OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (O-T)
Course Descriptions

O-T/PTS 515 Cr. 3
Functional Neuroanatomy

This course will address the anatomical basis of neuroscience with emphasis on rehabilitation. Structure and physiological function of the central nervous system will be correlated for normal and abnormal processes. Patient examples and research literature will be utilized to foster appropriate clinical decision-making skills in students. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT/PT program. (Cross-listed with PTS 515; may only earn credit in O-T or PTS.) Offered Sem. II.

O-T 520 Cr. 3
Introduction to Occupational Therapy

This course introduces the fundamentals of occupational therapy. Topics include an overview of the history of the occupational therapy profession, theoretical frameworks, the OT program curriculum design, and contemporary occupational therapy practice. Lect. 6. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Summer Session.

O-T 521 Cr. 2
Professional Foundations of Practice

A series of learning experiences designed to support clinical practice in occupational therapy. Topics will include standards of occupational therapy practice, occupational therapy core values, ethics and ethical decision-making, professional behaviors and communication, the interview process as a basic tool for gathering data, the adaptation of the interview process to include various health traditions and cultures, the importance of the self-reflective process, and universal precautions and basic skills needed when working in a healthcare situation. Lect. 2, Lab. 4. Admission to the OT program. Offered Summer Session.

O-T 523 Cr. 3
Human Physiology

A study of physiological systems of interest to therapeutic practice and the relationship of these systems to normal function. Admission to the OT/PT/PA program. Offered Summer Session.

O-T 524 Cr. 4
Human Anatomy

Provides an in-depth understanding of the gross anatomy of the human body through lecture, laboratory experiences, audiovisual, computer and gross cadaver prosection. Systems included are musculoskeletal, neurological, and skeletal. Biomechanical function, topographic and clinical applications are emphasized. Lect. 2, Lab. 4. Admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 526 Cr. 2
Critical Analysis of Human Movement: Development, Learning and Control

This course examines the development of movement and basic motor learning. Basic motor control theories will be compared and contrasted in relation to the development of postural foundations and movement. Motor control/learning theories will be discussed and rudimentarily applied as movement that is essential to occupational performance across the lifespan. Lect. 1, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the graduate OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 530 Cr. 3
Occupational Performance Analysis

This course examines key concepts used in the description and analysis of occupational performance. This form, function, and meaning of occupations will be explored in relation to performance areas, process skills, activity and occupational configurations, client factors, contextual issues (culture, time, spirituality, physical and human aspect, etc.). Task analysis, selection and grading of activity, the teaching/learning process, compensatory techniques, and occupation as therapeutic ends and means will be explored and applied in relation to the design and implementation of treatment with various populations in traditional and non-traditional practice settings. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 544 Cr. 2
Biomechanics and Kinesiology Applications in Occupational Therapy

This course will apply principles of biomechanics and kinesiology to the understanding and analysis of movement in relationship to occupational performance. This will include the study of structure and function of the skeletal, muscular and neuromuscular systems and their influences on normal and pathological motion and how this may impact occupational performance. This course will explore kinesiology considerations for specific musculoskeletal regions including the head, torso, upper and lower extremities and how these relate to commonly used therapeutic treatment techniques employed by occupational therapists. Students will explore research tools utilized in biomechanics and their application to a variety of movement based research questions. Lect. 1, Lab. 2.  Prerequisite: Accepted into the OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 550 Cr. 2
Scholarly Practice I: Foundations of Assessment

This course introduces the student to principles of occupational therapy assessment. Topics covered include psychometric aspects of assessment, selection of assessment tools, reading and interpreting test manuals, use of standardized and non-standardized assessment tool, and the role of the occupational therapy assistant in assessment. Students will begin to develop their professional skill set by administering, recording, and interpreting the results of several assessment tools. Students will conduct interviews as well as practice documentation skills during this course.  Lect. 1, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 572 Cr. 2
Occupational Therapy Intervention: Group Dynamics

This course will provide students with a foundation in basic therapeutic communication skills. Models of group leadership used in occupational therapy treatment will be emphasized. Topics will include: basic styles of communication, stages of team building, group leadership in therapy, development of therapeutic use of self, conflict resolution, conflict negotiation, professional behaviors, supervision of occupational therapy staff and occupational therapy group models used in treatment.  Lect. 1, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 573 Cr. 1
Level 1 Fieldwork: Mental Illness

This mental health 30- hour field experience is designed to provide an opportunity to practice occupational therapy interventions for individuals who have mental health disorders. Beginning professional abilities, observation and initial data gathering skills will be practiced. Fieldwork will be arranged by the occupational therapy fieldwork coordinator and supervised by instructional staff. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. II. Pass/fail grading.

O-T 574 Cr. 3
Occupations and Interventions: Pediatrics I

This course emphasizes the child as an occupational being within contexts: (e.g. greater social/political context, typical play contexts, and the family/home context). The occupational development and roles of children ages 0-18 will be examined in relation to typical development milestones, the development of daily living activities and the development of play. The application of OT evaluation and intervention principles and the use of clinical reasoning will be integrated within selected frames of reference (acquisitional, motor acquisitional, biomechanical). These will be integrated with developmental principles, occupations and play. The effects of selected medical conditions more commonly seen in pediatric OT clients also will be covered (CP, MD, spina bifida, Downs, seizure disorders, sensory processing disorders). Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. I

O-T/PTS 611 Cr. 2
Applied and Pathological Physiology

This course will provide the student with information about the pathophysiology of various organ systems and physiological control mechanisms as they pertain to the practice of physical therapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the ability of the student to perform differential diagnosis in a physical therapy setting and to determine when further diagnostics may be indicated. Patient problems will be utilized to allow students to practice differential diagnosis and problem solving. Prerequisite: Enrollment in OT or DPT program. (Cross-listed with PTS 611). Offered Sem. II.

O-T 620 Cr. 2
Occupations in Rural Context

The course investigates the unique features of rural health care delivery. This includes limited health care access and public health issues. Students will explore the complexities of rural communities, the diversity of rural populations and the diseases affecting these communities. In addition, the physical and psychological factors influencing health will be examined. The role of occupational therapy will be explored emphasizing preventative programming, broad based access to healthcare providers and community health initiatives. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program.  Offered Summer Session.

O-T 630 Cr. 2
Occupational Therapy Practice: Wellness Perspectives

The relationship of health, prevention, and wellness will be examined from the perspective of occupation and lifestyle redesign. Alternative and complementary medicine/therapies from various cultures and perspectives, along with literature regarding the mind/body connection, will be critically examined in relation to the provision of occupational therapy services as they relate to occupational wellness. Injury prevention programs, Life Style Redesign, community needs assessment, and grant-writing to obtain funding also will be addressed. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 640 Cr. 1
Assistive Technology

This course will refine skills in task analysis, grading, adaptive equipment fabrication, and the therapeutic use of high and low technology in OT treatment. Students will explore clinical decision making when designing, fabricating, and assigning equipment to a variety of clients with various physical and psychosocial dysfunctions. Computer technology and specific tool use will be emphasized. Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 641 Cr. 2
Health Care Systems

This course addresses the evolution of the health care industry. It will critically analyze, from the perspectives of the consumer, provider, manager, and taxpayer, the greater social systems and trends that impact its present state, and include a comparison of the health care industry in other countries. Service provision will be examined from the standpoints of fiscal management, human resource management, and operations management. The importance of advocacy for one’s profession and the importance of knowledge and collaboration with other health professions will be discussed. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 672 Cr. 3
Occupational Performance: Mental Illness

This course will include the study of occupational dysfunction as a result of mental and cognitive dysfunction. Models and frames of reference utilized in the treatment of individuals with mental health diagnoses will be examined and critiqued. The role of occupational therapy within a variety of in-patient and community settings will be presented. A laboratory component of the course will be used to explore group process, assessment and treatment techniques, and documentation specifically for this population. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 673 Cr. 3
Occupational Performance: Physical Dysfunction I

The effects of acute and chronic disability on occupational performance will be explored in the context of the adult rehabilitation patient with orthopedic conditions from diverse backgrounds. Evaluation and treatment of the adult individual with orthopedic rehabilitative needs will be emphasized. This course will include a laboratory experience, which allows students opportunities to practice assessment tools and treatment intervention methods typically used with persons with orthopedic problems. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 720 Cr. 1-3
Selected Topics in Occupational Therapy

This course offers in-depth study of particular concepts, clinical specialties, and/or non-traditional practice areas in occupational therapy. Topics are selected by the instructor and/or as developed by student/faculty dialogue to meet special interests and needs. Topics are relevant to occupational therapy education, and are not found elsewhere in the university curriculum. Prerequisite: admission to the graduate OT program. Repeatable for credit – maximum 6. Department option for pass/fail grading. Offered occasionally.

O-T 723 Cr. 1
International Perspectives in Occupational Therapy

This course offers in-depth study in the area of international perspectives in occupational therapy, specifically similarities and differences in OT practice between the US and Scotland. This course will be offered collaboratively between the occupational therapy programs at UW-L and Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, Scotland. Students from both universities will have 2 options for participation in this course. The travel option will consist of coursework and an intensive 1 week experience abroad. During this 1 week experience students will attend select OT classes at the host university and participate in learning experiences/job shadowing in the host community. The host option will consist of coursework and hosting an exchange student from the other university. Following the travel/host portion of the course, all students will participate in videoconference sessions to discuss similarities and differences in occupational therapy practice and consider how cultural factors (governmental policies and funding sources) influence OT practice. Students will be responsible for travel and living expenses while abroad. Prerequisite: 1st or 2nd year in OT program. Repeatable for credit – maximum 2. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 726 Cr. 1
Fieldwork Seminar

This course will address critical issues directly related to professional development, fieldwork preparation, and licensure and certification prior to beginning Level II fieldwork. Strategies for successful Level II fieldwork experience, goal setting, and continued competencies are highlighted. Professional skills such as leadership, quality improvement, and professional advocacy will be addressed. Students will, additionally, be challenged to create a professional development plan. Teaching methods in this seminar format course will include: small group discussion, experiential learning groups and group projects. Prerequisite: Completion of Level I Fieldwork requirements and all didactic courses required through Fall II. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 750 Cr. 3
Scholarly Practice II: Occupational Therapy Research

This course is the second in the series of scholarly practice courses. It is designed to help the students become familiar with research methodologies used in occupational therapy and to gain experience in selected steps of the research process. Topics covered include reading a scholarly article, literature searching strategies, research methodologies (single-subject, correlation, research, descriptive, qualitative, etc.) principles of ethical research, and application/ interpretation of statistical data. Students will read occupational therapy literature extensively and discuss in class. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 760 Cr. 3
Scholarly Practice III: Research Seminar

This course is the third in the series of five scholarly practice courses. It is designed as a seminar course, which provides the opportunity for students to participate in research data collection and analysis. Students will analyze data sets using SPSS and participate in various data collection exercises in a laboratory setting. Students also will gain practice-writing results. Lect. 2, Lab. 7. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Summer Session.

O-T 770 Cr. 2
Scholarly Practice IV: Evidence-Based Practice

This course is the fourth in the series of scholarly practice courses. This course will introduce students to concepts of occupational therapy evidence-based clinical practice. It includes application and comparison of several rubrics for evaluating levels of evidence, searching strategies for locating completed reviews, and participation in evidence-based reviews of the literature. Students will further develop expertise at reading professional literature and scholarly writing in this course. Lect. 1, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 772 Cr. 3
Impact of Psychosocial Issues on Occupation

This course is designed to foster an understanding of psychological factors that may influence health, wellness and the disease process. Psychosocial factors affecting chronic illness and long term disabilities will be highlighted. Specific mental health conditions will be presented. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 773 Cr. 3
Occupational Performance: Physical Dysfunction II

The effects of acute and chronic disability on occupational performance will be explored in the context of the adult rehabilitation patient of diverse backgrounds with neurological conditions. Evaluation and treatment of the adult individual with neurological rehabilitative needs will be emphasized. This course will include a laboratory experience, which will allow students opportunities to practice assessment tools and treatment intervention methods typically used with persons with neurological problems. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. I.

O-T 774 Cr. 3
Occupations and Interventions: Pediatrics II

This is a second course in a two-semester sequence of the study of occupational therapy as it relates to children. The application of selected occupational therapy models, frames of reference (visual information analysis, psychosocial, coping, NDT, and SI), and the OT process in the provision of occupational therapy services for children. The occupational development and roles of children ages 0 through 18 will be examined in relation to social communication/participation and education performance. Medical conditions (autistic spectrum, emotional disorders, reactive attachment disorder, ADHD, learning disabilities, Fragile X, etc.) and their effects on childhood occupational functioning will be examined. Clinical reasoning will be used as developmental principles and characteristics, childhood occupations, childhood contexts, play, and occupation therapy principles, disease process, OT theories, and frames of reference are synthesized in the planning and provision of occupational therapy interventions. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 775 Cr. 1
Critical Analysis of Practice

This is the first of a two-course experience with problem-based learning. Students will work in small groups to process a series of virtual and real problems. These cases will be typical to occupational therapy practice and will require synthesis of material from several courses. Problems may relate to the OT process, ethical issues, supervision, etc. All cases will be written to develop critical thinking and/or clinical reasoning skills that will be required of occupational therapists practicing in today’s health care arena. Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Repeatable for credit – maximum 2.

O-T 776 Cr. 3
Occupations and Interventions: Older Adult

Occupational performance in the aging population will be explored with emphasis on the impact of disease or injury in the older adult population from diverse backgrounds. Specific focus will be on analysis of the socio-cultural, environmental and personal life roles of the elderly as well as those disease/dysfunction processes that frequently impact this population. Students will practice the occupational therapy processes of observation, evaluation, analysis and treatment of this population during the laboratory component of this course. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 780 Cr. 2
Scholarly Practice V: Scientific Writing

This is the final course in the five-course sequence of Scholarly Practice and is designed to help students improve their scientific writing skills and research skills. Scientific writing guidelines and APA formal will be reviewed. Information on searching for grants and grant writing will be introduced. Students will write grant proposals for the wellness programs they develop in OT 630, Perspectives on Wellness. The importance of scientific reasoning and its relationship to clinical reasoning will be emphasized. Lect. 1, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: enrollment in the OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 785 Cr. 2
Advanced Concepts in Occupational Therapy

This seminar course is designed to explore various issues of importance to contemporary occupational therapy practice. Students will revisit major occupational therapy theorists and draw connections between theory, research, and clinical practice. Lect. 1, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Offered Sem. II.

O-T 790 Cr. 1
Level I Fieldwork: Physical Disabilities

This 30-hour fieldwork will provide an opportunity for students to observe and practice occupational therapy in a clinical setting with a variety of diverse populations. Professional abilities including cultural sensitivity, the use of occupation within a clinical setting, preliminary documentation and assessment skills will be experienced. Fieldwork will be arranged by the occupational therapy academic fieldwork coordinator and supervised by clinical fieldwork educators. Prerequisite: admission to OT program. Offered Sem. I. Pass/Fail grading.

O-T 791 Cr. 1
Level I Fieldwork: Pediatrics

This pediatric fieldwork experience is designed to provide an opportunity to integrate and apply content from pediatric course work in a practice setting. In addition, it will provide opportunities for students to practice self-reflection as it relates to self-and other-observation in the clinic. Treatment design, implementation, clinical reasoning and professional abilities will be practiced. This 30-hour fieldwork will be arranged by the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator and supervised by instructional staff and school based occupational therapists. Prerequisite: admission to OT program. Offered Sem. II. Pass/Fail grading.

O-T 795 Cr. 6
Level II Fieldwork

The Level II Fieldwork experience provides the student with a 12-week clinical placement in a practice setting under the supervision of an approved occupational therapy clinical fieldwork educator. Students will practice occupational therapy assessment, interventions, measuring outcomes, and documentation. This course provides opportunities to apply didactic learning in clinical practice. Students are required to complete six months of full time fieldwork within a 24 month period. This 12-week course is repeated 1 time for a total of 24 weeks. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program. Repeatable for credit – maximum 12. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Sem. I and Summer Session.

O-T 798 Cr. 1-6
Independent Study in Occupational Therapy

Independent, in-depth study of some specific problem or area in occupational therapy. This course shall be taken under the direction and supervision of a member of the occupational therapy faculty. Repeatable for credit – maximum 6. Prerequisite: admission to the OT program.

O-T 799 Cr. 1-4
Research: Master’s Thesis

An independent research project is to be selected and executed under the direction of an OT department faculty member by those students electing to pursue a thesis track. The project may be in any area related to occupational therapy. Repeatable for credit – minimum 4, maximum 6. Prerequisite: OT 760: Scholarly Practice; admission to the OT program. Pass/Fail grading.