Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Minutes
November 12, 2002

Members Present:  Ronald Glass, Donald Socha, Mitchell Stone, Stephen Mc Dougal, Carol Angell, Travis McBride, Sharon Casey, Robert Klindworth, Adrienne Loh, Andrew Matchett, Dean Wilder, Brian Finnigan, Mary Heim

Members Absent:  Nick Osborne (exc), Jamie Lee Bergum (exc)

Consultants:  Emily Johnson, R. Daniel Duquette, John Jax, Diane Schumacher

Guests:  Kathryn Hollon, Jan VonRuden, Michael Winfrey, Kimberly Vogt, David Riley, James Batesky, Laura Nelson,
Brian Tomlinson, Timothy Mc Andrews, Joseph Tiffany, Kenny Hunt, James Theler, Sheldon Smith, Carol Miller, Enilda Delgado

1. Stephen Mc Dougal was introduced as a new member of the committee.

 2. M/S/P to approve minutes of October 22, 2002.

 2. Second Readings – None.

 3. First Readings:

 Proposal #8, Microbiology Major, description, effective Fall 2003.

Microbiology Major (Science and Allied Health, Business, Liberal Studies)-40 Microbiology/Biology credits:

A.      Biology Core (8 credits): BIO 105 and a second biology course (BIO 204, 210, 303, 306, 312, or 315)

B.       Microbiology Core (22 credits): MIC 230, 350, 406, 416, 425, 461

C.       Microbiology/Biology electives (10 credits; at least six credits from List I, a maximum of two credits from List III.  One course from list II strongly recommended):

List I:  MIC 407, 420, 421, 426, 428, 434, 440, 454, 460

List II:  MIC 442, BIO 406, 412, 413, 449, 463

List III:  MIC 479, 489, 499 (only 1 credit of MIC 479 applies to list III)

D.      Additional Requirements:  One course in math (MTH 150 or above), one course in physics (PHY 125 or 103 and 104 or 203 and 204), and a minimum of 19 credits of chemistry are required including: CHM 103, 104, 300 (or 303, 304 and 305), 325 (or 417 and 418).

 Microbiology Major:

Biomedical Concentration   (Science and Allied Health, Business, Liberal Studies)-40 Microbiology/Biology credits:

A.      Biology Core (12 credits): BIO 105, 312, 313

B.       Microbiology Core (23 credits): MIC 230, 406, 407, 416, 425, 461

C.       Microbiology/Biology electives (five additional credits; at least three credits from List I, a maximum of two credits from List III):

List I:  MIC 350, 420, 421, 416, 425, 426, 440, 454

List II:  BIO 406, 412, 413, 435, 463

List III:  MIC 479, 489, 499 (only 1 credit of MIC 479 applies to list III)

D.      Additional Requirements:  One course in math (MTH 150 or above), one course in physics (PHY 125 or 103 and 104 or 203 and 204), and a minimum of 19 credits of chemistry are required including: CHM 103, 104, 300 (or 303, 304 and 305), 325 (or 417 and 418).

 Microbiology Major

Environmental Science Concentration  (Science and Allied Health, Business, Liberal Studies)-40 Microbiology/Biology credits:

A.      Biology Core (8 credits): BIO 105 and a second biology course (BIO 204, 210, or 303)

B.       Microbiology Core (21 credits): MIC 230, 350, 416, 425, 434, 461

C.       Microbiology/Biology electives (11 credits; at least five credits from List I*, at least three credits from list II, and a maximum of two credits from List III.):

List I:  MIC 406, 407, 420, 421, 427, 428, 440, BIO 307 or 341 or 464*, 447, 448, 449

List II:  MIC 442, BIO 406, 412, 463

List III:  MIC 479, 489, 499 (only 1 credit of MIC 479 applies to list III)

D.      Additional Requirements:  MTH 205 or 250 and 175 or 207; one course in physics (PHY 125 or 103 and 104 or 203 and 204) and a minimum of 24 credits of chemistry are required including: CHM 103, 104, 300 (or 303, 304 and 305), 301, 325 (or 417 and 418).

*Only one course (3 credits) from BIO 307, 341, 464 may be applied to elective requirements

In order for any Microbiology Major (including concentrations) to continue in upper division microbiology coursework they must:

1.                    Complete BIO 105, a second course in biological sciences (204, 210, 303, 306, 312, or 315) and MIC 230.

2.                    Complete three semesters of chemistry (CHM 103, 104, and 300 or 301 or 303).

3.                    Have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the six science courses listed above.

4.                    Complete one semester of math (MTH 150 or higher) with a grade of C or better.

Microbiology students may then apply for continuance in the Microbiology program (usually after the completion of three or four semesters).  Application materials may be obtained from the Microbiology advisor.  Admission is competitive and not all students meeting the minimum requirements are guaranteed admission.  Students not meeting the minimum requirements may petition for admission into the program and may be accepted depending on space availability.  The number allowed in the Microbiology Program is flexible and is dependent upon room in upper-division microbiology courses.

 

MIC 407/507, Pathogenic Bacteriology, course description, effective Fall 2003.  The study of pathogenic bacteria and their relationships to disease; principles of infection and pathogenesis, and unique properties of pathogens.  Laboratory emphasis is on techniques for isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria.  Not applicable to biology major; may be applied to the microbiology, clinical laboratory science major and/or degree as well as an elective for the Biology biomedical concentration.  Lect. 2, Lab. 4.  Prerequisites: MIC 230 and MIC 406 (may be taken concurrently).

MIC 425/525, Bacterial Physiology, prerequisites, effective Fall 2003.  Prerequisites: MIC 406; MTH 150 or higher, and CHM 300 (or 303).  Admitted to Microbiology major.

MIC 442/542, Plant Microbe Interactions, 3 credits, new course, effective Spring 2004.  This course will explore in depth various ways that plants interact with microbes in the environment, at the macroscopic, cellular, and molecular levels.  Case studies will include both parasitic and mutualistic (symbiotic) interactions.  Microbes include fungi, bacteria, nematodes, and viruses.  Includes plant pathology and studies of the beneficial relationships between plants and microbes.  Inquiry based labs are integrated into the lecture and discussion sessions.  Lect. 2, Lab. 2.  Prerequisites: BIO 204, MIC 230, plus EITHER BIO 306 or MIC 416.  Cross-listed with BIO 442/542.  Offered Sem. II, even years.

Microbiology is making modifications to courses and their core curriculum per the new curriculum recommendations by the American Society for Microbiology.  UCC recommended holding this proposal until Biology has turned in their half of the proposal for MIC/BIO 442/542. 

This was a first reading. There will be a second reading. 

 

Proposal #10, C-S 365, Systems Analysis, course deletion, effective Fall 2002.

C-S 454/554, Digital Image Processing, 3 credits, new course, effective Spring 2003.  This course introduces the fundamentals of digital image processing techniques with an emphasis on the design and implementation of image processing algorithms.  Topics include: color models, point-processing techniques, covolution, Fourier domain processing, the discrete cosine transform, image compression methodologies, image restoration and enhancement, sampling and image display.  Prerequisite: C-S 340.  This course cannot be taken for credit both at the undergraduate level and the graduate level.  Offered at least once every two years.

 M/S/P to approve the proposal on the first reading.

Proposal #9, ARC 250, Museum Studies, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  This introductory course provides a history of museums, their goals and methods, administration, curation and exhibit techniques.  Participants will be taking field trips to museums.  Prerequisites: ARC 200 recommended.  Offered Sem. II.

ARC 315, Prairie Plains Archaeology, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  This survey of the Prairie-Plains examines cultural ecological adaptations, sociopolitical changes and continuities among Prairie and Plains Indians through time.  Perspective from archeology, ethnology, history and contemporary literary sources are used to characterize human adaptation to the Prairie-Plains area and the impacts of Euro-American society on native peoples.  Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended.  Offered Sem. II.

ARC 320, Historical Archaeology, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  The focus of this course is historical archeology.  This discipline combines an archaeological evaluation of material remains from the historic past with an examination and analysis of historical sources.  In the New World, historical archaeologists work on a broad range of sites that document early European settlement and its effects on Native American peoples, wars fought on American soil, the subsequent spread of the Euro-American frontier, and later periods of urbanization and industrialization.  Historical archaeologists seek to understand the past from an anthropological perspective and appreciate how broad historical developments have shaped modern society.  In this class we will explore all these aspects of historical archaeology in the New World and abroad.  Prerequisites: ARC 200 recommended. 

ARC 360, Archaeology of the Andes, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  This course will review the prehistory of South America from its earliest peopling to the Spanish Conquest.  Emphasis will be placed on tracing the rise of civilization in the Andes which culminated in the Inca Empire.  Topics to be explored include: the controversial evidence for early man in South America, the role of the ocean and mountains in shaping prehispanic life, the origin of domesticated plants and animals, and the rise of the complex societies of the Moche, Tiwanaku, Wari, Chimu, and of course, the Inca.  Cultures of northern South America and the tropical forest will also be discussed.  Prerequisites: ARC 200 recommended.  Offered upon student request.

ARC 395, Graduate Preparation Seminar, 1 credit, new course, effective Fall 2003.  Third year students who are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in Anthropology or Archaeology have many things to consider.  This seminar is designed to help students determine what research they intend to pursue after graduation, what graduate schools are particularly well-suited to meet their research needs, how to target and apply to certain programs, and how to develop an impressive resume. This seminar will also serve to prepare students who do not intend to continue their education in graduate school for employment opportunities upon graduation.  Pass/Fail grading.

ARC/ANT 454, Historical and Theoretical Approaches in Anthropology, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  This course is an examination of historical and theoretical approaches in Anthropology.  The goal of the course is to prepare majors for graduate study by examining the history of the discipline and exploring the methods and theories developed by anthropologists to study and explain human behavior.  Prerequisite: ARC 200, junior or senior standing.

ARC/ANT 479, Archaeology/Anthropology Laboratory Assistant, 1-2 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  An opportunity to assist in the preparation and instruction of an archaeology/anthropology laboratory.  Students will be expected to assist in preparation of course materials, demonstrate proper techniques, and evaluate student performance.  Admission by instructor consent.  Repeatable for credit – maximum 4.  Not applicable to the Archaeology major or Anthropology minor.  Pass/Fail grading

ANT 203, Culture and Ecology, course description, course required for Anthropology minor, effective Fall 2003.  This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology using the paradigm of cultural ecological theory.  Cultural ecology theory is used to study the interaction between humans and their environments including hunting gathering bands, agricultural tribes, irrigation dependent chiefdoms, and archaic and modern states.  The course examines the impact of globalization on the social systems mentioned above.  Much of the course is used to examine contemporary global issues.  Offered Sem. II.  (Department withdrew change of requiring Anthropology minor.)

ANT/SOC 300, Problems of Developing Nations: Focus on Latin America, title, course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2003.  The course uses a global studies approach to examine problems in human adaptation at distinct periods of time and place in Latin America.  “Global studies” combines cultural ecology with political economy to investigate the impact of political movements, such as the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the Nicaraguan Revolution of 1979, and current neo-liberal political movements on the quality of life in Latin America.  Prerequisite: ANT/SOC 202, or POL 202, or GEO 202, or HIS 202.  Offered Sem. II.

   ANT/SOC 355, Terrorism and Globalization, title, course description, prerequisites, cross-listed, effective Fall 2003.
   The goal of the course is to understand contemporary anti-globalization, anti-American social movements in Africa, the
   Middle East, and Asia.  The argument is made that current cultural conflicts are based on misunderstandings between the
   cultures of the West (Europe and the United States) and the cultures of the East (Africa, Middle East and Asia).  Western
   cultures seek openness in terms of trade and political democracy, while many Eastern cultures fear openness both because
   of the impact it will have on traditional societies and the threat of democracy to authoritarian states.  Prerequisites: ANT
   202 or SOC 202 or POL 202 or GEO 202 or HIS 202.  Offered Sem. II.

SOC 320, Demography, title, course description, effective Fall 2003.  This course is designed as a basic survey of the field of demography.  Sources of population data will be explored along with causes and consequences of population growth, composition and distribution.  This course will focus on the concepts, measurements, trends and theories of the major demographic processes of fertility, mortality and migration.  Prerequisites: SOC 110 or 120 or 300, or ANT 101.  Offered occasionally.

SOC 499, Seminar in Sociology, course description, effective Fall 2003.  Intensive study of some specific area or problem of sociology.  Prerequisites: SOC 350, 390, or 395.  Repeatable for credit – maximum of 6.

ANT 331, Personality and Culture, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

ARC/ANT 410, Anthropology of Art, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

SOC 308, Social History, course deletion, effective Spring 2003.  (HIS 308 remains.)

SOC 480, Comparative Sociology, title, delete cross-listing of ANT 480, effective Spring 2003.

Proposal #11, SOC 314, Industry and Society, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.  (Withdrew proposal.)

SOC 338, Sociological Aspects of Work and Life, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  This course will explore the sociological impact of work and life demands in contemporary American society.  Special emphasis will be given to how gender, sexual orientation, social class, race and ethnicity, and family structure affect individuals’ ability to balance the demands of work and life.  Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101.  May only earn credit in SOC 338 or PSY 444.  Offered occasionally.  According to the Department Chair, PSY 444 and SOC 338 are interchangeable.

The Archaeology program is growing and faculty have changed.  This has allowed the program to be refocused on the Americas.  Therefore, new courses have been created, some old courses deleted, and some remaining courses changed.  UCC recommended the following: 1) UCC Chair will contact the Chair of History regarding several courses and the Chair of Psychology regarding SOC 338; 2) refine the title and abbreviation for ANT/SOC 300; 3) refining course description and title for ANT/SOC 355.  The committee questioned whether or not this was a new course.; 4) the possibility of SOC 320 being cross-listed with ERS; and 5) questioned whether ARC/ANT 479 should be for credit. 

This was a first reading. There will be a second reading. 

Proposal #12, C-I 323, Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education.

C-I 325, Methods of Teaching Middle/Secondary Physical Education, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education.

ESS 326, Clinical Experiences in Teaching Physical Education II, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education.

ESS 435/535, Sports for Persons with Disabilities, number was ESS 335/535, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.

Prerequisites: ESS 231.

ESS 424, Curriculum Development and Administration of Elementary/Secondary Physical Education Programs, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, ESS 321, 326, C-I 323, 325 or concurrent enrollment, and a 2.75 cumulative GPA.

ESS 367, Individual Sports, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.

Prerequisites: ESS 112, ESS 225/226.

ESS 258, Team Sports, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.

Prerequisites: ESS 112; ESS 225/226 or concurrent enrollment.

ESS 439, Methods and Internship in Special Physical Education, course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.  Methods and opportunities for students to plan, implement, and evaluate motor tasks and activities for children/adults who are disabled.  Students in the special physical education concentration are given priority in enrollment.  Lect. 2, Lab 4.  Prerequisites: ESS 233, 430, 435, 436.  Saturday morning laboratory required. 

 ESS 401, Dance, course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.  Theory and methods of teaching age appropriate dance activities for students in elementary/secondary grades.  Emphasis will be on skill progressions, teaching techniques and assessment methods.  Lect. 1, Lab 2.  Prerequisites: ESS 112, Admission to Teacher Education.

 ESS 422, Methods of Teaching an Active Healthy Lifestyle, course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.  This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to teach elementary/secondary students the cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills associated with a lifelong active healthy lifestyle based upon the five health related components of physical fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition.  Prerequisites: ESS 302, Admission to Teacher Education.

ESS 402, Advanced Activities, course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.  A program of opportunities to enhance advanced teaching knowledge and participation in a self-selected physical activity.  The course will go beyond the knowledge, skills and strategies that may be offered at the introductory level.  These opportunities may include, but not be limited to, participation in advanced activity classes offered both on and off campus, participation in advanced certification programs, intern teaching experiences in the student’s area of expertise.  Lab 2.  Prerequisites: ESS 321, 326, C-I 323, 325.  Repeatable for credit (with different activities) – maximum 3.  Pass/Fail grading.

 ESS 310, Teaching Outdoor Activities in Physical Education, number was ESS 120, prerequisites, effective Fall 2004.

Prerequisites: ESS 225/226, ESS 121.

 ESS 121, Adventure Theory for Physical Educators, number was ESS 312, course description, prerequisites,
 effective Fall 2004.  This course presents the concepts of adventure education including cooperative and initiative games.  The students will learn to use and implement a ropes course as a classroom for different age groups and diverse populations, especially as applied to physical education programs.  Much of the emphasis of the adventure theory will be introducing the teaching and methodology of adventure education.  This course introduces undergraduate students to teaching adventure education in elementary and secondary physical education programs in the schools. 

 Exercise and Sport Science Major – Physical Education Teacher Certification, change GPA for admission to Teacher Education from 2.50 to 2.75, effective Fall 2004.

(Teacher Certification programs) – 53 credits of professional requirements.  Required courses: (freshman year): ESS 112. 113**, 115, 121; (sophomore year): ESS 205, 206, 207, 225, 226, 258, 261; (junior year): ESS 201, 302, 303, 310, 321, 326, 367; (senior year): ESS 401, 402, 412, 422, 424; 16 credits of teacher education requirements: C-I 323, 325, and C-I 403 student teaching practicum; 15-18 credits of statutory requirements: ERS 100* of HIS 306* or SOC 225* or W-S 230*; C-S 101* or EDM 275 or approved HED/ESS computer workshop; PSY 370; EFN 205; ESS 231; and RDG 330.  Total Credits: 84-87 credits.

 Note:  Physical education teacher certification majors and minors are required to take BIO 103* or 105*, HPR 105*, and PSY 212 to meet prerequisite requirements for advanced courses. Students should refer to Teacher Education Council and State of Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) policies identified in the School of Education section on p. 78.  These policies apply to students in all teacher certification programs.

 Students must have successfully completed all parts of the PPST, earned and maintained a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 and be admitted to teacher education in order to enroll in teacher education courses. In order to enroll in student teaching practicum courses students must have earned and maintained a 2.75 cumulative GPA and a 2.75 GPA in the major, minor, concentration and professional course work (EFN 205, C-I 323, 325, RDG 330 or 328 and 432, and PSY 370).

 *Also fulfills General Education requirements.

Prerequisite changes necessary for general housekeeping.  Required cumulative GPA in order to be admitted to teacher education will now be 2.75.  This requirement change will be in line with School of Education entrance requirements and other programs in ESS.  The change will also give students a more realistic understanding of whether they will be able to have the necessary GPA to meet program requirements in a more timely manner.  M/S/P to approve the proposal on the first reading.

Due to lack of time, the first reading of CST Proposal #13 will take place at the next meeting, November 26, 2002.

4. Old Business

Chair distributed draft criteria for evaluation of proposals.  It will be discussed at future meeting.  The topic of method notification for meeting information will be on the next agenda.  This will include the hierarchy and the best way to notify depts, i.e. email, Web, Campus Connection.           

5. New Business

 DEAN APPROVED STUDENT PETITIONS

              CBA:         ENG 000L, taken in Germany, for ENG 200 to fulfill Gen Ed requirement.

        CBA:         ENG 208 for ENG 200 to fulfill Gen Ed requirement.

 The meting adjourned at 5:32 p.m.  The next UCC meeting is November 26, 2002 

 

Diane L. Schumacher, UCC Secretary