Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Minutes

 November 30, 2004

 

Members Present:                Beth Cherne, Chris Frye, Ron Glass, Kenny Hunt, Terry Kelly, (chair), Jeff Baggett, Mandy Anderson, Paul Miller

 

Members Absent:                Ryan Vanloo (student association, Thanh Bui (student association), Joseph Kastantin

                                               

Consultants:                         Amelia Dittman, Diane Schumacher, Emily Johnson, Sandy Keller, Guy Herling, Carla Burkhardt

 

Guests:                                   Mike Winfrey, Mike Jackson, Gubbi Sudhakaran, Harun Rashid, Eric Kraemer, Bridget Teboh, Sheri Ross, Ray Martinez, Jeri Anibas

 

1.First Readings: Proposal #21, Microbiology Major, 40 cr., revise description, required courses.  All of the changes were approved for the 3 existing majors.  Just the new business concentration was held for Academic Planning Committee.

Pre-Professional Concentration

(Science and Allied Health, Business, Liberal Studies)-40 Microbiology/Biology credits:

A.  Biology Core:  BIO 101, 306, 312, 313

B.  Microbiology Core:  MIC 230, 406, 407, 416 or 425, 461

C.  Microbiology/Biology electives (six additional credits; at least three credits from List I, a maximum of two credits from List III):

                List I:  MIC 350, 420, 421, 416, 425, 426, 454

                List II:  BIO 406, 412, 413, 435, 463

                List III:  MIC 489, 499

D.    Additional Requirements:  One course in math (MTH 151, 175, 205, 207 or 250) eight credits of physics (PHY 103&104 or 203&204), and a minimum of 27 credits of chemistry including:  CHM 103, 104, 303, 304, 305, 301, 325 (or 417 and 418).

 

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.00 to stay in the Pre-professional Concentration within the Microbiology major.  Students who fall below a GPA of 3.00 will be given one additional semester to raise their GPA to 3.00.  Pre-professional Concentration Microbiology majors that do not maintain a GPA of 3.00 may transfer to the general Microbiology major.

 

Environmental Science Concentration

(Science and Allied Health, Business, Liberal Studies)-40 Microbiology/Biology credits:

A.   Biology Core:  BIO 101 and a second biology course (BIO 204, 210, or 303)

B.    Microbiology Core:  MIC 230, 350, 416, 425, 434, 461

C.    Microbiology/Biology electives (11 credits; at least five credits from List I*, at least three credits from list II, and a maximum of two credits from List III):

                List I:  MIC 406, 407, 420, 421, 427, 428, BIO 307 or 341 or 464*, 447, 448, 449

                List II:  BIO 406, 412, 463

                List III:  MIC 489, 499

D.    Additional Requirements: MTH 205 or 250 and 175 or 207; one course in physics (PHY 125 or 103&104 or 203&204), and a minimum of 24 credits of chemistry are required including:  CHM 103, 104, 300 (or 303, 304, and 305) 301, 325 (or 417 and 418).

 

   *           only one course (3 credits) from BIO 307, 341, 464 may be applied to elective requirements

 

In order for any Microbiology Majors (including concentrations) to continue in upper division microbiology coursework they must:

 

1.  complete BIO 101, a second BIO course (204, 210, 303, or 312) and MIC 230.

2.  complete three semesters of chemistry (CHM 103, 104 and 300 or 301 or 303).

3.  have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the six science courses listed above.

4.  complete one semester of math (MTH 150 or higher) with a grade of C or better.

 

Microbiology students may then apply for continuance in the Microbiology program (usually after the completion of three or four semesters).  Application materials may be obtained from the Microbiology advisor.  Admission is competitive and not all students meeting the minimum requirements are guaranteed admission.  Students not meeting the minimum requirements may petition for admission into the program and may be accepted depending on space availability.  The number allowed in the Microbiology Program is flexible and is dependent on room in upper-division microbiology courses.

 

The Microbiology Department incorporates a significant amount of writing throughout the required core courses instead of identifying particular courses as writing emphasis courses.  Students who complete the microbiology major, the microbiology major/pre-professional concentration or the microbiology major/environmental science concentration will fulfill the University writing emphasis requirement through the Microbiology Writing-in-the-Major Program

 

MIC 461, Capstone in Microbiology, 1 cr., revise description, prerequisites, grading pattern. Effective spring 2005

A seminar-style course designed for students to review and discuss basic concepts necessary for a career in microbiology and to assess their major.  This course will cover basic concepts of quantitative skills, computer literacy, and current topics microbiology.  Students are expected to actively participate in an assessment of their major, and participate in discussions on major issues and developments in the microbiological sciences.  Students will present a seminar on a contemporary microbiological topic incorporating primary literature. Prerequisites: Senior standing and must have completed all core microbiology classes by the end of the semester for which you are enrolling (letter grade).

MIC 499, Independent Research in Microbiology, 1-10 cr., revise maximum credits.  Effective spring 2005

change number of maximum credits from 1-3 to 1-10. Maximum 2 credits applicable to major.

Honors Program in Microbiology, revise program requirements

The Microbiology Honors Program is designed to recognize outstanding academic performance and understanding of research in microbiology.  Requirements for admission into the honors program are:

       1.  Junior standing

2.  Completion of the application for continuation in the major (completion of one semester math, three semesters of chemistry, and 12 credits in the major including MIC 230).

3.  Provide a transcript demonstrating a 3.25 GPA in biology, chemistry and microbiology courses and a cumulative overall GPA of 3.25.

4.  Recommendation by two faculty members from the department.

 

Requirements for earning a degree with Honors in Microbiology include:

 

1. Completion of all major requirements with a cumulative GPA in the major of 3.5 and a cumulative overall GPA of 3.25

2. Completion of a minimum of two credits of MIC 499

3. Presentation of results of MIC 499 research at a colloquium of faculty and students or a professional meeting

 

Students graduating with Honors in Microbiology will receive an honors certificate.

 

M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal with the new Microbiology-Business Concentration removed. This needs to go through Academic Planning Committee.

 

Clinical Laboratory Science Major (Science and Allied Health, Business), revise credits, required courses, recommended courses to complement major

Pre-professional Curriculum (38-46 credits):

All pre-CLS majors are strongly encouraged to take CLI 120, Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science.

A.      Biology Core (16 credits): BIO 105*, 306, 312, 313

B.       Chemistry Core (15-18 credits): CHM 103, 104, 300, (or 303, 304 & 305)

C.       Microbiology Core (4 credits): MIC 230

D.      Mathematics Core (3-8 credits): MTH 145 (or MTH 250) and MTH 150 or placement above MTH 150

Pre-CLS students must have completed substantial portion of these requirements in the semester that they apply for formal admission to the CLS major.

 

*BIO 103 may be substituted for BIO 105

 

Professional Curriculum (54-59 credits):

Pre-Clinical Phase (22-27 credits; on campus) CLI 395, 410, 420, 440, (or BIO 406), 461, MIC 406, 407 CHM 325, (or 417 & 418).

Clinical Phase (31 credits at the internship site): CLI 450, 455, 460, 465, 470, 480

The following courses are recommended to complement the Clinical Laboratory Science Major:  BIO 413, 424, 435, 436, 466; MIC 416, 420, 421, 454; CLI 495, 496; ECO 110, PHL 201

 

NOTE: The Clinical Laboratory Science program incorporates a significant amount of writing throughout the required courses instead of identifying particular courses as writing emphasis courses.  Students who complete the Clinical Laboratory Science major, will fulfill the University writing emphasis requirement through the CLS Writing-in-the-Major Program.

 

CLI 395, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, 2 cr., revise instructional pattern, course description, semester offered. Effective spring 2005

Decrease lab from 3 to 2 hours, move from Sem I offering to Sem II.  This course introduces the formation, distribution, and function of urine and other non-blood body fluids.  Instruction in the handling and analysis of these fluids will be given based on their chemical, physical, and cellular composition in health and disease.  The laboratory focuses on performing and interpreting results from the clinical laboratory procedures performed in the lab.

CLI 410, Clinical Hematology, 3 r., revise instructional pattern. Effective fall 2005

Decrease lab from 3 to 2 hours.

CLI 420, Immunohematology, 3 cr., prerequisites.  Effective summer 2005

Delete CLI 390 from prerequisites (CLI 390 no longer exists). Now: admission to CLS program.

CLI 435, Research Design and Methods in Medical Laboratory Science, 1 cr., course deletion, effective spring 2005

CLI 440/540, Clinical Parasitology, 1 cr., revise instructional pattern, prerequisites, convert to slash course.  Effective spring 2005

Delete MIC 407 from prerequisites, change from summer to Sem II offering, not open to students who have credits in BIO 406/506 added to restrictions.

CLI 450, Clinical Chemistry, 6 cr., prerequisites. Effective spring 2005

Delete CLI 390 from prerequisites (CLI 390 no longer exists). Now: admission to CLS program and acceptance to a hospital NAACLS accredited CLS program

CLI 461, Capstone in Clinical Laboratory Science, 1 cr., new course, effective summer 2005

A seminar style course in clinical laboratory science.  The course will cover topics of current interest in the field such as emerging infectious diseases and testing, new concepts in instrumentation or evolution of new tests from basic research to clinical application.  Students will participate in curriculum selection for part of this class to help them prepare for pre-clinical competency exams at their hospital sites. Prerequisites: Acceptance to an internship site, senior standing and CLS major.  Offered summer session.

CLI480, Laboratory Management and Education, revise description, credits. Effective spring 2005

Change number of credits from 2 to 3.

A course designed to introduce senior students to skills and knowledge required to manage a clinical laboratory and educate future clinical laboratory scientists.  Students will participate with lab managers in activities such as ordering supplies, quality control, quality management and quality improvement.  They will be introduced to human resource management, financial management, scheduling issues, instrumental selection for profitability and the processes involved in preparing for laboratory inspections and maintaining JCAHO and CAP laboratory accreditation.

There was discussion about the appropriate number of credits for this course, which is part of the clinical phase.  The result was 3 cr.

CLI 496, Special Topics in Clinical Laboratory Science, 1-3 cr., revise title.  Effective spring   2005

CLI 499, Independent Research in Clinical Laboratory Science, 1-3 cr., revise title, description.  Effective fall 2005

An opportunity to pursue individual research topics under the direction of a faculty member. Depending on the nature of the research project, study is expected to involve substantial laboratory or theoretical work in addition to literature review and instruction.  Students are expected to develop research skills related to clinical laboratory science.  In addition to a written report to the supervising faculty member, expected outcomes may include: laboratory notebooks, experimental devices, software, papers and presentations to departments and regional meetings.

 

M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

Proposal #22, ESS 442, Aging and Physical Activity, 2 cr., revise restrictions.  Effective summer 2005

Must be accepted into the ESS major-fitness emphasis or have a declared emphasis in Gerontology.

 

M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

Proposal #23, Admission Criteria for Physical Education Teacher Education, 53 cr., revise admission criteria.  Effective fall 2005

Admission to the physical education teacher education (PETE) program is competitive and   successful completion of application requirements does not guarantee admission into the program.  Students who wish to be considered for acceptance into the (PETE) program will be evaluated using the following scaled criteria: physical fitness assessment, grade point average of foundation courses (ESS 112, ESS 115, BIO 103, or 105, HPR 105), 2.75 combined cumulative grade point average (including transfer grade points), passage of all parts of the pre-professional skills test (PPST), K-12 athletic/teacher leadership involvement and reflection, a satisfactory interview with PETE admission committee members, and a background check.  Students admitted into the PETE program must maintain a 2.75 grade point average.  Approximately thirty students per semester are allowed into the PETE major.  Course substitutions may be authorized by the program director.  Curriculum changes may result in a revision of fundamental courses used as admission requirements.  In order to enroll in student teaching and clinical courses, students must have earned and maintained a 2.75 combined cumulative GPA and a 2.75 GPA in the major, minor, concentration and professional course work.

Students are allowed two attempts for admission to the program during their academic career at UW-L. This strengthens the admission requirements by adding new criteria specific to the program.  Previously requirements were based solely on admission to teacher education. The fitness tests are intended to measure and assist students’ commitment to a healthy life style, not fitness level perse.  There is an appeal process.  This is retroactive to all catalogs, excluding the limit on number of attempts allowed.

M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

Proposal #24, Geoarchaeology Minor, 22 cr., revise required courses. Effective fall 2005

            Replace ARC 200 with ARC 195.

               GEO/ESC 427, Water Resources, 3 cr., revise course description. Effective spring 2005

A study of physical water resources systems and management and utilization of water as a resource.  Class activities will include seminars on critical water resources management issues and hands-on analysis of pertinent data, including exercises in Geographic Information Systems.

ESC 222, Landforms: Processes and Regions, 4 cr., revise title, description.  Effective fall 2005

An introduction to the earth surface processes that are dominant in forming various types of landforms.  Spatial variations in landform will be studied both at the local scale and as the outcome of large-scale global processes, including the effects of plate tectonics and global climatic change.

 

  M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

Proposal #25, Physics Major, revise required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 38 credits, including 32 29 credits of the following core courses: PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, 321, 332, 334, 343, 401 and at least six nine credits from electives numbered higher than PHY 250 or from any AST course.

Physics Major with Computational Physics Emphasis, revise required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 39 credits, including: PHY 103 or 203, PHY 104 or 204, 250, 311, 374, 474 464; C-S 220; and at least one credit of PHY 498 with a computational project; and 14 additional credits including: PHY 302, 303, 321, 332, 334, 343, 401, 1-2 physics courses at the 300/400 level; up to an additional 2 credits of PHY 498 (computational); up to six credits from C-S 270, C-S 340, C-S 351, or MTH 371, MTH 480.

Physics Major with Optics Emphasis, revise required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 40 credits, including: PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, 321, 332, 334, 335, 343, 401, 476; and three credits of PHY 498 with a project in optics and electives in physics at the 300/400 level. (This emphasis is also especially suitable for chemistry students.)

Physics Major with Biomedical Concentration, revise credits, required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 55 56 credits. A minimum of 28 32 credits of Physics, including PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, 334, 335, and at least 11 eight additional credits of electives in physics numbered higher than PHY 250.  A minimum of 21 24 credits outside physics, including the following required courses MTH 145 or 250, 309; CHM 300 (or CHM 303, 304, 305 or CSC H-P 421); BIO 312, 313; and additional electives in biology, chemistry, health professions, mathematics and/or microbiology at the 300/400 level.

Physics Major with Business Concentration, revise required courses, electives

All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 55 credits.  A minimum of 28 credits of Physics, including PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, 334, 335, and at least eight additional credits of electives in physics numbered higher than PHY 250 or from any AST course.  A minimum of 24 credits outside physics, including the following required courses ECO 110, 120; ACC 221, 222; FIN 355; MKT 309; MGT 308, 408; and additional electives in accounting, economics, finance, management and/or marketing at the 300/400 level and physics.

Physics Minor, removal of additional wording

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 24 credits, including 13 credits of the following core courses: PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 311 and at least 11 credits from electives numbered higher than PHY 250 or from any AST course. Students also have the option of concentrating their studies in computational physics or optics by choosing their electives appropriately. (This minor is also especially suitable for chemistry, computer science and mathematics students.)

Physics Major with Astronomy Emphasis, revise credits, required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 40 39 credits, including the following 37 credits: AST 155, 156, 362, 363, 466; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 311, 321, 332; and 3 credits from Physics and Astronomy courses at the 300/400 level (excluding PHY 320, 376, 386, 497).  If PHY/AST 498 is chosen, the research must be astronomy related 343, 302, 303 or 401.

Physics Minor with Astronomy Emphasis, revise credits, required courses, electives

(All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 24 23 credits, including: AST 155, 156, 363; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, and 302 electives from any AST courses. (This minor is also especially suitable for chemistry, computer science and mathematics students.)

 

Dual Degree Program in Engineering and Physics, revise required courses, electives

This is a dual degree program which enables a student to receive both a Bachelor of Science (Physics major) from UW-La Crosse and a Bachelor of Science (Engineering major) from UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Platteville, or the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. The total length of time for both degrees is expected to be five years, with approximately three years at UW-La Crosse (dating from enrollment in MTH 207) and approximately two years at UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Platteville, or the U. of Minnesota. At UW-La Crosse, students must complete a minimum of 85 credits, including the General Education requirements (students are recommended to include ECO 110, and ECO 120 and ECO 336); and CHM 103, 104; C-S 120; MTH 207, 208, 309, 310; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250 and four out of the following seven courses: PHY 302, 303, 311, 321, 332, 334, 335 and 343. 401; plus an additional three credits in PHY 498 or other courses in any area of experimental physicsAdditional courses (such as BIO 105, CHM 104, C-S 120, MTH 250 and/or MTH 353) may be required depending on the specific engineering discipline – be sure to consult the Physics Department dual-degree advisor for details. 

 

Students wishing a dual degree in Chemical Engineering and Physics via this program must also complete CHM 301 an additional specified course (or courses) in chemistry.

 

Students wishing a dual degree in Biomedical Engineering and Physics via this program must complete a minimum of 85 credits at UW-La Crosse, including the General Education requirements (students are recommended to include ECO 110, ECO 120 and ECO 336) and CHM 103, 104; MTH 207, 208, 309, 310; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311, and additional specified courses in biology, chemistry, microbiology, mathematics and physics. 

 

     Students who express interest in the dual degree program will be selected for entrance into the UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Platteville, or U. of Minnesota, Twin Cities portion of the program based on their G.P.A. in all coursework; their G.P.A. in the chemistry, computer science, mathematics, and physics coursework required by the program; and the positive recommendation of the UW-La Crosse Physics Department Chair (or designee). Qualified UW-La Crosse applicants are assured admission in the College of Engineering at UW-Madison or UW-Milwaukee; the College of Engineering, Mathematics & Sciences at UW-Platteville or the Institute of Technology at U. of Minnesota.

     In order to receive the B.S. degree (Physics major) from UW-La Crosse, dual-degree students must also complete the remaining 35 credits (to total a minimum of 120 credits) in engineering at UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Platteville, or U. of Minnesota and transfer these credits to UW-La Crosse. For the typical student, the remaining 35 credits must include at least 15 credits at the 300 level or above and at least 13 credits from the Engineering College or Institute College of Engineering, College of Engineering, Mathematics & Sciences, or the Institute of Technology. This transfer of credits and awarding of the B.S. degree (Physics major) by UW-L can take place as soon as the student earns the necessary credits.

 

Dual Degree Program in Physical Therapy and Physics, 120 cr., new program, effective fall 2005

This is a dual degree program which enables a student to receive both a Bachelor of Science (Physics major with Biomedical Concentration) and a graduate degree (Physical Therapy) from UW-La Crosse.  The total length of time for both degrees is expected to be five and a half years, with approximately three years in the Physics program and approximately two and a half years in the Physical Therapy program.  During the first three years of undergraduate coursework in the UW-L Physics program, students must complete at least 60 credits in biology, chemistry, mathematics, microbiology, and physics to fulfill requirements of the Physics degree (Biomedical Concentration) except for 3 courses fulfilled by physical therapy coursework.  During those same three years, dual-degree students must fulfill UW-L general education courses for the physical therapy program.  Therefore, the undergraduate portion of the program would include a minimum of 85 credits, including the General Education requirements and BIO 105, 312 and 313; CHM 103, 104; MTH 207, 208, 309; MTH 145 or 250; PHY 103 or 203, 104 or 204, 250, 302, 303, 311 and 334 and 3 credits each of psychology and sociology.  During the first four semesters of physical therapy coursework, the following courses passed with a grade of C or better will fulfill requirements toward the Physics undergraduate major degree and will be subsequently waived from the physical therapy graduate degree requirements for that student: H-P 421; PHY 423 and 483.  Additional coursework taken in the physical therapy program may count toward electives needed for the undergraduate physics degree.  Be sure to consult the Physics Department dual-degree advisor for details regarding this program. 

 

Physics Department Honors Program, revise program requirements                                      

Honors Program

Physics with Honors or Astronomy with Honors

I. Admission

A.    Junior standing

B.    15 credits in physics or astronomy including one 300-level course

C.    3.25 cumulative grade point average in physics/or astronomy courses and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average overall

D.    Recommended by two a faculty members in the Physics Department

II. Program

A.    Completion of a regular major program in physics (which may also include an emphasis or concentration)

B.    PHY 497: Physics and Astronomy Seminar, 1 cr.

C.    PHY 498: Physics and Astronomy Research, 3 cr.

III. Evaluation

A.            A cumulative 3.50 grade point average in physics at the time of graduation and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average overall

B.    Distinguished performance on a project in a relevant research area developed in PHY 498

C.    Presentation of the project developed in PHY 498 to a seminar of faculty and students

IV. Methods of Implementation Admission

A.    Admission

A.    Announcement of program in sophomore-level physics and astronomy classes

B.    Student must submit an application form to the Department Chair that should include

1.     The student’s academic record

2.     The student’s reasons for wishing to participate

3.     The signatures of two a faculty members in physics endorsing the application

B.    Program

1.             PHY 497: Physics and Astronomy Seminar will be offered each semester

2.     PHY 498: Physics and Astronomy Research will be offered each semester

V. Recognition

A.    Honors certificate

B.    Notation on permanent academic record

 

Physics Department Honors Program with Astronomy

Emphasis Requirements

I. Admission

A. Junior standing

B. 15 credits in physics or astronomy including one 300-level course

C. 3.25 cumulative grade point average in physics or astronomy courses and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average

D. Recommended by two faculty members in Physics Department

II. Program

A. Completion of a regular major program in physics with astronomy emphasis

B. AST 497: Physics and Astronomy Seminar, 1 cr.

C. AST 498: Physics and Astronomy Research, 3 cr.

III. Evaluation

A. A cumulative 3.50 grade point average in physics and astronomy at the time of graduation and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average

B. Distinguished performance on a project developed in AST 498

C. Presentation of the project developed in AST 498 to a seminar of faculty and students

IV. Methods of Implementation

A. Admission

1. Announcement of program in sophomore-level physics and astronomy classes

2. Application form

a. Academic record

b. Reasons for wishing to participate

c. Signatures of two faculty members in physics

B. Program

1. AST 497: Physics and Astronomy Seminar will be offered each semester

2. AST 498: Physics and Astronomy Research will be offered each semester

V. Recognition

A. Honors certificate

B. Notation on permanent academic record

All astronomy emphasis majors and minors are strongly encouraged to register for one credit of AST 497 every semester.

       

                Miscellaneous (Note) listed under major, revise information

                All physics majors and minors are strongly encouraged to register for one credit of PHY 497 each

                semester of their first year.

Mathematics majors wishing a double major in mathematics and physics may count PHY 461 (cross-listed with MTH 461) and PHY 470 for credit in both the mathematics major and the physics major.  Mathematics majors may count PHY 461 (cross-listed with MTH 461) and PHY 470 for credit in both the mathematics major and the physics minor.

                PHY 104, Fundamental Physics II, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                MTH 150 and PHY 103 recommended

                PHY 204, General Physics II, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 103 or 203; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 250, Modern Physics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

PHY 104 or 204; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment. PHY 250 and PHY 311 are recommended to be taken concurrently

                PHY 302, Optics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 104 or 204; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 303, Optics Laboratory, 1 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 104 or 204; PHY 311 recommended; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 311, Experimental Physics, 2 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 104 or 204; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment. PHY 250 and PHY 311 are recommended

                to be taken concurrently

                PHY 332, Electrodynamics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 104 or 204; PHY 311 recommended; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 335, Electronics, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 334

                PHY 343, Thermodynamics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 250; MTH 309 or concurrent enrollment; PHY 311 recommended

                PHY 362, Astrophysics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

PHY 250 and 302; AST 155 or AST 156 or permission of instructor. (Cross-listed with AST; may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both

                PHY/AST 363, Astrophysics Lab, 1 cr., revise course description, prerequisites, credits

PHY 104 or 204; MTH 151; AST 155 or AST 156 or permission of instructor. (Cross-listed with AST; may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both

 

                PHY 423, Biomechanics of Human Movement, 3 cr., revise prerequisites

                PHY 103 or 203; MTH 309; BIO 312

                PHY 432, Advanced Electrodynamics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 332; PHY 301 recommended; MTH 353 or concurrent enrollment

PHY 453/553, Topics in Physics and Astronomy, 1-3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

PHY 104 or 204

                PHY 460, Condensed Matter Physics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 250; MTH 310

                PHY 466, Cosmology and the Structure of the Universe, 3 cr., revise title, course description,                               

                prerequisites

                PHY 250 and 302; MTH 310; AST 156 or permission of the instructor. (Cross-listed with AST;

                may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both.

                PHY 472, Particle Physics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 401; MTH 310

                PHY 476, Advanced Optics, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 302 and 303; PHY 332 or concurrent enrollment

                PHY 483, Instrumentation in Biomechanics, 3 cr., revise prerequisites

                PHY 423

                PHY 497, Physics and Astronomy Seminar, 1 cr., revise course description,                 

                repeatable credits and misc. info

                Repeatable for credit to a maximum of four credits-a maximum of two credits can be used to

                satisfy elective requirements. Pass/Fail grading. (Cross-listed with AST;

                may only earn credit in PHY or AST, not both.

PHY 498, Physics and Astronomy Research, 1-3 cr., revise course description, credits and misc. Info

                PHY 103, Fundamental Physics I, 4 cr., revise course description

                PHY 203, General Physics I, 4 cr., revise course description

                PHY 320, Statics, 3 cr., new course, effective spring 2005

                Principles of statics and free-body diagrams with applications to simple trusses, frames,

and machines.  Includes topics in force/moment vectors, resultants, distributed loads, internal forces in beams, properties of areas, moments of inertia and the laws of friction. Prerequisites: PHY 103 or 203; MTH 208 or concurrent enrollment. Offered occasionally.

PHY 334, Electrical Circuits, 3 cr., new course, effective fall 2005new course, effective fall 2005

Physical principles underlying modeling of circuit elements and fundamentals of analog electrical circuits are explored through lecture and laboratory. Topics will include the following: current and voltage sources, resistors, I-V characteristics, Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s Laws, capacitors, inductors; Thevenin and Norton theorems; circuits in sinusoidal steady state; diodes, transistors (bipolar junction and field-effect); op-amps; elementary amplifier circuits. PHY 104 or 204; MTH 309 or concurrent enrollment; PHY 311 recommended. Offered Sem II.

                PHY 125, Physics for the Life Sciences, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 321, Classical Mechanics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 374, Computational Physics, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 401, Quantum Mechanics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 470, Advances Quantum Mechanics, 3 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                PHY 474, Advanced Computational Physics, 4 cr., revise course description, prerequisites

                Course descriptions are on file in the Records & Registration office.

The committee agreed that they would like more time to look at the course descriptions for this proposal. These changes are the result of assessment information, new faculty expertise, and feedback from engineering programs.

This was a first reading; there will be a second reading.

 

                Proposal #26, History, New courses, effective fall 2005

HIS 285, Introduction to African Civilization, 3 cr. This survey course is designed to introduce students to the civilizations of Africa as well as the experiences of African people before the 19th century.  Focusing on African cultural heritage, it examines religious, economic and political shifts in state formation as ancient African kingdoms and empires rose and fell. Offered Sem II every three years.

HIS 385, Modern African History, 3 cr. This course explores the history of Africa from 1800 to    present.  It focuses on the economic, political, social, and cultural forces that have shaped African societies.  It examines continuities and changes by looking at ways in which Africans defined their needs under increasing external pressures.  Topics include: colonization, nationalism, independence, post-colonial nation states, women’s movements and neocolonialism. Offered Sem I.

HIS 386, Women and Gender in Africa, 3 cr.  An examination of gender and power in Africa, and the historical roots of inequality as experienced by women in the social, economic, religious and political spheres during the 19th and 20th centuries.  Course combines case studies on: Queens, goddesses, warriors, and gender systems, with thematic issues such as gender related impact of colonialism, resistance, African feminism, women politicians and empowerment to provide a vivid image of the state of gender relations in Africa. Offered Sem I.  Will be category C elective in the W-S minor. 

HIS 387, African Novels and History, 3 cr. An introduction to the intellectual and cultural history of Sub-Saharan Africa and the experiences of African people in the 20th century specifically through novels.  Emphasis on historical theory and research methods.  African novels are used as sources of information to deepen understanding of African history.  Offered Sem II every other year.

 HIS 388, Comparative Slave Systems, 3 cr. A study of the commonalities and differences between slave systems in Africa and the Americas which explores conditions in communities created by slaves and escaped slaves from Brazil, the Caribbean and the southern United States.  Focus on the impact of the slave trade, the abolition and the nature of historical consciousness within Africa and the African Diaspora. Offered Sem I every 3 years.

 

            English department consulted-no objections.

                M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

Proposal #27, PHL 240, Philosophy of Love, Sex and Friendship, 3 cr., new course. Effective fall 2005

An examination into the nature of a variety of kinds of love; including love of knowledge, love of friends, erotic love, parental love.  Philosophical consideration of topics such as monogamy, polygamy, prostitution, homosexuality and the institution of marriage.  Prerequisite: PHL 100 will be an elective in the PHL major and minor.  Offered once every four semesters.

 

  M/S/P to waive second reading and approve proposal

 

 

      4.     Old business:  None                                           

      5.     New business:  None         

 

Meeting adjourned at 6:20 p.m. The next UCC meeting is set for December 14, 2004.

             

Diane Schumacher

UCC Secretary