UW-L Graduate Course Catalog GIF image

Adult Fitness/Cardiac Rehabilitation

Health Education and Health Promotion

Biology

Master of Public Health in Community Health Education

Business Administration

Physical Therapy

College Student Development & Administration

Reading

Education -- Professional Development

Recreation Management and Therapeutic Recreation

Exercise and Sport Science - Sport Administration

School Psychology

Exercise and Sport Science - Physical Education Teaching

Software Engineering

Exercise and Sport Science - Human Performance

Special Education


ADULT FITNESS/CARDIAC REHABILITATION
 
A 43-credit program leading to a master of science degree, Adult Fitness/Cardiac Rehabilitation provides the necessary theoretical, laboratory, research, and clinical experiences for employment in adult fitness, corporate fitness, and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation settings. Each year's class (15 students) entering the four semester program -- summer, fall, spring, summer -- receives practical, hands-on experience in cooperation with area hospitals and clinics. In addition, students also participate in the La Crosse Exercise and Health Program (LEHP) which provides adult fitness, Phase III and IV cardiac rehabilitation programming, and health and nutrition services to over 300 patients each week. Phase I and II cardiac rehabilitation experiences are attained in area hospitals. The required internship -- three months during the last semester -- presents opportunities for further experience in a student's area of choice. The completion of a thesis project is required before the student is allowed to begin the internship.
Degree candidates typically have an undergraduate degree in physical education, fitness, exercise science, or other allied health related fields such as biology, health education, nursing, or physical therapy. A minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.00 is required for admission. Application deadline is February 1 of each year.
 
 
Graduates are prepared to:
-- conduct graded exercise tests
-- design exercise programs for healthy and diseased populations
-- organize and administer adult fitness, corporate fitness, and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programs
 
Graduates are employed in:
-- colleges and universities
-- adult fitness centers (public, private, and corporate)
-- clinic, hospital, and "free standing" rehabilitation facilities
-- sports medicine centers
 
 
Prerequisites or their equivalent for admission into the program are:
Credits
ESS205Human Anatomy3
ESS206Human Physiology3
ESS281Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries2
ESS302Physiology of Exercise2
 
 
Category A -- Research
(12 credits)
Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
EFN735Interpretation of Statistical Data3
ESS799Research: Thesis6
 

 

Category B -- Core Requirements
(31 credits) Credits
ESS744Laboratory Techniques for Adult Fitness/Cardiac Rehabilitation3
ESS770Physiology of Activity3
ESS774Clinical Practicum in Cardio-Pulmonary Rehabilitation2
ESS775Practicum in AF2
ESS776Practicum in Phase III/IV Cardiac Rehabilitation3
ESS780Philosophy and Organization of Preventive and Rehabilitative Programs2
ESS781Program Leadership in Adult Fitness/Cardiac Rehabilitation1
ESS782Electrocardiography3
ESS783Graded Exercise Testing/Exercise Prescription3
ESS784Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology3
ESS785Internship: Adult Fitness/Cardiac Rehabilitation5
ESS786Advanced Cardiac Life Support1
 
Total Credits 43

 

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BIOLOGY
 
The Master of Science in Biology program is a multi-disciplinary program that allows students advanced study in several traditional and non-traditional areas of biology. Students have the option of a general M.S. degree in biology or may obtain an M.S. degree in biology with a formal concentration in aquatic science, cellular and molecular biology, clinical microbiology, micro-biology, nurse anesthesia, or physiology. Admission to the program is based, in part, on scores on the GRE general exam, undergraduate grade point average (G.P.A.), letters of recommendation, and on individually prescribed undergraduate course work to meet prerequisite requirements for each concentration. Each student will choose a major adviser and an advisory committee during the first semester of residence. This committee will assist the student in drafting the student's plan of study, which will dictate the student's curriculum for the ensuing semesters. All students complete a capstone experience. Students obtaining the M.S. Biology or M.S. Biology: Concentration in Clinical Microbiology complete a thesis or seminar paper. Students obtaining the M.S. Biology: Concentration in Aquatic Science, Concentration in Cellular and Molecular Biology, Concentration in Microbiology, or Concentration in Physiology complete a thesis. Students obtaining the M.S. Biology: Concentration in Nurse Anesthesia complete extensive clinical training.
 
Biology Graduate Student Requirements
 
All graduate students in biology must meet the following requirements:
 
1. Prior to registration each semester, the student must consult with the major adviser.
2. Submit a written thesis or seminar paper proposal to the advisory committee prior to the midterm of the second semester of residence. CRNA students are exempt from this requirement and are not required to complete a thesis or seminar paper as part of the degree program.
3. Enroll in BIO 751 or MIC 751, Graduate Seminar, during the first four semesters of residence. Two of the semesters must be taken for one credit each; the other two semesters will be taken on an audit (no credit) basis. CRNA students are exempt from this requirement.
4. Students who are on campus, utilizing university staff and/or facilities must enroll for a minimum of two credit hours per term, including fall or spring semester, and summer sessions.
5. Students are encouraged to complete an appropriate graduate course (numbers 500 and above) from outside the Department of Biology and Department of Microbiology. Upon approval of a student's advisory committee, a student may be permitted to take a maximum of 10 graduate credits in other departments.
6. Graduate assistants are required to enroll as full-time students during the first two semesters of residence.
7. Pass a preliminary oral examination covering the student's area of specialty and advanced course work.
8. Complete at least 15 credits of 700-level course work.
9. Consult this catalog and the departments' graduate student guidelines for additional policies pertaining to graduate students in a biology program.
 
M.S. BIOLOGY
 
This traditional master's degree program is designed to provide the most beneficial learning opportunities based on career goals and the student's area of focus. Intended for students who do not plan to obtain one of the formal concentrations within the M.S. Biology program. Students are required to (1) complete a thesis or seminar paper in an area of biology, (2) pass an oral comprehensive exam, and (3) complete 30 credits
selected by the student and the advisory committee.
 
 
AQUATIC SCIENCE CONCENTRATION
 
This concentration requires (1) completion of a research thesis in an area of aquatic science, (2) passing an oral comprehensive exam, and (3) completion of 30 credits with at least 15 credits from the following list; remaining credits are to be selected by the student and the advisory committee.
 
Credits
BIO505Aquatic Vascular Plants2
BIO514Freshwater Invertebrate Zoology3
BIO519Quantitative Methods in Ecology3
BIO522Ichthyology3
BIO523Fisheries Management3
MIC534Aquatic Microbial Ecology3
BIO538Physics and Chemistry of Surface Ground Water3
BIO547Standard Methods and Quality Assurance of Water Analyses3
BIO548Aquatic Toxicology4
BIO563Aquatic Animal Health3
BIO564Stream Ecology3
BIO711Aquatic Contaminants2
BIO799Research: Master's
Thesis1-6
 
Total Credits 30
 
 
With the approval of the student's advisory committee, other courses may be substituted for those listed.

CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY CONCENTRATION
 
This concentration requires (1) completion of a research thesis in an area of cellular or molecular biology, (2) passing an oral comprehensive exam, and (3) completion of 30 credits with at least 15 credits from the following list; remaining credits are to be selected by the student and the advisory committee.
 
Credits
MIC516Microbial Genetics5
BIO532Biology of Cancer2
BIO535Molecular Biology 3
BIO536Molecular Biology Lab1
BIO537Plant Growth and Development3
BIO543Molecular Mechanisms of Disease3
BIO563Aquatic Animal Health3
BIO714Advanced Genetics3
BIO799Research: Master's
Thesis1-6
 
Total Credits 30
 
 
With the approval of the student's advisory committee, other courses may be substituted for those listed.
 
 
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY CONCENTRATION
 
This concentration is offered by the Department of Biology and Department of Microbiology, Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center, Marshfield Laboratories/St. Joseph's Hospital/Marshfield Clinic, and the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene. This program involves on-campus didactic training, nine full-time weeks of clinical rotations at Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center, six full-time weeks in clinical laboratories at Marshfield Laboratories/St. Joseph's Hospital/ Marshfield Clinic, and two full-time weeks at the Wisconsin Laboratory of Hygiene. Students who complete the Concentration in Clinical Microbiology are eligible to secure Specialist Microbiologist (SM-AAM) certification of the American Academy of Microbiology. The combination of classroom education, clinical rotations and research experience will prepare students for a variety of employment opportunities including: (1) supervisory positions in medical centers and public health and private reference laboratories, (2) research, marketing, and sales in select industries, and
(3) basic research. This concentration requires (1) completion of a research thesis (Plan A--Thesis) or seminar paper (Plan B--Non-Thesis) in an area of clinical microbiology, (2) passing an oral comprehensive exam, and (3) completion of the core curriculum of a minimum of 31 credits (Plan A) or 33 credits (Plan B).

Admission Requirements
 
1. Individuals accepted into the Clinical Microbiology program must hold a Bachelor of Science Degree or equivalent in Microbiology, Biology, or a related field with competency in Microbiology. Graduates with a Medical Technology Degree from a program accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences are also eligible.
 
Minimum prerequisites for admission to the program are MIC 230 (Fundamentals of Microbiology), MIC 406/506 (Immunology), MIC 407/507 (Pathogenic Bacteriology), or comparable courses. A strong chemistry background including Biochemistry is strongly recommended. Students lacking prerequisites may be conditionally admitted to the concentration contingent on remediation of prerequisites. Remediated prerequisite courses do not count toward the MS degree.
 
2. Cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of not less than 2.85.
 
3. Completion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). A score of 1500 for the total general test scores for verbal, qualitative, and analytical measures is strongly recommended.
 
4. Students must complete an "Application for Admission to Graduate Study" form. Students requesting financial aid must also complete the "Application for Graduate Assistantship" form.
 
5. Three current letters of recommendation (forms provided with admission application).
 
6. An application letter which details:
-- academic and professional goals
-- previous relevant experiences
-- reasons for selecting program
 
7. Completed application forms, letters of recommendation, and applicant letter must be returned to the Admissions Office by February 1. A review committee will assess all submitted materials and a letter of decision will be sent to the applicant. An interview may be required in some instances. Acceptance or non-acceptance is based upon a comprehensive review of all elements of the completed application.
 
Core Curriculum
Plan A -- Thesis Credits
MIC 500Orientation to Clinical Microbiology1
MIC 554Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenicity2
MIC 751Graduate Seminar2
MIC 753Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases2
MIC 755Advanced Immunology2
MIC 770Clinical Microbiology-Practicum I5
MIC 780Clinical Microbiology-Practicum II4
MIC 790Clinical Microbiology-Practicum III2
MIC 799Research: Masters Thesis6
Minimum elective credits 5
 
Total Credits 31
 
Core Curriculum
Plan B -- Non-Thesis Credits
MIC 500Orientation to Clinical Microbiology1
MLS 530Medical Laboratory Management and Education2
MIC 554Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenicity2
MIC 751Graduate Seminar2
MIC 753Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases2
MIC 755Advanced Immunology2
MIC 761Research Paper2
MIC 770Clinical Microbiology-Practicum I5
MIC 780Clinical Microbiology-Practicum II4
MIC 790Clinical Microbiology-Practicum III2
Minimum elective credits 9
 
Total Credits 33
 
Electives
Elective courses to complement the career goals of the student or to make up academic deficiencies will be agreed upon by the student and the student's advisory committee. Students may be required to take additional elective courses based on recommendations of their committee.
 
 
Credits
MIC516Microbial Genetics5
MIC520Virology3
MIC521Virology Lab2
MIC525Bacterial Physiology4
MIC526Food Microbiology4
MIC540Bioinformatics2
BIO 506Parasitology4
BIO 512Mycology3
BIO513Medical Mycology3
BIO535Molecular Biology3
BIO536Molecular Biology Laboratory1
BIO701Communication in theBiological Sciences4
CHM517Biochemistry I3
CHM518Biochemistry II3
MLS 525Molecular Pathology3
MLS530Medical Laboratory Management & Education2
HED 755Epidemiology and Public Health Issues3

MICROBIOLOGY CONCENTRATION
 
Admission to the microbiology concentration requires a minimum of one introductory microbiology course --Fundamentals of Microbiology (MIC 230 or equivalent). Students lacking an introductory microbiology course may be conditionally admitted to the concentration contingent on remediation of this prerequisite. This concentration requires completion of a research thesis (MIC 799, 2-6 credits) in an area of microbiology, passing an oral comprehensive exam and completion of 30 credits of graduate course work with at least 20 credits from the following list. The remaining credits are selected by the student and the advisory committee.
 
Credits
MIC506Immunology4
MIC507Pathogenic Bacteriology4
BIO506Parasitology4
BIO512Mycology4
BIO513Medical Mycology3
MIC516Microbial Genetics5
MIC 520Introductory Virology3
MIC521Virology Lab2
MIC525Bacterial Physiology5
MIC526Food Microbiology4
MIC527Industrial and Fermentation Microbiology3
MIC528Fermentation Microbiology Laboratory2
MIC534Aquatic Microbial Ecology3
BIO535Molecular Biology3
BIO 536Molecular Biology Laboratory1
MIC540Bioinformatics2
MIC554Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenicity2
MIC 714Advanced Genetics3
MIC721Directed Studies1-2
MIC730Biodegradation and Bioremediation2
MIC755Advanced Immunology2
MIC799Research: Master's Thesis1-6
 
Total Credits 30
 
NURSE ANESTHESIA CONCENTRATION
 
This concentration is jointly offered by the Department of Biology and Franciscan Skemp Healthcare, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Students simultaneously complete requirements for the master of science degree in biology and educational requirements to become a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). Candidates for this concentration must apply separately and be accepted into the Franciscan Skemp Healthcare School of Anesthesia. This concentration requires (1) passing an oral comprehensive exam and (2) completion of the core curriculum of 30 credits.
 
CRNA Core Curriculum Credits
BIO501Human Gross Anatomy7
BIO524Endocrinology3
BIO713Physiology of Drug Action2
BIO715Pathophysiology I3
BIO717Pathophysiology II3
BIO718Advanced HumanPhysiology I4
BIO719Advanced Human Physiology II4
CHM530Chemistry in Health Sciences4
 
Total Credits 30
 
PHYSIOLOGY CONCENTRATION
 
This concentration requires (1) completion of a research thesis in an area of animal physiology, (2) passing an oral comprehensive exam, and (3) completion of 30 credits with at least 15 credits from the following list; remaining credits are to be selected by the student and the advisory committee.
 
Credits
BIO517Animal Physiology4
BIO524Endocrinology3
BIO528Animal Metabolism, Nutrition and Disease3
BIO532Biology of Cancer2
BIO535Molecular Biology3
BIO536Molecular Biology Laboratory1
BIO565Neurophysiology4
BIO718Advanced Human Physiology I4
BIO719Advance Human Physiology II4
BIO799Research: Master's Thesis1-6
 
Total Credits 30
 
With the approval of the student's advisory committee, other courses may be substituted for those listed.

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
 
 
The College of Business Administration is an institution of higher education dedicated to the personal and professional development of its students. The college's programs provide our students with an integrated business education at the undergraduate and masters' levels that prepares them for successful professional careers. Our graduates will be prepared to be effective problem solvers, ethical decision-makers, and life-long learners in a dynamic, diverse world
environment.
The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers a program of evening and online courses in business leading to the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. The program, which is accredited by AACSB International -- The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, is designed for qualified students, regardless of area of undergraduate preparation.
The overall objective of the program is to prepare graduates for positions of leadership in business and public administration. The program has been designed to develop the student's critical, analytical, problem solving and decision-making capabilities and to provide basic knowledge useful in the solution of management problems.
More information can be obtained at the Web site: www.uwlax.edu/ba
 
ADMISSION
Applicants for admission to the program must apply through the University Admissions Office. In order to be admitted in good standing, applicants must meet the University requirements including a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.85 (or 3.00 for the last half of undergraduate work) on a 4.00 scale and demonstrate the ability to successfully complete the MBA program. Performance on the GMAT and prior academic work will be used as indicators of ability. International students are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit their scores for evaluation. Applicants who meet the minimum standards may be denied admission because of enrollment limitations.

  

THE PROGRAM

 
Foundation
The MBA program has two phases for qualified applicants with foundation course deficiencies. Such applicants will be admitted to the program while they complete their remaining foundation course work.
Foundation Courses
ECO 110 and ECO 120
or
ECO 703 and ECO 704
ACC 221 and ACC 222
or
ACC 703 and ACC 704
MKT 309 or MKT 700
FIN 355 or FIN 701
MGT 393 or MGT 702
MGT 308 or MGT 703
MGT 205
I-S 220
MTH 205
(A minimum grade of "C" is required in all foundation courses completed pre- or post-baccalaureate.)
 
Students completing foundation courses must achieve a minimum grade point average of 3.00. Students who earn less than a "C" grade in any foundation course will be dropped from the program.
Some courses are offered via the Internet in an accelerated format that may allow completion of the foundation program in one calendar year.
Credit by exam (test out) is available for several foundation courses. Information should be obtained from the program director.
 
MBA
Qualified applicants who have completed at least 80% of the foundation courses are admitted to the graduate degree requirement phase. (Remaining foundation courses must be completed within the first two semesters of graduate study.) Course requirements for the degree are listed below:
 
Masters Degree Requirements:
Credits
BUS730Decision Framing and Decision Making in Complex Environments3
BUS731Decision Making in Complex Environments3
BUS735Business Decision-Making Methodology and Research4
BUS750Managing in an Environmentally and Socially Conscious World3
BUS755Managing in a Changing Technological Environment3
BUS760Managing in a Global Environment4
BUS790Assessment1
Electives*9
Minimum Credits  30
 
 
*Elective credits must be selected from course work approved by the MBA Program Director. Several options are available for students to complete the elective credit requirement. These options include:
 
--MBA elective course work from UW-La Crosse or other institutions with the approval of the MBA program director.
--Directed Internship Experience (maximum 6 credits)
--Directed Independent Study (maximum 3 credits)
--Research: Masters Thesis (maximum 6 credits)
 
All students must complete at least six elective credits at the 700 level.
 
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
A 3.00 grade point average in courses counting toward the MBA is required for graduation. Students must be able to achieve this grade point average in, at most, 36 credits or they will be dropped from the program. A student earning a "D" or "F" in a graduate level course, whether it has been taken on this campus or at another university, will be dropped from the program. A maximum of six credits of "C" may be applied to the MBA.
 
RESTRICTIONS
Enrollment in MBA courses is restricted to graduate students in the MBA program, unless given special permission by the program director. Graduate students from other programs could be permitted to take, at most, six credits of 500/600/700 level MBA courses.

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COLLEGE STUDENT DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
 
The master's program in College Student Development and Administration (CSDA) at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse is a graduate program that focuses on educating and training professionals to work in post-secondary institutions. The CSDA program utilizes a student development emphasis as the theoretical basis of the program. The objective of developing an appropriate theoretical background, complemented with practical work experience, is designed to facilitate entry into a variety of college student development and administration positions and to provide current and relevant information through the use of full-time practicing professionals who instruct the program. Some of the many areas in which students may choose to specialize their preparations or to seek positions upon graduation include: Residence Life/Housing, Admissions/Registration, Financial Aid, Academic Skills, Counseling/Testing, Placement/Career Advising, Student Development, Student Life, Student Activities/Programs/Centers, or similar support services.
 
ADMISSION
 
Admission to graduate study does not constitute admission to the College Student Development and Administration program. Procedures for admission to the program are as follows:
1. Completion of the CSDA Program Application and Personal Data Sheet.
2. Submission of three letters of recommendation from recent supervisors and/or undergraduate advisers
or
Submission of placement papers
(if available.)
3. Submission of a personal writing
sample on a current issue in higher education.
4. An interview either on campus or by telephone with the Admissions Committee.
Graduate students in the CSDA program have the following options from which to choose to complete their course of study: thesis, seminar paper, or comprehensive examination.
 
Enrollment in CSDA courses is restricted to graduate students in the CSDA program, unless given special permission by the program director.
 
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
(35--38 credits)
Credits
SDA702Student Development Theory I4
SDA703Advising and Helping Relationships2
SDA705Higher Education and the Student Personnel Function3
SDA708Multicultural Groups, Special Populations and
Environmental Interactions 3
SDA710Administration in Higher Education2
SDA715Student Development Theory II3
SDA730Legal Issues in Student Affairs2
SDA740Organization Theory and Behavior3
SDA761Research and Evaluation*3-4*
SDA775Student Affairs Administrative Practicum.2**
SDA776Student Affairs Programming Practicum.2**
SDA781College Student Development and Administration Internship3**
SDA790Capstone Seminar2
SDA799Research: Master's Thesis 4 or Electives (agreed upon by student & adviser) 3-4
Total Required Credits  35-38
 
 
* Three credits for those students who choose the thesis or comprehensive examination option; four credits for those students who choose the seminar paper.
 
**Students with prior/current experience in higher education may have one required experience waived (775, 776, or 781) contingent upon submitting required documentation and receiving program director's approval.

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EDUCATION -- PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
 
The Master of Education -- Professional Development (ME-PD) program in the School of Education offers graduate degrees in two areas: 1) professional development, which is designed for graduate students who want to develop education-related competencies specifically for job needs and professional growth, and 2) initial certification, which is designed for students who wish to obtain a license to teach in early childhood, elementary, middle level, and secondary classrooms. Graduate students in the ME-PD program must complete a culminating project chosen from the following options: thesis, seminar paper, or comprehensive examination.
 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
 
The ME-PD non-certification option has the flexibility to meet the individual, intellectual needs and professional goals of many graduates with baccalaureate degrees. Certified teachers seeking to meet desired professional advancement goals or students wishing to pursue a master's degree for other career goals may, with the assistance of an adviser, plan individualized programs of study in coordination with a prescribed set of core courses totaling 12 graduate credits (listed below). Students typically choose two to three areas of concentration and have the option of creating an interdisciplinary program of study. Each program must contain a minimum of either a) 30 graduate semester hours, including at least 15 credits at the 700-level and completion of a seminar/thesis paper or b) 36 graduate semester hours, including at least 18 credits at the 700-level and completion of the comprehensive examination.
 
Required Core
(12 credits)
Credits
C-I 630 Understanding Diverse Learners 3
or
EFN705Human Relations in School and Society3
C-I752Principles & Problems of Curriculum Development3
EFN701The Teacher and the Educational Community3
EFN760Theory and Practice in Educational Research3
 
In addition to above courses, each student must develop a study plan before obtaining 12 graduate credits. This plan includes the following criteria and must be personally presented to the ME-PD Board of Review for final approval:
 
1. Written statement of professional goals and objectives.
2. List of courses to be completed that address the goals and objectives.
3. Indicate selection of seminar paper/thesis or comprehensive examination option.
4. Have student's graduate faculty adviser's signature indicating approval.
 

  
INITIAL CERTIFICATION

 
The ME-PD degree leading to initial certification is for students possessing a baccalaureate degree who wish to obtain licensure to teach early childhood through middle childhood (birth to age 11), middle childhood through early adolescence (ages 6-12/13), early adolescence though adolescence (ages 10-21) or early childhood through adolescence (ages birth-21) while simultaneously earning a master's degree. Students may, with the assistance of an adviser, plan graduate programs that meet licensure requirements in certifiable major and minor areas.
Admission to the ME-PD initial certification program is competitive; students meeting the following requirements are not guaranteed admission into the program. Successful applicants are usually required to begin their programs during the fall semester. Applications are accepted between January 1 and March 1. Minimum requirements for admissioninclude:
 
1. Have earned and maintained a 3.00 cumulative grade point average in all college course work and a 3.00 or better in any major and/or minor in which certification is sought.
2. Have earned passing scores on the
Pre-Professional Skills Test (Reading -- 175, Mathematics -- 173, Writing -- 174). These scores must be submitted to the School of Education directly through the PPST examination center.
3. Complete an application for admission to the professional program in teacher education.
4. Submit a 300-500 word personal statement per School of Education guidelines.
5. Submit at least one (1) letter of recommendation from someone who can best address your potential as a future teacher.
6. Complete an application for admission to Graduate Studies at UW-La Crosse.
 
 
LEARNING COMMUNITY
 
The ME-PD Learning Community option, designed for school professionals or educators, enables students to develop values and standards for successful teaching and learning while weaving research and reflection into a continuous process that fosters the highest academic application. During the first year of the program, participants develop learning standards focused on the contemporary needs of elementary and secondary classrooms. During the second year, growth/ improvement plans will be written for each of these standards. This program is offered through a partnership with the School of Education, Office of Continuing Education and Extension, and Learning Quest, Inc. This unique program is offered during the academic year beginning each fall semester. Students come together as a community cohort one weekend each month for two years (summers excluded). This integrated approach to learning is made up of 30 credits that equal 480 hours of weekend courses and time within one's classroom/ school. Students complete the following four semester spiraled curriculum as well as a graduate capstone project, which serves as their culminating activity:
 
Learning Community:
Credits
Year 1 -- Semester I
C-I752Principles and Problems for Curriculum Development3
EFN715Issues and Trends in Education3
EFN750Guided Learning3
 
Year 1 -- Semester II
C-I590Teaching Thinking Skills3
C-I751Teacher Inquiry: Assessing Classroom Practices3
EFN630Understanding Diverse Learners2
 
Year 2 -- Semester I
EDM602Instructional Technology3
EFN750Guided Learning2
EFN760Theory & Practice in Educational Research3
 
Year 2 -- Semester II
SPE 525 Psychological Principles of Teaching Children with
Learning & Behavioral Problems 3
C-I761Seminar Paper2
EFN750Guided Learning2
 

LIBRARY MEDIA
 
This option is designed for students possessing a baccalaureate teaching degree who wish to obtain licensure in Library Media. Courses are offered evenings, weekends and summer sessions. Students who begin in the fall semester can complete initial certification requirements in two semesters and summer school.

 

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EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE -- SPORT ADMINISTRATION
 
 
The sport administration program prepares professionals for managerial positions in the sport industry such as athletics, sports/fitness centers, professional sports, sport/athletic equipment merchandising, and intramural/recreational sports. Students may select a thesis (36 credits) or non-thesis option (36 credits). Students choosing the non-thesis option must successfully apply for and complete comprehensive written exams in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science.
 
The following prerequisites must be
met for entry into this Master of Science program:
1. A physical education/kinesiology, sport/exercise science, or sport administration/management degree from an accredited four-year institution.
or
2. Documented course work in:
--human anatomy (3 credits)
--human physiology (3 credits)
 
Category A -- Research
Thesis Option (12 credits)
Required Courses: Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
EFN735Interpretation of Statistical Data3
ESS799Research: Master's Thesis6
 
Non-thesis Option (6 credits)
Required Courses: Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
EFN735Interpretation of Statistical Data3
or
ESS 752 Assessment of Physical Education and Athletics 3
Written Comprehensive Exam
 
 
Category B -- Core Requirements
(24 credits) Credits
ESS545Planning Facilities in Physical Activity and Sport3
ESS702Sport Administration3
ESS738Financial Management for Sport Programs3
ESS739Current Issues in Sport Law3
ESS754Sport Marketing3
ESS788Internship in Sport Administration6
 
Select one of the following three courses:
 
ESS749Psychological Aspects of Sport3
ESS760Problems in Athletics3
ESS766Sports in American Culture3
 
Category C -- Electives
(non-thesis option only -- 6 credits)
Elective credits must be related to the field of sport administration or teaching. All electives must be approved by the program director or adviser prior to course enrollment.
 
Up to three credits of ESS 560, Clinical Forum, will count toward this option.
 

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EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE -- PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING
 
 
The physical education teaching program is designed as a practitioner-oriented program for physical education teaching professionals seeking additional qualifications and expertise in areas such as teaching methods and styles, new and innovative curricular design, analysis of effective teaching, and supervision. Students may also choose to complete one of the following emphases as part of their program electives: 1) adventure/outdoor pursuits; 2) special populations; or 3) health as a lifestyle. Students must select either the thesis option (32 credits) or non-thesis option (32 credits). Students choosing the non-thesis option must successfully apply for and complete comprehensive written exams in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science. The physical education teaching program does not result in a K-12 teaching certificate. Additional course work may be required based on previously completed undergraduate course work.
 
Prerequisites or equivalents are:
1. Undergraduate major/minor in physical education and/or sport science/management from an accredited four-year institution.
2. Documented course work in the following areas:
-- anatomy/physiology
-- measurement and evaluation in physical education
-- adapted physical education
-- motor development/behavior/child development
 
Category A -- Research
(6-12 credits)
Thesis Option (12 credits)
Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
EFN735Interpretation of Statistical Data3
ESS799Thesis6
 
 
Non-Thesis Option
(6-9 credits)
Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
ESS736Critical Analysis3
(special populations only)
ESS 752 Assessment in Physical Education and Athletics 3
Written comprehensive examination
 
 
Category B -- Core Requirements
(10 credits)
Credits
ESS737Curriculum Design in Physical Education3
ESS759Analysis and Supervision of Physical Education3
ESS771Current Issues in Physical Education2
ESS725Diversity in the Physical Activity Setting2
 
 
Category C -- Electives
(Thesis option -- 10 credits)
(Non-Thesis option -- 16 elective credits)
 
Elective courses must be related to the field of teaching. A student may select one of the concentrations or a variety of courses offered in exercise and sport science, health education, and educational studies departments. All electives must be pre-approved by the program director. Up to six (6) credits of ESS 560, Clinical Forum, will count toward this category.
 
CONCENTRATION OPTIONS
 
Adventure/Outdoor Pursuits:
(16 credits)
Credits
ESS745Pedagogy of Outdoor Physical Education3
ESS765Adventure Theory3
ESS777Seminar in Adventure/Research2
ESS778Practicum in Adventure/Outdoor Pursuits2
ElectivesNon-Thesis Option6
 
Special Populations:
(16 credits)
Credits
ESS530Cause and Effect4
ESS765Adventure Theory3
ESS787Clinical Internship3
ESS792Seminar: Special Physical Education3
ElectivesNon-Thesis Option3
 
Health as a Lifestyle:
(16 credits)
Credits
SHE705Essentials of Health and Wellness4
SHE715Health Education Curriculum and Pedagogy3
SHE720Youth and Adolescent Issues3
ElectivesNon-Thesis Option6
 
ATHLETIC TRAINING CONCENTRATION
The Graduate Athletic Training Concentration provides advanced study for Certified Athletic Trainer. The concentration provides students the opportunity to expand their knowledge and further develop their athletic training skills. The concentration can be completed by
graduate students meeting the following criteria:
 
-- unconditional admission to a UW-L graduate program
-- successfully passed the National Athletic Trainers' Association - Board of Certification Examination
 
Graduates who have completed the concentration are prepared to:
 
-- conduct applied research in high school, university and clinical settings
-- pursue advanced scholarly activities in athletic training
-- incorporate scientific knowledge into professional practice
 
Graduates may be employed in:
-- colleges and universities
-- sports medicine centers
-- high schools
-- hospital, rehabilitation and clinical settings
-- industrial and corporate settings
-- professional sports
 
Concentration requirements:
Credits
ESS730Athletic Activity Injury/ Illness Evaluation3
ESS731Rehabilitation of Athletic Musculoskeletal3
ESS732Advanced Athletic Activity Injury Management3
ESS733Advanced Athletic Training Clinical4
ESS773Physical Education in
Higher Education3
 
TOTAL CREDITS 16
 

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EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE -- HUMAN PERFORMANCE

 
The Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Science-Human Performance is a multi-disciplinary program of advanced study designed to prepare graduates for a career in one of the following areas: 1) fitness; 2) strength and conditioning; or 3) research (exercise physiology or biomechanics). Students will select one of these emphasis areas upon entry to the degree program. A concentration in Athletic Training is also available with the Human Performance program option.
 
Application deadline is February 1 of each year for fall and summer semesters, October 1 for spring semester.
 
Graduate Preparation Goals:
-- serve as fitness professional in health club, fitness facility or corporate fitness facility
-- serve as head or assistant strength and conditioning coach for DI, DII or DIII university sports or professional and semi-professional sports
-- pursue a doctoral degree and a career as an exercise scientist (teaching and research at the university level)
 
* Other courses may be selected with the consent of the program director.
** Total combined credits for all readings classes may be no greater than three.
 
FITNESS EMPHASIS
(Thesis or Non Thesis):
At least one-half of the credits must be earned at the 700 level. Students choosing the non-thesis option must successfully complete written comprehensive examinations at the end of the program.
 
Prerequisite Courses (or equivalent) and Requirements for Admission:
Credits
GRE Scores
ESS205Human Anatomy3
ESS206Human Physiology3
ESS302Physiology of Exercise2
ESS303Biomechanics2
 
Course Requirements:
 
Category A --Research
Thesis Option (12 credits)
Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
EFN735Interpretation of Statistical Data3
ESS799Research: Master's
Thesis 6
 
Non-Thesis Option (6 credits)
Credits
EFN 730 Introduction to Research 3
and
EFN 735 Interpretation of Statistical Data 3
or
ESS 752 Assessment of Physical Education and Athletics 3
 
Category B -- Core Requirements
(13-15 credits)
Credits
ESS749Psychological Aspects of Sport3
ESS750Mechanics and Analysis of Movement3
ESS751Advanced Biomechanics3
ESS761Laboratory Techniques in Human Performance -- Biomechanics2
ESS762Laboratory Techniques in Human Performance -- Exercise Physiology3
ESS763Laboratory Techniques in Human Performance -- Motor Learning2
ESS768Psychomotor Bases of Skilled Performance3
ESS770Physiology of Activity3
 
Category C -- Electives*
Thesis Option (7-9 credits)
Non-Thesis Option (13-15 credits)
Credits
ESS545Planning Facilities in Physical Activity and Sport3
ESS560Clinical Forum Appropriate Topics3
ESS680Injury Prevention, Management andRehabilitation 2
ESS730Athletic Activity Injury/Illness Evaluation3
ESS731Rehabilitation of Athletic Musculoskeletal3
ESS732Advanced AthleticActivity Injury Management3
ESS733Advanced AthleticTraining Clinical2
(maximum of 4)
ESS739Current Issues in Sport Law3
ESS742Perceptual Motor Development of Children3
ESS766Sports in America Culture3
ESS769Application of Muscle Physiology to Strength/ Power Training3
ESS780Organization and Administration of Adult Fitness and Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs3
ESS784Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology3
ESS789Internship: Human Performance3
**ESS794Readings in Sports Psychology1-3
ESS795Independent Study
credits) 1-3
maximum of 6)
**ESS796Readings in Biomechanics1-3
**ESS797Readings in Exercise Physiology1-3
**ESS798Readings in Motor Learning1-3
BIO524Endocrinology3
BIO535Molecular Biology3
BIO565Principles of Neurobiology3
BIO718Advanced Human Physiology I 4
BIO719Advanced Human Physiology II4
 
STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING EMPHASIS
(Non Thesis only):
 
Prerequisite Courses (or equivalent) and Requirements for Admission:
Credits
GRE Scores
ESS205Human Anatomy3
ESS206Human Physiology3
ESS302Physiology of Exercise2
ESS303Biomechanics2
ESS368Strength Training Theory and Techniques2
Two Letters of Recommendation
CSCS Preferred
 
Course Requirements:
Category A --Research (6 credits)
Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
ESS752Assessment of Physical Education & Athletics3
 
Category B --Core Requirements (24 credits)
Credits
ESS545Planning Facilities in Physical Activity and Sport3
ESS702Sport Administration3
ESS738Financial Management for Sport Programs3
ESS749Psychological Aspects of Sport3
ESS750Mechanics and Analysis of Movement3
ESS769Application of MusclePhysiology to Strength/Power Training3
ESS770Physiology of Activity3
ESS789Internship: HumanPerformance3
 
Category C --Electives
(2 credits minimum)
Credits
ESS739Current Issues in Sport Law3
ESS754Sport Marketing3
ESS760Problems in Athletics3
ESS766Sports in American Culture3
ESS768Psychomotor Bases of Skilled Performance3
ESS795Independent Study1-3
(maximum of 6)
RESEARCH EMPHASIS
(Thesis only):
 
EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
 
Prerequisite Courses (or equivalent) and Requirements for Admission:
Credits
GRE Scores
ESS205Human Anatomy3
ESS206Human Physiology3
ESS302Physiology of Exercise2
ESS303Biomechanics2
BIO315Cell Biology4
CHM103General Chemistry I5
CHM104General Chemistry II5
CHM303Organic Chemistry Theory I3
Two Letters of Recommendation
Graduate Faculty (UW-L) Letter of Intent for Mentorship
 
Course Requirements (39 credits)
 
Category A -- Research
(12 credits) Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
EFN735Interpretation of Statistical Data3
ESS799Research: Master's Thesis6
 
Category B -- Core Requirements (20 credits)
Credits
ESS762Lab Techniques in Human Performance - Exercise Physiology3
ESS769Application of Muscle Physiology to Strength/ Power Training3
ESS770Physiology of Activity3
*ESS789Internship: Human Performance3
(minimum of 120 hours)
BIO718Advanced HumanPhysiology I4
BIO719Advanced Human Physiology II4
 
*Internship must be in approved external research facility.
 
Category C -- Related Requirements (7 credits)
Credits
BIO524Endocrinology3
BIO535Molecular Biology3
BIO536Molecular BiologyLaboratory1
 
RESEARCH EMPHASIS
(Thesis only):
 
BIOMECHANICS
 
Prerequisite Courses (or equivalent) and Requirements for Admission:
Credits
GRE Scores
ESS205Human Anatomy3
ESS303Biomechanics2
CHM103General Chemistry I5
CHM104General Chemistry II5
MTH207Calculus I5
PHY103Fundamental Physics I4
PHY104Fundamental Physics II4
Two Letters of Recommendation
Graduate Faculty (UW-L) Letter of Intent for Mentorship
 
Course Requirements (40 credits)
 
Category A --Research
(12 credits) Credits
EFN730Introduction to Research3
EFN735Interpretation of Statistical Data3
ESS799Research: Master's Thesis6
 
Category B -- Core Requirements (17 credits) Credits
ESS560Clinical Forum Appropriate Topics3
ESS750Mechanics & Analysis of Movement3
ESS751Advanced Biomechanics3
ESS761Lab Techniques in Human Performance - Biomechanics2
*ESS789Internship: Human Performance3
(minimum of 120 hours)
ESS 796 Readings in Biomechanics 3
 
*Internship must be in approved external research facility.
 
 
Category C --Related Requirements (11 credits)
Credits
ESS763Lab Techniques in Human Performance -Motor Learning2
ESS768Psychomotor Bases of Skilled Performance3
ESS769Application of Muscle Physiology to Strength/Power Training3
BIO565Principles of Neurobiology3
 

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HEALTH EDUCATION AND HEALTH PROMOTION

 
Graduate programs leading to a master of science degree are available in two areas of concentration in health education:
 
(1) Community Health Education (non-thesis only) which is designed to prepare individuals for employment in community health agencies, and
 
(2) School Health Education (thesis and non-thesis options), which is designed to prepare certified public school personnel for teaching, administration, and/or curriculum coordination of school health programs.
 
For each program, students must complete individually prescribed undergraduate course work to meet prerequisite requirements. Graduate students from other programs are not allowed to enroll in health education graduate courses unless departmental approval has been given.
 
ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
The following requirements must be satisfied in order to be admitted into the master of science degree program in health education and health promotion.
I. Students must receive acceptance to graduate study in health education and health promotion from the Graduate Admissions Office. The letter of acceptance from the Graduate Admissions Office may include an evaluation of previous academic work including deficiencies and/or specific prerequisite program requirements.
II. Applicants must be granted unconditional admission to graduate study (a 2.85 GPA or above will satisfy grade point requirement), or must be admitted "on probation" to graduate study.
III. Students must complete deficiencies as determined by the health education and health promotion graduate faculty.
 
Note:
All deficiencies and/or special prerequisites must be satisfied before the student has accumulated 12 graduate credits. Students have the option of completing these requirements prior to attending the university or prior to the accumulation of 12 graduate credits.
 
 
Appeals of admission denied:
Any student denied admission into the master's program may request a program admission review. A written request for review must be submitted to the health education and health promotion department chair. This request will be forwarded to an appeals committee for the review of the admission status.
 
Note: Graduate credit will not be awarded for any course in which undergraduate credit was received. This applies to all graduate programs offered in the College of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Teacher Education.
 
COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION CONCENTRATION
 
Non-thesis Option (43 Credits)
Required Courses: Credits
CHE598Community Health Education Preceptorship5
HED703Health Education Foundations3
HED706Research Tools and Processes6
HED798Graduate Project in Health Education4
 
Required Credits 18
 
Each student will develop a program of study through advisement to meet individual needs and meet university requirements. The individualized program will include courses from each of the following core areas. A minimum of six credits will be taken in each area.
 
A. Administration and Program Development Core*
 
CHE 566, HED 577, 720, 790, ESS 780
 
B. Health Education Processes and Concepts Core*
 
HED 567, 701, 755, 770, SHE 560
 
C. Health Content and Skills Core*
 
CHE 541, 553, 565, HED 509, 539, 569, 572, 573, 574 586, 707.
 
Minimum Core Credits 18
Electives Minimum 7
 
* Special Requests (e.g.CHE/SHE 575, 595; HED 725; courses from other departments and campuses) may be approved for inclusion.
 
 
SCHOOL HEALTH EDUCATION CONCENTRATION
 
The master of science in school health education prepares professionals for positions in schools as licensed health education teachers and coordinators. Graduates gain an overview of the content areas of health and an in-depth understanding of behavior change, leadership styles and strategies, learning theories, instructional methods and materials, and curriculum design.
 
Graduates are prepared to:
-- provide leadership in establishing and maintaining a healthy school environment
-- understand public policy related to school health programs
-- demonstrate effective public relations and leadership methods
-- understand functions of community agencies
-- assist other teachers in upgrading skills and knowledge
-- evaluate the teaching-learning process to determine health needs and interests, students' progress, and school health education success
-- conduct research and interpret the results of health-related research
 
Graduates are employed in:
-- public and private schools
-- regional education agencies
-- state education agencies
-- public and private agencies
-- and/or pursue further graduate education
 
 
Thesis Option (32 Credits)
Required courses:
Research Core Credits
HED706Research Tools and Processes6
HED799Research: Master's Thesis3
Total Credits 9
 
Health Core**: Credits
SHE710Leadership in Health Education3
SHE715Health 3
SHE720Adolescent and Youth Health Issues3
Total Credits 9
 
Minimum Required
Credits **18 (22)
 
Elective Courses
With an adviser's approval, elective courses are selected to develop a health education emphasis (i.e., curriculum content, health as a lifestyle, administration, or adventure education). A maximum of twelve credits may be taken outside the Health Education and Health Promotion Department. Students who are seeking state health education certification can select elective courses to meet Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) requirements.
 
Minimum Elective
Credits **14 (10)
 
Non-thesis Option (32 Credits)
Required Courses:
Research Core Credits
HED706Research Tools and Processes3
HED798Graduate Project in Health Education3
 
Total Credits 6
 
Health Core**: Credits
SHE710Leadership in Health Education3
SHE715Health 3
SHE720Adolescent and Youth Health Issues3
 
Total Credits 9
 
Minimum Required
Credits **15 (19)
 
Elective Courses
With an adviser's approval, elective courses are selected to develop a health education emphasis (i.e., curriculum content, health as a lifestyle, administration, or adventure education). A maximum of twelve credits may be taken outside the Health Education and Health Promotion Department. Students who are seeking state health education certification can select elective courses to meet Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) requirements.
 
Minimum Elective
Credits **17 (13)
 
 
Adventure Emphasis (10 Credits)
ESS745Pedagogy -- Outdoor Education3
ESS765Adventure Education3
ESS777Seminar in Adventure/Outdoor Physical Education2
ESS778Practicum in Adventure Education2
Additional Electives
 
** Students who do not have an undergraduate degree in Health Education will also be required to test out of or take SHE 705, Essentials of Health and Wellness.
 
 

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MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION
 
The Master of Public Health in Community Health Education (MPH­CHE) prepares health and human service professionals to serve in various settings where community health education approaches are employed to improve health and well being. This practitioner-oriented program addresses behavioral theory, communication and motivational processes, community intervention strategies, and evaluation procedures for community health promotion and primary prevention. As a culminating experience, students complete a thesis or graduate project in health education." One of two options is selected by the candidate: Plan A, which includes a master's thesis, or Plan B, the non-thesis option. Each option requires the same core courses. Graduate students from other programs are not allowed to enroll in health education graduate courses unless departmental approval has been given.
The only degree of its kind in the UW System, the MPH-CHE is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health.
 
Graduates are prepared to:
-- assess individual and community health needs
-- plan effective health education and health promotion programs
-- implement and evaluate educational experiences
-- coordinate and manage the provisions of health education services
-- serve as resource people in health education
-- communicate health and health education needs, concerns, and resources
-- conduct health education and promotion research
-- apply research principles and strategies in health education
-- manage and supervise health education programs in various settings
 
Graduates are employed in:
-- public health agencies
-- volunteer and private agencies
-- hospitals and other health care settings
-- local, state, and national governmental agencies
-- business and industrial settings
 
 
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
1. Students must complete an "Application for Admission to Graduate Study" form and specific MPH-CHE admission materials to be returned to the Admissions Office by February 15. Following review of the admissions materials by the departmental review committee, a letter of decision will be sent to the applicant.
2. Cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of not less than 3.00 based on a minimum of 60 final semester credits or a cumulative post-baccalaureate GPA of not less than 3.00 based on not less than nine semester credits as determined by the graduate program director in the Department of Health Education and Health Promotion.
3. A minimum Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score of 1500 for the total general test scores for verbal, qualitative, and analytical measures is strongly recommended.
4. Three current (within one year) letters of recommendation on the forms provided.
5. One letter of application and intent which details your:
-- academic goals within the MPH program
-- professional goals
-- previous professional experiences
-- reasons for selecting an MPH degree program (vs. MS or other master's degree)
-- reasons for wanting to be a community health educator
-- special interests within the field of community health education
6. A minimum of one year of voluntary or salaried post-baccalaureate work experience in one or more health or social service settings is strongly recommended.
7. A departmental review committee will assess all submitted materials, to include an interview when necessary. It is important to note that one's acceptance or non-acceptance is based upon a comprehensive review of the above items, and is not based solely on any particular element.
 
Prerequisite competency areas: Chemistry (CHM 100 or 103), Biology (BIO 312-313 or ESS 205 and 206), Sociology (SOC 110 or 120 or 334), Health Statistics/ Research Design (CHE 350 or MTH 205), Community Health Education Foundations (CHE 240 or public health education experience), Epidemiology (CHE 340), Health related experience (one year, or CHE 498 -- 12 credits).
 
Plan A: Thesis Option (41 Credits)
Required Courses: Credits
CHE598Community Health Education Preceptorship5
HED701Contemporary Issues in Health Education3
HED703Health Education Foundations3
HED706Research Tools and Processes6
HED707Environmental Health3
HED720Program Assessment, Planning and Evaluationin Health Promotion3
HED755Epidemiology and Public Health Issues3
HED770Health Counseling3
HED790Public Health Administration and Organization3
HED799Research: Master's Thesis4
Electives 5
 
Total Credits 41
 
Plan B: Non-thesis Option
(45 Credits)
 
The Plan B option would include the 32 required course and preceptorship credits, along with HED 798, Graduate Project in Health Education, for three credits, plus 10 credits of electives. The elective credits provide a wide range of options in the areas of health education concepts and processes, program development, and skill development. These elective experiences would be established following discussions with the community health education graduate studies director in the Department of Health Education and Health Promotion.
 
 

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PHYSICAL THERAPY
 
Physical therapists play a critical role in the delivery of comprehensive health care in today's society. Upon completion of all curricular requirements, students are awarded a Master of Science degree in Physical Therapy (MSPT). The UW-La Crosse Physical Therapy department currently offers two levels of graduate education. The Level I (or entry-level) program prepares students to enter the profession of physical therapy. The Level II program is designed for students who are currently licensed as physical therapists and are seeking advanced training in clinical skills, clinical/academic teaching, or research.
 
The Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse is committed to educating entry-level Master's degree physical therapists who are prepared to meet the health care needs of western Wisconsin by providing services throughout the continuum of health care. Program graduates are prepared to assume leadership roles in the health care delivery system as well as community and professional organizations. Finally, graduates are ready to assume other professional roles: consultation, education, critical inquiry, administration, and direction and supervision of personnel.
 
 
LEVEL I GRADUATE PROGRAM
 
The Level I program in Physical Therapy is designed to train therapists who can enter the profession as generalists. Program graduates are able to competently evaluate patients/clients, critically analyze new information, solve complex patient problems and have developed the skills to be life-long learners.
 
Admission Criteria
The criteria for admission to the Level I program are:
1. An earned baccalaureate degree (or will earn a baccalaureate degree by the May following the February 1st application deadline). Pre-professional core courses must be completed by the February 1st application deadline. The required pre-professional core courses are:
 
Credits
General Biology 4
Human Anatomy/Physiology
at 300 level or equivalent 8
Chemistry 8
Physics 8
Algebra/Trigonometry or Calculus 3-5
Statistics 3-4
Psychology 6
 
2. A minimum grade point average of 3.2 for all undergraduate study
 
3. Evidence of two 20-hour periods of clinical experience supervised by a physical therapist
 
4. Complete application for admission to the Level I professional program in physical therapy. Applicants must also apply to UW-La Crosse for graduate admission.
 
Selection Process
A student's Level I program application must be received in the department office by February 1st to be considered for the next year's class of entering professional students. The professional program begins in the summer of each academic year. Students will receive notification of the selection committee's decision by April 15.
 
Admission to the Level I program is competitive. Each year 30 students are selected based on their undergraduate grade point average (which includes the pre-professional core requirements), their clinical experience, a writing sample (which is part of the application form) and their performance in interviews with members of the selection committee.
 
The top 70 Level I applicants, ranked by grade point average, will be invited for interviews by two review teams comprised of physical therapy faculty and practicing clinicians. The review teams will judge the applicants on the basis of the material in their application file and their performance in the interviews. Interview questions will be designed to assess the applicant's understanding of the physical therapy profession, leadership skills, communication skills, and self-perception.
 
Applicants should be aware that admission to the professional program is competitive and not all who apply can be accommodated. Exceptions may be made in order to achieve social and cultural diversity to which the University and UW System are committed.
 
Level I Program Overview
(97 - 105 credits)
The Level I graduate program in physical therapy is eight semesters (30 months) long with clinical experiences dispersed throughout. These experiences include three 8-week internships; two of the 8-week internships are scheduled during the last semester.
 
Upon completion of the first year of the Level I program, students must declare either a thesis option or advanced clinical skills option. Students will pursue advanced study in their selected area during the last 18 months of the program. Students electing the thesis option will not enroll in the third 8-week internship (P-T 776) but will remain on campus and continue enrollment in
P-T 799 in order to complete the thesis. Students declaring the advanced clinical skills option may pursue course work in either:
* Clinical biomechanics
* Neuromuscular rehabilitation
* Musculoskeletal - spine emphasis
* Sports physical therapy
 
Students in the program should expect to incur additional expenses for books, lab fees, housing and travel during clinical internships and field trips for course work.
 
 
Level I MSPT Professional Curriculum:
Students declare either a thesis or advanced clinical elective option during the spring semester of their first year in the program. Students in both options take similar course work until the fall semester of their second year.
 
Year I -- Summer Session Credits
P­T521Human Anatomy (10 weeks)7
P­T522Physiology3
P­T561Applied Anatomical Assessment3
Total 13
 
Year I -- Fall Semester Credits
P-T523Kinesiology and Biomechanics of Normal and Abnormal Movement3
P­T524Physiological Regulation of Exertion and Disease3
P­T525Neuroanatomy3
P­T531Basic Handling in Patient Care2
P­T532Physical Agents I3
P-T541Communication and Interpersonal Skills1
P-T549PT Practice1
P­T562Scientific and Clinical Foundation for Evaluation and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Conditions
2
P­T646Professional Ethics1
Total 19
 
Year I -- J-Term
P­T 571 Clinical Fieldwork I (ECF -2 weeks) 1
Total 1
 
Year I -- Spring Semester Credits
P­T526Pathophysiology2
P­T527Life Span Motor Development3
P­T533Cardiopulmonary --
Evaluation and Treatment 3
P­T534Physical Agents II3
P-T644Psychological & Social Issues of Disability2
P­T664Musculoskeletal Evaluation and Treatment: Upper Extremity3
P-T682Statistical Methods2
Total 18
 
Year II -- Summer Session Credits
P­T551Neural Basis of Movement I3
P­T672Clinical Fieldwork II (Rural care - 4 weeks)2
P­T681Research Methods3
P­T683Instrumentation2
Total 10
 
Thesis Option
 
Year II -- Fall Semester Credits
P­T563Musculoskeletal Evaluation and Treatment:Lower Extremity3
P­T642 Clinical Teaching1
P­T652Neural Basis of Movement II4
P­T665Musculoskeletal Evaluation and Treatment: Spine3
P­T799Research: Master's Thesis2
Total 13
 
Year II -- J-Term
P­T 673 Clinical Fieldwork III (Ortho - 4 weeks) 2
Total 2
 
Year II --Spring Semester Credits
P-T635Prosthetics1
P-T643Health Care Systems2
P­T645Advanced Seminar I1
P­T653Neural Basis of Movement III4
P­T748Practice Issues1
P­T799Research: Master's Thesis2
Total 11
 
Year III --Summer Session Credits
P­T 774 Clinical Fieldwork (Rehab - 8 weeks) 4
Total 4
 
Year III --Fall Semester Credits
P­T775Clinical Fieldwork V (Acute - 8 weeks)4
P-T799Research: Master's Thesis2
Total 6
 
Total Credits
Thesis Option 97
 
 
Advanced Clinical Elective Option
 
Year II -- Fall Semester Credits
P­T563Musculoskeletal Evaluation and Treatment: Lower Extremity3
P-T642Clinical Teaching1
P-T652Neural Basis of Movement II4
P-T665Musculoskeletal Evaluation and Treatment: Spine3
P-TPT Advanced Elective (692, 696 or 697)2-3
P-T699P-T Independent Study (required for neuro, sports, spine options)1-2
Total 13-16
 
Year II --J-Term Credits
P­T 673 Clinical Fieldwork III (Ortho - 4 weeks) 2
Total 2
 
Year II --Spring Semester
P-T635Prosthetics1
P-T643Health Care Systems2
P-T645Advanced Seminar I1
P­T653Neural Basis of Movement III (12 weeks)4
P-TPT Advanced Elective (690, 693, 698)3
P-T699PT Independent Study (required for neuro, sports, spine and biomechanics options)1-3
P-T748Practice Issues1
Total 12-14
 
Year III --Summer Session Credits
P­T 774 Clinical Fieldwork (Rehab -8 weeks) 4
Total 4
 
Year III --Fall Semester Credits
P­T775Clinical Fieldwork V (Acute - 8 weeks)4
P-T776Clinical Fieldwork VI (Specialty - 8 weeks)4
Total 8
 
Total Credits Advanced
Clinical Elective Option 99-105
 
* Clinical Biomechanics Research Elective --
99 total credits
(2 cr. P-T 696 in fall and 2 cr. P-T
699 in spring)
 
* Muscuoloskeletal (Spine Emphasis) Advanced Clinical Elective --
101 total credits
(2 cr. P-T 699 in fall, 1 cr. P-T 699
and 3 cr. P-T 690 in spring)
 
* Neuromuscular Rehabilitation Advanced Clinical Elective --
103 total credits
(1 cr. P-T 699 and 3 cr. P-T 697 in fall,
1 cr. P-T 699 and 3 cr. P-T 698 in spring)
 
* Sports Physical Therapy Advanced Clinical Elective --
105 total credits
(2 cr. P-T 699 and 3 cr. P-T 692 in fall,
2 cr. P-T 699 and 3 cr. P-T 693 in spring)
 
Clinical Internships
The UW-L P-T program has established clinical affiliations and internships in communities throughout Wisconsin and the United States. Students will pay tuition while on clinical internships. The remaining expenses -- such as travel, room, and meals will vary depending on the specific site.
 
Degree
Master of Science degree in Physical Therapy (MSPT) will be awarded after successful completion of the curriculum.
Grades below a "C" earned in any required physical therapy course are unsatisfactory and cannot be used toward a major in physical therapy. Students not meeting this requirement will be asked to withdraw from the program. In addition, all students in the professional PT program must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.00 (see page 20 of the graduate catalog).
 
LEVEL II GRADUATE PROGRAM
The purpose of the Level II graduate program in Physical Therapy is to provide advanced training to licensed physical therapists who currently possess an entry-level baccalaureate degree in physical therapy. Students may pursue study in the following areas: advanced clinical skills, clinical/academic teaching, and clinical research.
 
Admission Criteria
The criteria for admission into the Level II program is as follows:
1. An entry-level degree in physical therapy.
2. A license to practice physical therapy and be eligible for licensure in the state of Wisconsin.
3. Clinical experience as a physical therapist (a minimum of two years is highly recommended for acceptance).
 
Selection Process
Applicants must submit a completed Level II application packet to the UW-L PT admissions committee with a curriculum vita by March 1. Applicants must also make formal application to the Office of Graduate Studies at UW-La Crosse.
The PT admissions committee will select candidates to interview. Interviews will be scheduled around April 1st of each year with three faculty members interviewing each candidate. Potential students will be notified of their acceptance status no later than May 1st.
 
Level II Program Overview
(35 credits)
The Level II graduate program in Physical Therapy is a 35-credit program. The majority of the courses taken by Level II students will be shared with Level I students. Level II students will have additional requirements in these courses.
 
Curriculum Options
Level II graduate students must select one of the following curriculum options:
 
Option A, Clinical Specialization
Students choosing Option A must complete a graduate project which would demonstrate competencies gained throughout the 35-credit course of study.
 
Option B, Clinical Research
Students choosing Option B must complete a thesis as part of the 35-credit curriculum.
 
Curriculum Committee
An entering Level II student must select a full-time PT graduate faculty member to serve as his/her major adviser. In addition the student must select two additional PT graduate faculty members who, along with the major adviser, will comprise the student's curriculum committee. The student's curriculum committee will guide the student in developing an individualized curriculum plan. The second member of the committee must also be a full-time PT faculty member while the third committee member may be a full- or part-time PT faculty member, or an adjunct faculty member.
 
Individualized Curriculum Plan
The curriculum plan should clearly state the student's clinical or research focus and should identify the student's goals related to each course listed in the plan. The curriculum plan should be developed prior to commencing course work. The plan ensures that the student and the advisers are in clear agreement about the student's program of study. The individualized curriculum plan must meet the following guidelines:
1. Core of research courses totaling at least 10 credits.
2. Core of basic science courses totaling at least 3 credits.
3. Combination of clinical and/or educational courses offered from within or outside the department comprising the remaining credits. The total number of credits in this category will vary depending on the number of credits taken in the first two categories and the student's selection of Option A or Option B.
4. Outline the expected competencies and evaluation format for each course.
 
Summary of Course Work for the Level II Graduate Program in Physical Therapy
All graduate students in the Level II graduate program in physical therapy must select one of the following curriculum options:
 
Plan A -- Clinical Specialization Credits
Core Research Courses 9-10
Core Basic Science Courses 3-7
Elective Courses 15-19
Graduate Project 3
Total 35
 
Plan B -- Clinical Research
Credits
Core Research Courses 9-10
Core Basic Science Courses 3-7
Elective Courses 12-16
Master's Thesis 6
Total 35
 
Level II Graduate Curriculum Overview:
 
Basic Research Courses
Credits
P­T681Research Methods3
P­T781Scientific Inquiry2
P­T783Level II Instrumentation2
MTH505Statistical Methods3
or
P-T 682 Statistical Methods 2
Total 9-10
 
Basic Science Courses
Credits
BIO715Pathophysiology I3
BIO717Pathophysiology II3
P­T721Level II Human Anatomy7
P­T723Level II Biomechanics3
P­T725Level II Neuroanatomy3
P­T726Level II Pathophysiology2
Total 3-7
Clinical Science Electives
Suggested courses to complete this category include:
Credits
P-T641Communication and Interpersonal Skills1
P-T642Clinical Teaching1
P-T645Advanced Seminar I1
P-T646Professional Ethics1
P-T699Independent Study1-6
P-T748Practice Issues1
P-T762Level II Scientific and Clinical Foundation for Evaluation and Treatment2
P-T763Level II Musculoskeletal Evaluation and Treatment: Lower Extremity3
P-T764Level II Musculoskeletal Evaluation and Treatment: Upper Extremity3
P-T765Level II Musculokeletal Evaluation and Treatment: Spine3
P-T790Level II Clinical Skills Orthopedics I3
P-T792Level II Clinical Skills: Sports Physical Therapy I3
P-T793Level II Clinical Skills: Sports Physical Therapy II3
P-T796Level II Biomechanics Research Emphasis2
P-T797Level II Neuro Elective I3
P-T798Level II Neuro Elective II3
 
Note:
Other graduate courses from outside the department can be taken with the approval of the student's curriculum committee. Students electing the clinical specialization option may take a total of 12 credits outside of the department, while students electing the thesis option may take a total of nine credits outside of the department.
 
Degree
A Master of Science in Physical Therapy (MSPT) will be awarded after successful completion of the Level II academic program.
 
Graduate Assistantships
Graduate assistantships will be available for Level II students and will depend upon funding levels; application for a graduate assistantship is a separate process from the Level II application process.
 

 

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READING

 

The graduate program in reading is designed for classroom teachers seeking greater expertise in the teaching of reading or wishing to qualify for reading teacher, reading specialist, or reading coordinator positions. Certification (or certifiability) to teach at either the elementary, middle, or secondary level is required for entry into the program. To complete degree requirements, students must elect one of the following program options:
 
A. Thesis Option -- 30 semester credits including completion of a Master's Thesis (RDG 799, Master's Thesis)
B. Seminar Paper -- 30 semester credits including completion of a Seminar Paper (RDG 761, Seminar Paper)
C. Comprehensive Examination -- 36 semester credits and successful
completion of a three-hour compre-hensive examination.
 
At least one-half of all credits (Options A­C) must be earned in 700-level courses. Candidates selecting the thesis or seminar paper option must begin work on their papers with an adviser at least two terms prior to the term in which they expect to graduate. Candidates selecting the 36-credit option should schedule their comprehensive examination with the program director for the term in which they expect to graduate.
 
CONCENTRATIONS
 
Three instructional emphases or concentrations are available in the graduate reading program. Concentration I meets the requirements for Wisconsin's DPI 316 Reading Teacher license; Concentration II meets the requirements for Wisconsin's DPI 317 Reading Specialist license; and Concentration III is designed for classroom teachers uninterested in 316/317 licensure but desiring greater expertise in developing literacy skills. All candidates for licensure (Concentrations I and II) must meet designated course requirements and must have two years of classroom teaching experience. Since classroom teaching experience can be interpreted in various ways, the program director should be consulted if there are any questions.
 
 
Concentration I -- Reading Teacher
 
Required Courses Credits
(listed in preferred sequence)
RDG741Reading in the Elementary School3
* RDG528Reading in the Content Areas3
* EDM510Children's Literature3
or
* EDM 515 Adolescent Literature 3
or
EDM773Current Trends in Literature for Children and Young Adults3
RDG730Assessment and Instruction of Students with Reading Difficulties3
RDG733Advanced Assessment and Evaluation of Reading Difficulties3
* RDG747Reading Practicum3
RDG762Reading Theory and Research3
RDG761Seminar Paper
(not required for Plan A or C) 2
or
RDG 799 Master's Thesis
(not required for Plan B or C) 3-6
 
Concentration II --Reading Specialist
 
Required Courses Credits
(listed in preferred sequence)
RDG741Reading in the Elementary School3
* RDG528Reading in the Content Areas3
* EDM510Children's Literature3
or
* EDM 515 Adolescent Literature 3
or
EDM773Current Trends in Literature for Children and Young Adults3
RDG730Assessment and Instruction of Students with Reading Difficulties3
RDG733Advanced Assessment and Evaluation of Reading Difficulties3
RDG739Guiding and Directing the K-12 Reading Program3
* RDG747Reading Practicum3
RDG762Reading Theory and Research3
RDG735Developing Content Area Reading Programs3
RDG781Educational Supervision3
RDG761Seminar Paper
(not required for Plan A or C) 2
or
RDG 799 Master's Thesis
(not required for Plan B or C) 3-6
 
Concentration III -- Classroom Teacher Emphasis
 
Required Courses Credits
(listed in preferred sequence)
RDG741Reading in the Elementary School3
* RDG528Reading in the Content Areas3
* RDG520Emergent Literacy3
or
RDG710Seminar: Reading and Language Arts in the Middle School3
EDM773Current Trends in Literature for Children and Young Adults3
RDG735Developing Content Reading Programs3
RDG730Assessment and Instruction of Students with Reading Difficulties3
* RDG747Reading Practicum3
RDG762Reading Theory and Research3
RDG761Seminar Paper
(not required for Plan A or C) 2
or
RDG 799 Master's Thesis
(not required for Plan B or C) 3-6
 
*May be waived if comparable courses were taken at the undergraduate level.
 
 
ELECTIVES
 
Elective credits to meet the 30 credit (plans A and B) or 36 credit (plan C) minimums must be approved by the program director. Elective credits are to be taken from courses that focus on reading/writing relationships, language arts instruction, writing instruction, use of computers in reading/language arts instruction and curriculum development. Examples are:
 
C-I752Principles and Problems of Curriculum Development3
C-I739Research and Practice in Improving Written Expression 3
C-I406/606Teaching Basic Writing Skills1
C-I407/607Uses of Computers and Software in Middle and Secondary School Writing3
C-I746Seminar in Teaching English Language Arts1-3
RDG745Early Reading Empowerment I3
RDG746Early Reading Empowerment II3
RDG765Factors Related to Reading Performance2-3
RDG450/650Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum: Learning to Learn from Text3
RDG770Symposium in Reading Education1-3
 
For description of C-I courses, see Curriculum and Instruction, pp. 87-92.
 
CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
 
Students must earn at minimum a 3.00 grade point average in courses required for the 316 and/or 317 reading licenses in order to qualify for certification.
 
Non-Degree Students
(Candidates seeking licensure only)
 
316 Reading Teacher Certification:
Eighteen semester credits of which no more than six may be earned as part of an undergraduate degree. Required courses are as follows: RDG 528, 730, 733, 741, 747, and EDM 510, 515 or 773.
 
317 Reading Specialist Certification:
Candidates must earn a master's degree, meet requirements for the 316 license, and complete RDG 735, 739, 762 and 781.
 
COURSE ROTATIONS
 
All required courses and several electives are offered at least once every other year. The rotation schedule is indicated in the course descriptions. Since changes in enrollment patterns may require changes to this schedule, students should always check the timetable before registering.
 

 

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RECREATION MANAGEMENT AND THERAPEUTIC RECREATION

 
This program is designed to provide students with individualized continuing education to develop competencies specifically related to job needs or to professional growth. The emphasis is on individualizing the student's program. Each student will select a generalized format for this program consisting of course work appropriate to the individual's needs. Programs leading to a master of science degree are available in two areas:
(1) Recreation Management
(2) Therapeutic Recreation
 
 
RECREATION MANAGEMENT
 
The master of science in recreation management prepares students for positions in public, private, and commercial recreation agencies. The curriculum consists of learning experiences critical for assuming high level management positions in the leisure service profession.
 
Graduates are prepared to:
-- plan, develop, and manage recreation programs in public and private agencies; commercial enterprises, and tourism business
-- use diverse community, natural, institutional, and human service resources to enhance programs
-- apply common and innovative management techniques for budgets, service pricing, cost analysis, business feasibility, market analysis, and promotions
-- use leadership strategies to strengthen leisure experiences for all, including those with special needs
-- apply evaluation, survey, and research methods to ensure continued improvement in leisure services
-- apply management techniques for recruitment, selection, training, and evaluation of staff and volunteers
 
Graduates are employed in:
-- local recreation and park agencies; federal natural resource agencies
-- resorts, cruise ships, ski resorts, private campgrounds, and hospitality and travel industries
-- private corporations and tourism agencies
-- health clubs and recreational fitness centers
-- youth agencies
-- Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, YM/YWCA
-- condominium developments, convention/visitor bureaus, ice arenas, marinas, golf courses, and theme parks
 
I. Admission Requirements
The minimum undergraduate prerequisite course requirements for admission to the master of science degree program in recreation management are:
 
Credits
REC100Foundations of Recreation3
REC300Program Planning in Recreation3
or
REC302Recreation Leadership and Supervision3
REC401Management in Park and Recreation Resources3
MTH205Elementary Statistics4
 
If all the above courses have not been previously taken, the recreation graduate program director will determine program deficiencies on an individual basis. The review will be based on previously taken courses as well as prior work experience. Students will be informed if there is an option to "test out" for any existing course work deficiency. The graduate program director will also determine which deficiency courses need to be taken for credit (auditing of courses might also be recommended.)
Students accepted into this program come from a variety of backgrounds including:
-- Agronomy
-- Biology
-- Business Administration
-- Elementary/Secondary Education
-- Forestry
-- Horticulture/Landscape Architecture
-- Natural Resources/Resource Management
-- Physical Education
-- Public Administration
-- Recreation Administration
-- Recreation Leadership
-- Therapeutic Recreation
 
II. Required Courses:
Degree requirements: 30 credits with a minimum of 15 credits at the graduate-only level. Required courses include:
Credits
REC520Commercial Recreation Management3
REC701Philosophical Foundations of Leisure, Play, and Recreation3
REC704Current Issues and Problems3
REC711Management of Leisure Services Organizations3
MGT734Small Business Management3
(Prerequisite: REC 520)
 
III. Thesis, Graduate Project, or Comprehensive Examination:
Students are allowed to choose from three options upon being admitted to the program.
 
Option A -- Thesis
Credits
EFN 730 Introduction to Research 3
or
HED706Research Tools and Processes3-6
REC799Research: Master's Thesis6
 
Option B -- Graduate Project
Credits
EFN 730 Introduction to Research 3
or
HED 706 Research Tools and Processes 3-6
or
EFN736Interpretation of Current Research3
REC761Graduate Project in Recreation3
 
Option C -- Comprehensive Examination
 
Course work includes all required courses plus additional elective courses selected from graduate program offerings to total 30 semester credits. A comprehensive examination is written. The examination is developed and graded by the graduate faculty. This option requires completion of EFN 730 or HED 706.
 
IV. Elective Courses:
Recommended elective graduate courses in the department of recreation management and therapeutic recreation include:
Credits
REC502Risk Management in Leisure Service Organizations3
REC700Internship in Guided Learning1-3
REC706Public Education and Recreation2
REC713Recreation Planning and Facility Development3
REC740Outdoor Education1-3
REC780A comparative Approach to Leisure and Society3
REC795Independent Study in Recreation Management1-3
REC797Special Projects in Recreation Management1-3
RTH562Inclusive Recreation Program Administration2-3
RTH570Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation4
 
 
THERAPEUTIC RECREATION
 
The master of science in therapeutic recreation prepares students for certification as Therapeutic Recreation Specialists. Students learn to develop and implement treatment, leisure, education, and recreation programs for individuals with special needs.
 
Graduates are prepared to:
-- assess the need for therapeutic recreation intervention
-- plan and evaluate individual and group treatment, leisure education and recreation participation programs
-- supervise interdisciplinary teams and human service providers
-- organize and manage services
-- direct outreach, advocacy, and public relations activities
-- assist individuals in the development of life-long leisure independence
-- address therapeutic recreation professionalization issues
-- take the national examination to become a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist
-- use advanced knowledge as a clinical administrator or consultant
 
Graduates are employed in:
-- hospitals and physical rehabilitation facilities
-- county, state, and national mental health treatment centers
-- residential settings
-- long-term care or nursing home facilities
-- community-based centers and human service agencies
-- recreation agencies, including national associations for disabled sport competitors (i.e., Special Olympics)
-- human service areas needing therapeutic recreation consultants
 
I. Admission Standards
 
Students without a previous background in therapeutic recreation as well as those who are certification eligible as a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist by the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification will be admitted into the program after fulfilling university graduate school admission requirements. Deficiencies will be determined based on the student's educational background and work experience.
The minimum undergraduate prerequisite course and competency requirements for admission to the master of science degree program in recreation with a therapeutic recreation emphasis are:
 
Undergraduate Prerequisite Course Requirements
(or equivalent knowledge)
Credits
RTH250Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation3-4
RTH326Therapeutic Recreation Populations I3
or
RTH327Therapeutic Recreation Populations II3
MTH205Elementary Statistics3-4
ESS205Human Anatomy and Physiology3
PSY304Abnormal Psychology3
PSY212Life Span Development3
 
The above courses may be taken at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse during the first two semesters of the graduate program.
 
Prerequisite Competency Requirement
Knowledge of and experience with a disability group in a therapeutic recreation setting (minimum 50 documented hours of acceptable experience).
To become eligible to sit for the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC) exam through the professional academic path, a total of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units of supportive course work must be successfully completed with at least three hours in the content of abnormal psychology, three hours in the content of anatomy and physiology, and three hours in the content area of human growth and development across the lifespan. The remaining semester hours or quarter hours of course work must be fulfilled in the content of "human services" as defined by NCTRC (human services is defined to include courses supportive to the practice of Therapeutic Recreation such as: psychology, sociology, related biological/ physical sciences, adaptive physical education, special education, education, ethics and other disciplines of study supportive to the practice of therapeutic recreation. Students must fulfill the most current NCTRC requirements for certification eligibility. Fulfilling the most recent NCTRC requirements for eligibility is the responsibility of the student.
 
II. Required Courses:
Credits
REC701Philosophical Foundations of Leisure, Play, and Recreation3
REC704Current Issues and Problems3
REC711Management of Leisure Services Organizations3
RTH593Therapeutic Recreation Trends and Issues3
RTH730Advanced Clinical Aspects in Therapeutic Recreation3
 
III. Research Options: Thesis, Graduate Project, or Comprehensive Examination
Students will select one of three research options to this graduate program. All three options require a minimum of 30 credits (37 credits minimum for those students who entered the program without a previous background in therapeutic recreation.)
 
Option A -- Thesis Credits
EFN 730 Introduction to Research 3
or
HED706Research Tools and Processes3-6
REC799Research: Master's Thesis6
 
Option B -- Graduate Project
EFN 730 Introduction to Research 3
or
EFN 736 Interpretation of Current Research 3
or
HED706Research Tools and Processes3-6
REC761Graduate Projectin Recreation3
 
Option C -- Comprehensive Examination
Option C includes all required courses, plus additional elective courses from graduate program offerings to total 30 semester credits (37 credits for those entering the program without a background in therapeutic recreation.) The additional graduate courses beyond those required must be approved by the graduate program director. A comprehensive examination is written. The examination is developed and graded by the graduate faculty in therapeutic recreation. This option requires completion of EFN 730 or HED 706.
 
IV. Program of Study
Upon admission, the student will be classified into one of two groups based upon previous academic background, certification status, and professional experience in the field of therapeutic recreation. The student will be classified either as a student without a previous background in therapeutic recreation or as a student with a previous background (certification eligible) in therapeutic recreation.
 
A. Program of study for a student without a previous background in therapeutic recreation:
This program of study requires a minimum of 37 credits. A program of study includes the required graduate courses, therapeutic recreation core courses, one of three research options, and electives. Additional credit(s) may be required to fulfill the sitting requirements of the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC). A program of study will be developed by the student and the graduate program director.
 
Therapeutic Recreation core
courses for the student without a previous background in therapeutic recreation --
In addition to the required courses, the following are required core courses for the student without a previous back-ground in therapeutic recreation:
 
Credits
RTH556Program Design and Administration of Therapeutic Recreation3
RTH570Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation4
RTH576Assessment and Treatment Planning in Therapeutic Recreation3
RTH580Leisure Education3
RTH700Internship in Therapeutic Recreation6
(Required only if NCTRC field
placement requirements are not met)
 
At the discretion of the graduate program director, previously taken equivalent undergraduate courses (therapeutic recreation core courses) may not have to be repeated on the graduate level.
 
B. Program of Study for a student with a background (certification eligible) in therapeutic recreation:
The program of study involves a minimum of 30 credits. A program of study includes the required courses, one of three research options, and electives. The program of study will be jointly developed by the student and the graduate program director.
 
V. Elective Courses:
Additional elective courses may be required to fulfill the minimum (30-37) number of credits to graduate. The elective course(s) will be determined jointly by the student and the graduate program director.
 
 

 

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SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
 
The UW-La Crosse graduate program in School Psychology offers an Education Specialist in School Psychology degree. The degree requires two years of full-time study, one summer of study, a one-year internship during the third year, completion of an Education Specialist thesis, and the passing of either the national School Psychology test or UW-L comprehensive examinations. Successful completion of all requirements for the 60 semester credit hour program leads to full licensure as a School Psychologist in Wisconsin and most other states. Students earn a 30 credit hour Master of Science in Education degree before completing the remaining Education Specialist degree requirements.

The UW-La Crosse School Psychology program is part of the Psychology Department and the College of Liberal Studies. The program is approved by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and has full approval from the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). Upon completion of all program requirements, students are eligible for certification as a Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP).

The School Psychology program prepares graduate students for licensure as school psychologists through academic course work, 700 hours of supervised school practica, completion of a thesis and a one year, 1200 hour school internship. The school psychology knowledge base includes areas of professional school psychology, educational psychology, psychological foundations, educational foundations, and mental health. To provide psychological services in educational settings, graduates of the School Psychology program must also have considerable knowledge of curriculum, special education and pupil services. Graduates of the program are employed in public schools or in educational agencies that serve public schools.

The emphasis of this program is to train school psychologists who are effective teacher, parent and school consultants. The program also emphasizes a pupil services model which addresses the educational and mental health needs of all children, from early childhood through high school.

Graduate students are placed in local schools as early and as intensively as possible. During their second, third and fourth semesters, students spend two days per week working in local schools under the direct supervision of experienced school psychologists. During these school practica, students develop professional skills in assessment, consultation, intervention, counseling, case management, and pupil services. Many of the core courses require projects that are completed in the schools during practica.

An information can be obtained at http://www.uwlax.edu/Graduate/psychology/ and an application packet can be obtained by writing the School Psychology program director, Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, 1725 State Street, La Crosse, WI 54601, or by sending an e-mail to dixon.robe@uwlax.edu. In addition to meeting all the requirements established for general graduate admissions, students must also meet School Psychology program requirements before admission to the program. These additional requirements include: three letters of recommendation, scores on the GRE general section (Verbal and Quantitative), a writing sample, a resume of educational and work experience, and a statement of purpose. 
 
REQUIREMENTS FOR EDUCATION SPECIALIST IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY DEGREE
 
General Requirements:
 
A. Complete the following requirements for a Master of Science in Education: School Psychology degree.
1) Complete 30 graduate credits.
2) A minimum of 15 of the 30 credits need to be completed at the 700 level.
3) Complete the following courses: PSY 451/551, 420/520, 757, SPY 700, 752, 758, 762 and 775.
 
B. Complete a minimum of 60 graduate credits (includes credits completed for the Master of Science in Education degree), with at least two thirds of these at the 700 or 800 level.
 
C. Complete an Education Specialist thesis within seven years of beginning the program.
 
D. Obtain a passing score (set by the National Association of School Psychologists for NCSP certification) on the National School Psychology Examination or a passing score on the comprehensive examinations written by UW-L Psychology and School Psychology faculty. The UW-L written comprehensive examinations cover the same areas assessed by the National School Psychologist examination. The areas are: assessment; prevention and intervention; evaluation and research; professional practice; applied psychological foundations; and applied educational foundations. UW-L comprehensive examinations are offered during the spring semester of each year. Students must pass either the National School Psychology exam or the UW-L comprehensive exams before being allowed to begin an internship, to obtain a school psychology position, or to apply for initial school psychology licensure.
 
E. Complete a professional portfolio that includes a variety of psychoeducational assessment cases, consultation/ intervention cases, a needs assessment, a pupil services project, and other requirements as specified in the School Psychology Handbook.
 
Course Requirements:
 
A. Psychological Foundations
Complete at least two credits in each of the following areas. Course work completed at the undergraduate level need not be repeated. At least nine credits must be completed at the graduate level:
 
 
Credits
Developmental Psychology
PSY 410/510 Advanced Developmental Psychology 3
or
PSY 710 Educational Psychology: Human Development 2-3
Cognitive Psychology
PSY 435/535 Cognitive Processes 3
Statistics
An undergraduate statistics course 3
or
EFN 735 Interpretation of Statistical Data 3
 
Childhood Behavior Disorders
PSY 717 Behavior Disorders in Children 3
 
Research Methods
PSY 420/520 Research Foundations in Psychology 3
 
Personality Theories
PSY 402/502 Personality Theories 3
 
Psychological Measurement
PSY 451/551 Psychological Measurement 3
 
Or electives approved by the School Psychology program director.
 
B. Educational Foundations
Complete three credits in each of the following areas. Course work completed at the undergraduate level need not be repeated. At least six credits must be completed at the graduate level.
 
Credits
Human Relations
EFN 705 Human Relations in School and Community 3
 
Regular Education Methods of Curriculum
EFN 400/500 School Curriculum Design 3
 
Special Education Methods
SPE 401/501 Learners with Exceptional Needs and Abilities 3
 
SPE 416/516 Introduction to Cross Categorical Special Education Characteristics 3
or
SPE 429/529 Inclusive Strategies for the Classroom 3
 
Educational Foundations
SPE 716 Teachers and the Law 3
 
Reading
RDG 320/520 Emergent Literacy 3
or
RDG 730 Assessment and Instruction of Students with ReadingDifficulties 3
 
Or electives approved by the School Psychology program director.
 
C. Core Professional Training
Complete each of the following courses. At least 45 credits must be completed in this area.
Credits
SPY700School Psychology: Role and Function2
SPY752Assessment and Remediation: Learning and Behavior Problems 3
PSY754Concepts and Applications of Pupil Services2
*PSY756Early Childhood Assessment3
PSY757Intellectual Assessment: Theory and Applications2
*SPY758Individual Intellectual Assessment: Laboratory3
*PSY759Personality Assessment3
*SPY762Supervised Practicum I in School Psychology3
*SPY763Supervised Practicum II in School Psychology3
*SPY764Supervised Practicum III in School Psychology3
PSY771Effective Interviewing1
PSY772Counseling and Therapy Methods3
SPY775Cognitive/Behavioral Interventions2
PSY776Psychological Consultation in the Schools2-3
SPY795Directed Studies1
SPY797Internship in School Psychology6
SPY800Thesis Proposal1-3
SPY801Specialist Thesis3-6
 
Or electives approved by the School Psychology program director.
 
* School Psychology course fees are at least $25.
 
Licensure, Practicum, Internship, and Thesis Requirements:
 
Provisional licensure in Wisconsin is granted after completion of all Education Specialist degree requirements, excepting the School Psychology Internship and the Education Specialist thesis. Students are eligible for full Wisconsin licensure upon completion of an internship and an Education Specialist thesis. Students who complete only the Master's degree are not eligible for licensure as a school psychologist.
Students must complete three semesters of a supervised school psychology practicum. During practicum experiences students develop school psychology professional knowledge, skills, and behavior. Core professional skills, as well as professional behavior, are critical to effective school psychology functioning. Thus, only students who have successfully completed all prerequisite course work (no incompletes) are allowed to enroll for practica. In addition, appropriate professional behavior and personal effectiveness are required for continued enrollment in practica.
Students must have their thesis proposals approved prior to starting their internships. Students are aided in developing thesis proposals in SPY 800 starting in the spring of their first year.
Internships must be in a school setting, total 1200 hours, and be supervised by a certified school psychologist and a UW-L School Psychology instructor. A site visit from the University supervisor is required each semester. All interns must pay all actual costs associated with each semester's site visit, including travel, lodging, and meals.
Students must register for the Specialist Thesis (SPY 801) no later than their final semester of internship. Students working with a faculty member on their thesis in the summer must be enrolled in a summer session of SPY 801. Because the University has a continuous registration policy for students completing a thesis, students must register for zero credits of GRC 799 and pay the special course fee of $100 for each semester thereafter until the thesis receives final University approval. Students will not be approved for a full Wisconsin license until they have completed the Education Specialist thesis.
 
Note: For additional School Psychology Program policies, students should refer to the School Psychology Graduate Student Handbook available in the School Psychology office, 341 Graff Main Hall.

 

 

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SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

 

The focus of the Master of Software Engineering (MSE) program is to teach the advanced state-of-the-art technologies in software development with hands-on experience, and to apply the knowledge to some challenging real-world problems. The program will guide the students to acquire both technical skills and software project management skills that are required to lead and to carry out software development projects.
 
Prerequisites for Admission
The students who wish to gain admission into the MSE program should have taken courses on the following topics or should have knowledge in these areas (evidence or supporting materials required):
 
1) A modern programming language such as Pascal, C, Modula, C++, Java, Smalltalk (UW-L equivalents: C-S 120, C-S 220, C-S 224)
2) Data Structures and Algorithms that includes abstract data types such as List, Stack, Queue, Tree and Graph (UW-L equivalent: C-S 340)
3) Discrete Mathematics that includes topics on Set Theory, Predicate Logic, Functions and Relations (UW-L equivalent: MTH 225)
 
Students who lack any of these prerequisites must take additional courses (not counted for credit towards the MSE program) to meet the prerequisites requirement. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.85/4.0 is required in these courses. This restriction on GPA for the prerequisite courses has been imposed to ensure that the students have adequate background in software development. In particular, non-computer science students may also be admitted into the MSE program (see the admission requirements below), and hence a thorough knowledge of the topics covered in the prerequisite courses is necessary.
 
Admission Requirements
In addition to the prerequisites mentioned above, each student must also satisfy one of the following requirements:
 
1) The student must have a bachelor's degree in software engineering, computer science, computer engineering or an equivalent major, with an overall undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.85/4.0 or a GPA of at least 3.0/4.0 in the last half of all undergraduate work or a GPA of at least 3.0/4.0 for no fewer than 12 semester credits of graduate study at another accredited graduate
institution.
 
2) The student must have a bachelor's degree in any other discipline with an overall GPA of at least 2.85/4.0 or a GPA of at least 3.0/4.0 in the last half of all undergraduate work, and should at least have two years of working experience in a software industry. In this case, the student should provide at least two references from the work place; the referees should be able to comment on the knowledge and skills of the student in software development.
 
 
Program Requirements
Each student in the program should complete 24 credits of course work and 12 credits of project work. The course work consists of five core courses and three elective courses.
 
Core Courses: Credits
C-S546Object-Oriented Software Development3
C-S741Software Engineering Principles3
C-S742Formal Methods in Software Development3
C-S743Software Verification and Validation3
C-S744Management Issues in Software Engineering3
 
Elective Courses: Credits
C-S521Programming Language Concepts3
C-S542Structure of Compilers3
C-S549Advances in Software Engineering3
C-S551User Interface Design3
C-S564Advanced Database Management Systems3
C-S570Parallel and Distributed Computing3
C-S571Data Communications3
C-S750Topics in Software Engineering1-3
C-S751Seminar in Software Engineering1-3
C-S752Independent Study1-3
 
Project Work: Credits
C-S 798 Software Development Project 1-6
 
In addition to these courses, a student must also complete C-S 798. This is a 12-credit course involving a major software development project and requires the development of software for a particular application. Upon registering for this
course, a student should choose a problem, analyze its feasibility in terms of time limits and resources, develop the requirements document and design (architectural and detailed) document, implement the design and demonstrate the product with appropriate test cases. A project proposal must be submitted to the Project Evaluation Committee (PEC) in the computer science department for approval before starting the project. This proposal should include the goals, project plan, time schedule, resource requirements and other details pertinent to the project. A student can register for the project course at any time by submitting the project proposal, and continue to work on the project thereafter. Depending on the work done in each term, the student will be given appropriate number of credits per term (a maximum of 12) as outlined in the project proposal. PEC is responsible for checking the work proposed/done in each term and giving the appropriate number of credits.
 
At the completion of the project, the student should submit a written project report that satisfies the requirements stated in A Guide for Writing a Software Development Project Report (will be available from the computer science department). This report will be evaluated by PEC. After PEC has read the report (normally within a month after submission), an oral examination will be conducted. Members of PEC and the project
supervisors/advisers (stated below) will serve as the examiners for this oral examination. The student will be given a pass/fail grade for the course at the end of the oral examination.
 
The project will address a real-world problem and hence will be selected from a source outside the computer ccience department. The purpose of this project work is to apply the knowledge gained in the course work to a real-world problem. The sources for selecting the problem include other departments (academic and administrative) in the university and industries. A faculty member in the computer science department and a supervisor in the unit from where the problem is chosen (another department or industry) will jointly supervise/guide the student. In the event of not being able to find a suitable project outside the computer science department, the student may seek a project given by one of the faculty members in the department. The same faculty will supervise/guide the student. The latter option provides an opportunity for students to conduct research in software engineering.

 

 

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SPECIAL EDUCATION
 
The graduate program in Special Education is designed for classroom teachers of students with special needs, who seek greater expertise. Certification or certifiability to teach at either the middle childhood/early adolescence or early adolescence/adolescence level, admission to the graduate school, completion of the graduate record examination or Miller Analogy Test, and completion of program application forms are required for entry into the program. To complete degree requirements, students must elect one of the following program options.
 
1. Option A: Thesis Option -- 30 semester credits including completion of a Master's Thesis
2. Option B: Seminar Paper -- 30 semester credits including completion of a Seminar Paper
3. Option C: Comprehensive Examination -- 36 semester credits and successful completion of a three-hour comprehensive examination
 
At least one-half of all credits (Options A-C) must be earned in 700-level courses. Candidates must supplement Option choice with courses from the Certification Requirement or Elective Course sections. Candidates selecting the thesis or seminar paper option must begin work on their papers with an adviser at least two terms prior to term in which they expect to graduate. Candidates selecting the comprehensive examination option must schedule their comprehensive examination with the program director one semester prior to the semester in which they expect to graduate.
 
Option A: Thesis Option
Credits
SPE715Special Education Law3
RDG730Remedial Reading3
EFN760Theory & Practice in Educational Research3
or
RDG762Reading Theory & Research3
SPE799Research: Master's Thesismaximum 6
 
Option B: Seminar Paper Option
Credits
SPE715Special Education Law3
RDG730Remedial Reading3
EFN760Theory & Practice in Educational Research3
or
RDG762Reading Theory & Research3
SPE761Seminar Paper2
 
Option C: Comprehensive Exam Option Credits
SPE715Special Education Law3
RDG730Remedial Reading3
EFN760Theory & Practice in Educational Research3
or
RDG762Reading Theory & Research3
SPE780Seminar in Special Education3
 
Elective Courses:
Credits
SPY752Assessment and Remediation:Learning & Behavior Problems 3
SPY775Cognitive/Behavioral Intervention3
SPY700School Psychology: Role & Function2
PSY754Concepts & Applications of Pupil Services2
PSY756Early Childhood Assessment3
SPY757Intellectual Assessment: Theory & Applications2
PSY717Behavior Disorders in Children3
REC701Philosophical Foundations of Leisure, Play, and Recreation3
EFN715Issues & Trends in Education3
C-I751Teacher Inquiry: Assessing Class Practice3
 
Certification Requirements:
Students seeking special education certification have two age-level options: Cross-Categorical Special Education-- Middle Childhood/Adolescence or Cross-Categorical Special Education-- Early Adolescence/Adolescence. Candidates in a Master's Degree program option may supplement with certification courses, but must abide by the 700-level course
policy.
 
Non-Degree Students:
Candidates who seek Cross-Categorical Special Education licensure-only may do so by completing the certification requirements below. This is not a degree seeking option.
 
Special Education certification requires the completion of the following:
1) All core courses
2) At least one certification option:
a. Cross-Categorical Special Education--Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence
b. Cross-Categorical Special Education--Early Adolescence/ Adolescence
3) Special Education Professional Practice
 
Core Courses: 15 credits (All core courses are required for each Certification Option.)
Credits
SPE524Classroom Management & Positive Behavior Practices3
SPE531Language Development & Disorders3
SPE540Collaboration & Transition: from School to Community3
SPE552Individual Assessment3
SPE529Inclusive Strategies for the Classroom3
 
Certification Options:
Option 1 -- 7 credits
(Cross-Categorical Special Education--Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence Courses)
Credits
SPE516Introduction to Cross-Categorical Special Education--Characteristics3
SPE546Methods in Cross-Categorical Special Education--MiddleChildhood/Early Adolescence3
SPE561Clinical in Special Education1
 
Professional Practice -- 5 credits
Credits
SPE 783 Student Teaching: CrossCategorical Special Education­Characteristics 3
SPE 786 Graduate Seminar in Special Education 2
 
Option 2 -- 7 credits
(Cross-Categorical Special Education--Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence/Adolescence Courses)
Credits
SPE516Introduction to Cross-Categorical Special Education--Middle Childhood/Early Adolescence
3
SPE547Methods in Cross-Categorical Special Education--Early Adolescence/Adolescence3
SPE561Clinical in Special Education1
 
Professional Practice -- 5 credits
Credits
SPE784Student Teaching: Cross Categorical Special Education­Early Adolescence/Adolescence
3
SPE786Graduate Seminar in Special Education2
 
 
 
 

 

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