Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Minutes
December 10, 2002

Members Present:  Ronald Glass, Donald Socha, Mitchell Stone, Stephen Mc Dougal, Carol Angell, Travis McBride, Adrienne Loh, Andrew Matchett, Dean Wilder, Brian Finnigan, Nick Osborne

Members Absent:  Robert Klindworth, Sharon Casey (exc), Mary Heim (exc), Jamie Lee Bergum (exc)

Consultants:  Emily Johnson, Amelia Dittman, Carla Burkhardt, John Jax, Diane Schumacher

Guests:  Kathryn Hollon, Jan VonRuden, Charles Lee, Matthew Taylor, Lloyd Bogart, Betsy Morgan, Steven Senger, Leslee Poulton, Laura Nelson, Kuang-Wei Wen, Michael Winfrey, Bruce Riley, Georges Cravins, Sharon Scherwitz

1. M/S/P to approve minutes of November 26, 2002.

 2. Second Readings:

    PSY 231, Experimental Psychology and Research Methods, prerequisites, effective Spring 2003.

    Prerequisites: PSY 100; Open to psychology majors and minors only.

   MTH 205 was previously strongly recommended for this course. Psychology would like to remove this recommendation from the course prerequisites.  Betsy Morgan, psychology chair, asked to go on record as protesting the fact that UCC was asking questions about whether or not particular courses transferred to Madison.    She voiced her opinion that these questions were beyond the charge of UCC.

M/S/P to approve the proposal on the second reading.

   Proposal #13, CST 232, Listening, course offered occasionally; CST 300, Theory and Research in Communication Studies, prerequisites; CST 312, Analysis of Significant Speeches and Speakers, course deletion; CST 316, Literature in Performance, course deletion; CST 332, Intercultural Communication, prerequisites; CST 110, Essentials of Public Communication, title, course description; CST 273, Applied Radio, grading pattern, 1-2 credits, offered occasionally, repeatable for elective credit – maximum 2; CST 275, Applied Television, grading pattern, 1-2 credits, repeatable for elective credit – maximum 2; CST 291, Participation in CST Activities, course description, prerequisites, grading pattern, 1-3 credits; CST 351, Interviewing: Principles and Processes, title, number was CST 252, course description; CST 391, Practical Applications in CST, course description, prerequisites; CST 450, Internship in CST, prerequisites, grading pattern; Communication Studies Major: Persuasion and Public Communication Emphasis, electives; Persuasion and Public Communication Minor, electives; Communication Studies Major: Telecommunication Emphasis, required courses; Telecommunication Minor, required course;

Communication Studies Major: all emphasis areas, program admission requirement, effective Fall 2003.

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification Programs)

1)       Completion of a minimum of 45 semester credits with a GPA of 2.50, including courses taken at other institutions;

2)       Completion of CST 110, ENG 110 and CST 190 (or equivalent courses transferred from other institutions) with grades of at least B.  Students receiving a D or F in these courses on first attempt at UW-L may retake them to achieve the B grade (not B/C).  Students receiving less than a B in CST 110 at UW-L may obtain admission to the program by receiving a B or better in CST 210.  Students receiving less than a B in ENG 110 may obtain admission to the program by receiving a B or better in any 300 level ENG writing course.

To appeal these admission requirements, students must submit the following materials to CST Department Chairperson no later than midterm of the semester in which they want to be considered for admission to the program: a persuasive letter requesting waiver of the specific admission requirement(s) not met; a copy of the student’s current transcript or SNAP form; and a resume documenting experience and/or qualifications that justify admission to the program in spite of deficiencies in admission requirements.

M/S/P to approve proposal as recorded in 11/26/02 minutes with the exception to the above change to the Communication Studies Major: all emphasis areas.  These changes will not affect students currently in the program, but will apply to all future students.  It was noted that the prerequisites need to be reviewed for the classes due to the fact that students can take all of the classes required for the program without actually being accepted into the program.  The Department will look into this without restricting the rest of campus from these classes and bring changes to a future meeting.

   Proposal #21, Information Systems Major, credits, required courses, electives; I-S 330, Business Choices and Telecommunications Decisions, prerequisites; I-S 405, Information Systems Seminar,  number was I-S 400, prerequisites; I-S 401, Management Information Systems: Analysis Design, prerequisites.

   M/S/P to approve proposal as recorded in 11/26/02 minutes

 3. First Readings:

Proposal #24, MIC 120, Introduction to the Microbial Sciences, 1 credit, new course, effective Fall 2003.   The course introduces students to the nature and scope of biological sciences that involve microorganisms.  The importance, applications, and career opportunities in diverse areas of microbiology such as medical, molecular, food and industrial, ecological, environmental microbiology will be covered.  Current topics of microbiology and their impact on society will be covered.  The course introduces students to the various options in the microbiology major, and how microbiology can be related to other majors.  Offered Sem. II.

The Department would like to offer a course to freshmen or students interested in choosing Microbiology as their major.  Due to the lack to communication with incoming freshmen, the Department feels that this class would help attract more students by giving them a better understanding of the field.  This course does not overlap with Biology and will be team-taught by the faculty in Microbiology. 

M/S/P to approve proposal on the first reading.

 
Proposal #25, History Major,
electives, effective Fall 2003.

Core Requirements – 12 credits from HIS 210, 220, 230, 240, and 250 plus HIS 490 (four credits).

Public History Minor

(All colleges) – 24 credits.  The public history minor is an interdisciplinary undergraduate curriculum which prepares students to practice history outside of the academy, in non-teaching capacities, in the service of select public needs.  Required courses: ENG 307 or 308, POL 211 or MGT 308, HIS 320, 390, 450, and ARC 435, ART 354 and POL 313.

HIS 490, History Research Seminar, title, course description, effective Fall 2003.  A capstone course in historical research and writing: Themes and techniques or historical inquiry, research methods, use of primary sources, interpretation, and composition.  Completion of a significant research and writing project.  12 credits in history, excluding current registration. 

HIS 307, History with Documents, course number was HIS 495, 3 credits, effective Fall 2003.

HIS 338, Modern Middle East, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

HIS 357, History of the Balkans, course deletions, effective Fall 2003.

Course deletions made due to faculty member leaving.  The change in the minor will narrow the focus.  History has spoken with Political Science, Art, and Archaeology and all feel that this change is possible.  History would like HIS 267 to appear in Category 5 of the Major and will let the committee know about HIS 275. 

This was the first reading.  There will be a second reading.

Proposal #26, MTH 145,  Elementary Statistics, course number was MTH 205, prerequisites, effective Summer 2003.

Prerequisites: MTH 050 or an appropriate placement test score.

The change in course number to MTH 145 will better reflect the course.  Records and Registration will make appropriate changes in catalog where course is listed.  Emily Johnson will speak with Bruce Riley in regards to General Education.

M/S/P to approve proposal on the first reading.

 

Proposal #27, GEO 328, Geography of East and Southeast Asia, title, 3 credits, course description, effective Fall 2003.  The geography of China, Japan, the Koreas and Mongolia; the geography of the 10 states of Southeast Asia, including  Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Philippines, and Burma.  Contemporary geopolitical problems and prospects; East Asia and the world; primordial and historical factors contributing to identity and conflict.  Emphasis on human-cultural patterns, salient physical characteristics, and the relationship between these.  Offered every third semester.

GEO 318, The Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean, title, GEO 318 will replace GEO 316 and GEO 317, course description, effective Fall 2003.  The cultural and physical characteristics of Latin America and the Caribbean region are systematically examined and explained.  This includes an examination of diverse physical and “built” environments that encompass this region, from the borderlands of northern Mexico to the Tierra Del Fuego of the south; from the lush tropical environments of the Amazon, Jamaica and Puerto Rico, to the Altiplano and arid regions of the west; from disparate lowlands to the startling mountain zones of the Andes.  Indigenous civilizations which developed out of unique arrangements with these complex environments as well as those imposed since 1500 will be explored in depth.

GEO 317, The Geography of Middle America, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

GEO 316, Geography of South America, course deletion, effective Fall 2003.

These course changes will bring the courses more in line with terminology used in the Geography field.  Georges Cravins will speak with Eric Kraemer in regards to these changes and how they could affect programs in International Studies.  Andy Matchett will speak with History, Archaeology, Sociology and Business to discuss these changes and how they affect those areas.

This was a first reading.  There will be a second reading.

Proposal #28, SPA 305, Introduction to Hispanic Literature, course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2003.  An introductory literature course designed both for students desiring to develop an appreciation of Hispanic literature and those planning to pursue more advanced courses requiring a critical background.  The course may include works from the following genres: narrative, poetry, drama and essay.

SPA 315, Business Spanish, offered Sem. II., odd years, effective Fall 2003.

SPA 321, Spanish American Civilization, offered both semesters, effective Fall 2003.

SPA 331, Spanish Phonetics, prerequisites, effective Fall 2003.

Prerequisite: SPA 303.

SPA 351, Films in Spanish, prerequisites, offered occasionally, effective Fall 2003.

Prerequisites: SPA 303 and 304.

SPA 390, Topics in Hispanic Cultures, title, prerequisites, effective Fall 2003.

Prerequisites: SPA 303 and 304.

SPA 402, Spanish Literature II, title, effective Fall 2003.

SPA 420, Latin American Literature I, title, effective Fall 2003.

SPA 421, Latin American Literature II, title, effective Fall 2003.

SPA 425, Latino Literature of the United States, title, effective Fall 2003.

SPA 440, The Spanish Novel, offered occasionally, effective Fall 2003.

SPA 441, The Spanish Theatre, offered occasionally, effective Fall 2003.

Spanish Major, credits, required courses, effective Fall 2003.

(All colleges) – 30 credits above SPA 202.

A.            Category I: Core course requirements (21 credits)

            SPA 303, 304, 305, 320, or 321, 326, 331 and 430.

B.             Category II: One SPA 400-level course (3 credits)

Select one SPA 400-level literature course.  Prerequisite: SPA 305.

C.             Category III: Choose one course from the following (3 credits)

An additional SPA 400-level literature course, SPA 320 or 321 (whichever NOT taken in Category I), SPA 351, 390, 394 or 410.

D.            Category IV: Electives – select one course from the following (3 credits)

SPA 315, 320 or 321 (if not taken in Category III), SPA 351, 390, 394, an additional SPA 400-level literature course, APS 450, 475, 491, 495, 498, 499 or ENG 401.

Spanish Major with Business Concentration, credits, required course, electives, effective Fall 2003.

(All colleges) – 30 credits above SPA 202.

A.            Category I: Core course requirements (24 credits)

            SPA 303, 304, 305, 315, 320, 321, 326, and 331.

B.             Category II: One SPA 400-level course (3 credits)

            Select one SPA 400-level literature course.  Prerequisite: SPA 305.

C.             Category III: Elective.  Select one course from the following (3 credits)

SPA 351, 390, 394, an additional SPA 400-level literature course, SPA 410, 430, 450, 475, 491, 495, 498, 499 or ENG 401.

Note: Students should consult with an advisor in the Department of Modern Languages regarding their individual plan of study.  Teacher education students and those deciding on graduate studies in Spanish need to be aware of special requirements.  SPA 400-level literature courses include the following: SPA 401, 402, 403, 420, 421, 425, 440, 441 and 495.

 

SPA 303, Integrated Skills Development I, course description, effective Fall 2003.  Development of Spanish proficiency in speaking, reading, writing and listening with emphasis on reading and writing. Students will advance their cultural knowledge by working with a variety of texts.  Prerequisite: SPA 202.  Lect. 3, Lab. 2.

SPA 304, Integrated Skills Development II, course description, effective Fall 2003.  Development of Spanish proficiency in speaking, reading, writing and listening with emphasis on listening and speaking.  Students will advance their cultural knowledge by working with a variety of texts.  Prerequisite: SPA 202.  Lect. 3, Lab. 2.

SPA 320, Spanish Civilization, course description, effective Fall 2003.   A study of the civilization of Spain, from pre-historic times to the present; this includes such topics as political developments, geography, literature, art, music and the current situation.  Prerequisites: SPA 303 and 304.  Offered Sem. I.

SPA 326, Current Events, course description, prerequisites, effective Fall 2003.  A weekly discussion of current events in the Spanish-speaking world, based on readings, web-based news sources and television broadcasts in the target language.  Prerequisites: SPA 303 or 304.  Repeatable for credit, maximum 3.

SPA 403, Studies in Hispanic Literature, title, course description, effective Fall 2003.   A course designated to allow flexibility in the study of current topics of interest in Spanish or Latin American Literature.  Prerequisites: SPA 305 or equivalent.  Offered every two years.

SPA 430, Advanced Grammar and Syntax, course description, effective Fall 2003.  A comprehensive survey of grammatical principles with an examination of the main syntactical elements of Spanish language.  Prerequisites: SPA 303, 304.  Offered Sem. I.

FRE 326, Current Events, course description, effective Fall 2003.  A weekly discussion of current events in the French-speaking world, based on readings, web-based news sources and television broadcasts in the target language.  Prerequisites: FRE 202 or equivalent.  Students may take as many times as desired, but only three credits will count towards major/minor.

FRE 407, African and Caribbean Literature in French, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  A survey of African and Caribbean literature of French expression, including works from colonial times to the present, in the context of the political and cultural history of the African diaspora.  Prerequisite: FRE 305.  Offered every other Sem. II.

Don Socha distributed a handout combining all of the changes to a list format.  The Committee was asked if this was an easier method of review rather than reviewing each LX form.  The Committee agreed that this was an easier form of review.  The changes in this proposal were made for the purpose of “housekeeping”. 

M/S/P to approve proposal on the first reading.

Proposal #29, Philosophy Major, description for major, effective Fall 2003.

Philosophy Major

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) – 30 credits, including PHL 100, 101, 201 or 303, 205, 206, 496, and electives in philosophy.  Majors must take four philosophy courses at the 300/400 level including PHL 496.  No more than six credits of PHL 300/494/495 shall count towards the major.

 

PHL 229, Multicultural Philosophy in the United States, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  This survey course will examine philosophical ideas and systems that are generated from a wide range of cultural traditions found in the United States.  The aim of this search will be to broaden and deepen understanding and appreciation of the diversities of philosophies in the United States.  Prerequisite: PHL 100.  Offered every fourth semester.

PHL 230, International Multicultural Philosophy, title, instructional pattern, course description, effective Fall 2003.  This survey course will examine philosophical ideas and systems that are generated from a wide range of cultural traditions world-wide.  The aim of this search will be to broaden and deepen our understanding and appreciation of the multiplicity of philosophical perspectives which are part of an increasingly diverse, interconnected, and globalized world.  Prerequisites: PHL 100.  PHL 229 strongly suggested.  Offered every fourth semester.

PHL 310, Metaphysics, course description, effective Spring 2003.  Metaphysics is the science of what it is to be something.  Topics include: (1) how metaphysics differs from natural science, (2) in what sense is anything general, universal, particular, continuing, an event, a process, a substance, a process, a relation, abstract, subjective, or objective, (3) in what ways possible worlds can differ from this one, (4) what kind of thing could have body and a mind, (5) what the difference between a thing and its parts in an arrangement is, (6) what is required fro two seemingly different things to turn out to be the same thing, (7) how space and time differ from each other and other things, and (8) what natural laws and numbers are.  Prerequisite: PHL 100.  Offered every fourth semester.

PHL 331, Philosophy of Religion, course description, effective Fall 2003.  An examination of religion and religious experience.  Questions considered are: theories of the proper description of God, arguments for and against the existence of God, theories of the nature of the soul, arguments for and against the existence of souls and reincarnation, the role and evidential power of religious experience and organized religion in justified belief.   Prerequisite: PHL 100.  Offered every fourth semester.

PHL 401, World Ethics, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  An investigation of major ethical problems facing the works as a whole from an international perspective, including world medicine, international economic relations, world environmental ethics, international individual rights issues, world diversity concerns, and international conflict and cooperation.  Prerequisite: PHL 100 or GEO/POL/ANT/SOC/HIS 202.  Both are highly recommended.  Offered occasionally. 

PHL 431, Advanced Philosophy of Religion, 3 credits, new course, effective Fall 2003.  Selected  readings from recent scholarly journals and Medieval philosophy are the focus of the course and background for examination of topics such as: What justifies that Jesus is human?  Can God make a world permitting possible contradictions such as world in which there is an unstoppable cannonball and an immovable lamppost?  Exactly how do humans, persons and souls differ if they do?  Prerequisites: PHL 101 and PHL 331 strongly recommended.  Offered every fourth semester.

The Committee has asked the Department to reconsider the titles, course descriptions and prerequisites for PHL 331 and PHL 431. 

This was the first reading.  There will be a second reading.

4. Consent Agenda

    ESS 403, Advanced Strength Training Applications and Techniques, offered Sem. II, effective Fall 2003.

     M/S/P to approve consent agenda item.

5. Old Business    

6. New Business

 

DEAN APPROVED STUDENT PETITIONS

HPERTE: HUM 201 taken at UW-Green Bay, for ENG 200 to fulfill Gen Ed requirement.

HPERTE: HST 000Y–American Indian Studies taken at UW-Green Bay, to fulfill writing emphasis requirement.

 

The meeting adjourned at 5:56 p.m.  The next UCC meeting is January 28, 2003.

  

Diane L. Schumacher, UCC Secretary