient and effective application of core knowledge which requires applying the tools of analysis appropriately and exacting useful insights and drawing managerially relevant recommendations from the analysis. Prerequisite: successful completion of the MBA Foundation requirements.”

BUS 731, Decision Making in Complex Environments, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course further integrates the discipline-specific skills developed in the MBA foundation courses and Decision Framing  (BUS730).  The course will focus on the process of problem analysis and decision making in complex and uncertain environments utilizing an interdisciplinary approach by integrating critical knowledge and practices from finance, marketing, operations and organizational behavior.  The course emphasizes the development of critical judgments, implementation of analytical tools, extracting useful insights and drawing managerially relevant recommendations from the analysis. Prerequisite: successful completion of the MBA Foundation requirements and BUS 730. Offered Sem. II.”

BUS 735, Business Decision Making and Research Methodology, 4 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course introduces a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods that support business decision-making and research. These methods range from quantitative approaches like multivariate analysis, simulation and linear programming to qualitative approaches that use unstructured forms of data collection, both by interviewing and observation.  Students will achieve conceptual understanding of the research methods covered in the course and acquire hands-on experience in applying these methods to practical business situations and business research while using computer-based tools.  Prerequisite: successful completion of the Foundation requirements. Offered Sem. I.”

BUS 750, Managing in an Environmental and Socially Conscious World, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course analyzes business decisions in the context of environmental, human rights, and social responsibility issues. The course provides an open, balanced, and interdisciplinary approach that examines the complex social, environmental, and human rights issues central to the conscientious management of business organizations. The course will examine these issues in business decision situations, explore solutions from alternative paradigms of corporate governance and incorporate them when formulating organizational tactics and strategy.  Prerequisite: BUS 730. Offered Sem. II.”

BUS 755, Managing in a Changing Technological Environment, 3 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course examines changes in the technological environment in the modern business world.  It surveys contemporary information technologies such as the Internet and their impacts on business practices in all essential business function areas. The course introduces effective models and techniques for managing technological change. Prerequisite: BUS 730. Offered Sem. II.”

BUS 760, Managing in a Global Environment, 4 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course develops the critical skills and integrated knowledge necessary to function effectively in today’s global environment. The course describes how global agreements, changing technologies, global institutions and evolving political patterns affect the conduct of global business. It also develops the ability to frame problems from multiple managerial perspectives — including operational, economic, environmental, ethical, financial, cultural, and technological frames of reference — and to apply sophisticated decision making and coalition building processes to arrive at integrated solutions in a diverse and changing world. This course will typically employ a problem-based approach to the subject area and will seek to integrate, in this approach, such traditional functional disciplines as operations, logistics, marketing, finance, accounting, information systems, and management. Prerequisite: BUS 730. Offered Sem. II.”

BUS 780, Internship in Business Administration, 1-6 credits.
“This course is a practical learning experience designed to apply the skills and competencies acquired within the MBA program to challenging business problems in both the profit and non-profit sectors. Prerequisites: successful completion of the MBA core curriculum, and written approval of the MBA program director. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6.”

BUS 790, MBA Program Assessment, 1 credit, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course consists of a capstone activity which gives students an opportunity to reflect on their  MBA experience as a whole—and thus, to have one, final, critical learning experience. Participation in the concluding assessment exercise provides useful feedback regarding the effectiveness of the MBA program.  This assessment will be multi-disciplinary and multi-dimensional  in its design and execution. Where possible, it will involve participants  from  the broader UW-L academic and business communities. Last course before graduation. Pass/Fail grading.”

BUS 799, Research: Master’s Thesis, 1-6 credits, new course, effective fall 2002.
“This course consists of a directed independent research study to be selected and executed under the direction of a graduate faculty member.  Repeatable for credit - maximum 6.  Completion of a Master's thesis is optional within the MBA program. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6. Completion of a Master’s thesis is optional within the MBA program. Prerequisite: successful completion of the MBA core curriculum.”

The proposed changes have been developed over a two-year period and received overwhelming approval at the college level. The revised MBA program meets business needs. The foundation courses and admissions requirements are the same, but the core will consist of newly developed team-taught BUS courses as well as a field experience or Master’s Thesis. The electives have been expanded. Students may focus their electives in a particular area to develop expertise. The assessment course (BUS 790) concludes the program and offers students closure and gives the faculty a means of evaluating and improving the MBA program. The college assured the committee that no student would be required to take additional classes as a result of this revision being retroactive. Each student would receive individual advising.

M/S/ to waive the second reading and approve the proposal subject to course description/objectives wording changes. There was an objection. This is a first reading; there will be a second reading.

  9.   Old business – none

10. New business – none

The meeting adjourned at 6:10 p.m. the next meeting is scheduled for February 5, 2002. However, a special meeting may be called prior to that time.
 

Diane L. Schumacher
GCC Secretary