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THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (CBA)

THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND TEACHER EDUCATION (HPERTE)

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION (SOE)

THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL STUDIES (CLS)

THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ALLIED HEALTH (SAH)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (CBA)

 

Interim Dean - William Colclough

Assistant to Dean - Amelia Dittman

223 Wimberly Hall; (608)785-8092

www.uwlax.edu/ba/

 

Departments/Units

Accountancy

Business Development Center

Economics

Finance

Information Systems

Management

Marketing

 

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science

Master of Business Administration

 

 

MAJORS AND MINORS

The following majors and minors are available:

 

Majors:

            Accountancy

            Economics

            Finance

            Finance with Risk and Insurance Concentration

            Information Systems

            International Business

            Management

               Tracks in:

                        General Management and Technology

                        Human Resources

                        International Management Marketing

Minors:

            Accountancy

            International Business


 
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MISSION

The College of Business Administration is an institution of higher education dedicated to the personal and professional development of its students. The college’s program provides our students with an integrated business education at the undergraduate and master’s levels that prepares them for successful professional careers. Our graduates will be prepared to be effective problem-solvers, ethical decision-makers, and life-long learners in a dynamic, diverse world environment.

 

The primary purpose of the College of Business Administration is to provide education leading to baccalaureate and graduate degrees in business supplemented by appropriate research and service activities. As such, the college emphasizes academic excellence in its educational programs and emphasizes quality teaching and appropriate scholarly activities that support the educational mission of the institution. The college also offers professionals within the region opportunities for graduate education and professional development; provides professional expertise for organizations in the area; publishes regional economic data through the quarterly La Crosse Area Business and Economic Review; and cultivates a collegial, supportive organizational climate that stimulates individual achievement and contributes to the personal and professional development of students, faculty and staff. The college offers business programs that prepare graduates to enter professional fields in business and government. Specific objectives in student learning include the following:

 

1.         To provide a broad-based educational foundation in the arts, humanities, and sciences.

2.         To provide a broad understanding of world events as they relate to current social forces.

3.         To develop an understanding of business functions and their inter-relationships.

4.         To develop a broad understanding of the role of technological change and the importance of information systems.

5.         To develop an understanding of business ethics and the relationships among government agencies and business in the domestic and global economy.

6.         To develop research skills and the ability to apply quantitative and behavioral skills in the decision-making process.

7.         To develop a high level of competence in at least one field of study in business.

Additional objectives of the college are to serve the business community in western Wisconsin by offering business outreach programs, providing business consulting services, and conducting research projects. The college is committed to attracting and retaining a highly qualified faculty who are dedicated to excellence in teaching and to provide them with opportunities for continued professional development in research and service.

 

 

ADVISER ASSIGNMENT

Students are assigned to faculty advisers in the freshman year. Advisers will help students develop programs, plan schedules, discuss major and career choices and refer for assistance in the case of academic difficulties. Students are required to meet with their adviser at least once a semester. An academic adviser is also available in the Dean’s Office, 223 Wimberly Hall.

 

The final responsibility for selecting courses and meeting graduation requirements rests with the student. Students should review course prerequisites by checking course descriptions in the appropriate listings of this catalog and consult with their faculty adviser and/or seek assistance from the dean’s office. Program advising is also available on the CBA web site: http://www.uwlax.edu/ba/.

 

 

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ADMISSION TO THE BUSINESS PROGRAM

Students who desire to major in business must apply for admission to the business program in order to register for upper division (300-400 level) courses offered by the college. A separate application for admission to the business program must be completed and approved by the dean prior to the semester the business major plans to take upper division College of Business Administration course work. To be eligible for admission, a student must meet the following criteria:

 

1.         Complete the following five courses with a minimum grade of “C” in each: ACC 221, 222; ECO 110, 120; MGT 205.

2.         Earn 54 or more credits.

3.         Complete at least four of the following six pre-business courses:

            Pre-Business Courses

            BUS     230

            C-S      101 or 120

            ENG    110

            MTH    175 (or 207) and 205

            I-S       220

(Any remaining pre-business courses not taken prior to admission should be completed during the first semester after admission to the program.)

4.        Earn a 2.50 cumulative GPA at time of application.  This includes courses taken at UW-La Crosse and elsewhere.

 

Application forms for admission to the business program are obtained from the Dean’s Office, 223 Wimberly Hall. It is the student’s responsibility to make certain that appropriate approval has been received prior to registration for upper division business classes.

 

To avoid scheduling problems, pre-business students should work closely with their faculty advisers in order to complete the pre-business program within their freshman and sophomore years at UW-L.

 

Students who undertake their freshman and sophomore years of study at another university should familiarize themselves with the college’s pre-business requirements and the university’s General Education  program, and plan their program of study accordingly.

 

A guide for course sequencing pre-business and professional core requirements is as follows:

 

 
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Freshman Year

* MTH 175 (or 207): Applied Calculus

* MTH 205      Elementary Statistics

* ECO 110      Microeconomics and Public Policy

* ECO 120      Global Macroeconomics

* ENG 110      College Writing I

* C-S   101 or 120 Introduction to Computing or Software Design I

 

It is recommended that students majoring in information systems take C-S 120 in lieu of C-S 101.

 

Sophomore Year

**ACC 221     Financial Accounting Principles

    ACC 222     Managerial Accounting Principles

    MGT 205     The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

    I-S    220     Information Systems for Business Management

    BUS 230      Business and Economics Research and Communication

 

Admission to the business program is required prior to enrollment in the junior/ senior level business courses (see previous page).

 

Junior Year

MGT   308       Behavior and Theory in Organizations

MGT    393      Production Management

MKT   309      Principles of Marketing

FIN      355      Principles of Financial Management

 

Students will also be completing their business major requirements during their junior and senior years.

 

Senior Year

MGT    449 Administrative Policy Determination

(taken final semester; requires completion of all other core requirements)

 

           

CORE/MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

All students enrolled in any program within the college must complete the business core and all requirements for the major. The College of Business Administration professional core requirements are:

Course No

Title

Credits

 ECO 

110 Microeconomics and Public Policy  3
ECO 120 Global Macroeconomics  3
MGT 205 The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 3
ACC 221 Accounting Principles I 3
ACC 222 Accounting Principles II 3
I-S  220 Information Systems for Business Management 3
BUS 230 Business and Economics Research and Communications 3
MGT 308  Behavior & Theory in Organizations  3
MKT  309 Principles of Marketing 3
FIN 355 Principles of Financial Management 3
MGT 393  Production Management 3
MGT 449 Administrative Policy Determination  (Final Semester) 3
Total Common Core   36   
Major Requirements  21-28  

(See appropriate department listings)

Total credits required for graduation   120     

 

 
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Second Major in College of Business Administration

Business students may complete a second business major by completing all courses required for the second major as described in the catalog. Students may not use the same courses to fulfill both majors.

 

Business students seeking a second major or minor in liberal studies and science areas, including economics, may do so by completing all requirements of the major or minor they elect, as stated in the catalog.

 

Scholarships

Scholarships are available to students who have demonstrated outstanding leadership qualities and have achieved scholastic excellence in the College of Business Administration program. Information may be obtained from the UW-La Crosse Foundation Office in the Cleary Alumni and Friends Center or on the Web at www.foundation.uwlax.edu.

 

Internships

Students may elect to take up to 15 College of Business Administration internship

credits upon receiving approval of the department chair and dean; however, a maximum of six will be counted toward the 120 credits required for graduation. Internship credits may be applied toward fulfilling major requirements. To be eligible for a College of Business Administration internship, a student must have a cumulative grade point of 2.50 or above and have completed the following: ACC 221, 222; BUS 230; ECO 110, 120; FIN 355; I-S 220; MGT 205; 308; MKT 309.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

 

Students seeking to graduate from the College of Business Administration must:

 

  1. Fulfill the university’s General Education requirements.

  2. Achieve a minimum 2.00 grade point average in the business core and major. Students majoring in accountancy must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 in the core and in their major.

  3. Fulfill all other university general requirements.

  4. Complete at least 60 credits outside business. (Up to nine credits of economics may be counted as outside business.)

  5. Complete at least 50% of the business course requirements in residence at UW-L.

 

 

 
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THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND TEACHER EDUCATION (HPERTE)

 

Dean (Interim) — Garth Tymeson

Associate Deans (Interim) — Mandi Anderson, Ron Rochon

Assistants to the Dean — Theda Holder, Sandra Keller

124 Mitchell Hall; (608)785-8156

www.uwlax.edu/HPER/index.html

 

For School of Education listings, see page 67.

 

Departments/Units

Exercise and Sport Science

Health Education and Health Promotion

Intercollegiate Athletics

Recreation Management & Therapeutic Recreation

Recreational Sports

University Graduate Studies

 

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science

Master of Public Health

Master of Science

 

Majors, Minors, Emphases and Concentrations:

Athletic Training

Community Health Education

Exercise and Sport Science with emphases in:

            Fitness

            Sport Management

            Physical Education

*School Health Education                    

*Recreation Management

Therapeutic Recreation

 

Concentrations in:

            Coaching Competitive Athletics

            Special Physical Education

            Strength and Conditioning

 

In addition to their major academic area, students may choose a second major, minor, emphasis or concentration from the above list. Programs outside of the college of HPERTE are also available, excluding majors in the College of Business and professional programs in the College of Science and Allied Health. See an assistant to the dean for available programs.

 

 

 
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Transfer Policy

UW-L students transferring into the College of HPERTE must have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher at the time of transfer.

 

The College of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Teacher Education (HPERTE) at UW-L specializes in the preparation of professionals for careers in health education/promotion, physical education/exercise and sport sciences, recreation/leisure, and K-12 education. Programs leading to physical education, health education, and K-12 teacher certification are state, regionally, and nationally accredited. Many of the graduate programs offered by the College are also nationally accredited. For additional information on pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, elementary, middle, and secondary teacher preparation, see the School of Education section (page 67).

 

Non-teaching professional preparation programs are available for students pursuing careers in community health education and health promotion, athletic training/sports medicine, sport management, fitness leadership, recreation management, and therapeutic recreation.

 

All professional programs have strong academic foundations in General Education requirements, professional cores, and field-based experiences to best prepare students for a wide variety of careers and job opportunities. Most programs culminate with a university-supervised “on-the-job” experience such as student teaching, internship, or preceptorship.

 

Personalized advisement is a key element in the success of all students in the College of HPERTE. Each student is assigned a faculty adviser when he/she enters the college. In addition, the college has academic assistants to the dean who work with students to verify final degree requirements. The Career Services Office provides individual career counseling and job seeking support for all students.

 

Several comprehensive community service programs housed in the College of HPERTE provide students with “hands-on” experiences to supplement classroom  learning. Included among these programs are the La Crosse Exercise and Health Program, Special Populations Exercise Program, Strength and Conditioning Center, Musculoskeletal Research Center, Intramural and Recreational Sports, Intercollegiate Athletics, National Youth Sports Program, Adventure Education Ropes Course and Climbing Wall, Community Recreation Special Events, and numerous collaborative partnerships with community and educational agencies.

 

 

 

  
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 CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

The Center of Excellence designation was awarded to the Department of Exercise and Sport Science by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. The purpose of the center, which reflects the excellent reputation of the department, is to serve as a catalyst for maintaining faculty and curricular vitality while expanding the scope of comprehensive services provided to professionals in Wisconsin and throughout the nation. General goals are to provide inservice and expertise in emerging content areas and technology to physical educators and students in professional preparation programs; modify undergraduate and master’s curricula to incorporate recent trends and projected professional needs and expand research and public service components with special emphasis on assessment.

 

A three-dimensional professional preparation model was developed with the following foci: (1) enhancing life span motor development; (2) promoting the major purposes of professional preparation in physical education — prevention of injury or illness, skill enhancement, meaningful active living, and rehabilitation; and (3) developing instruments for assessment of performance and programs. Additional emphasis is placed on the importance of movement of young children and on age-related changes in active, older adults to develop and maintain efficient movement throughout the lifespan. The professional preparation programs within the Department of Exercise and Sport Science prepare graduates to assist individuals of all ages in developing meaningful, active lifestyles. Improving the level of skill in a wide variety of activities and promoting effective movement patterns will result in more active and healthy individuals in our society. For additional information regarding the Center of Excellence in Physical Education, please contact: Department Chair, Exercise and Sport Science, Mitchell Hall, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI 54601.

 

Note:  The Health Education and Health Promotion Department has made numerous changes to its curriculum, which are not reflected in this catalog.  The school health education program has changed as well as many course numbers, prerequisites, descriptions and credits.  The department has changed its department abbreviations as follows:

 

HED – general courses applicable to both majors.

CHE – courses applicable to community health majors.

SHE – courses applicable to school health majors.

 

Please see the health education Web site at www.uwlax.edu/hper/hehp for updated information.

 

 

 

 

 
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HEALTH EDUCATION AND HEALTH PROMOTION (HED)

 

Two majors are offered at the undergraduate level. The School Health Education major is specifically designed to prepare teachers for the school setting and related community agencies where a teaching background is desired. The Community Health Education major uses an interdisciplinary approach to prepare students for positions in national, state and local public health agencies, voluntary agencies, business and industry, health care settings and community-based organizations.

 

Two graduate degrees, Master of Science in Health Education (School Health Education and Community Health Education Concentrations), and Master of Public Health in Community Health Education, are also offered. See Health Education in the Graduate Catalog.

 

Undergraduate Health Education Curriculum:

Students desiring to major in school health education must be enrolled in the College of HPERTE, apply for admission to teacher education (see the academic assistant to the dean, 125 Mitchell for details), and satisfy the following requirements:

 

            Note:   BIO 103 or 105, CHM 100 or CHM 103 are prerequisites for all health majors or minors.

 

*    This course will also fulfill General Education will also fulfill General Education requirements.

** BIO 312-313 can be substituted for ESS 205-206.

 

School Health Education Major

 

Requirements in Health Education:                                                  29-31 Cr.

HED   

205   

  Introduction to Health and Wellness Education   

  3

HED   

210   

  Introduction to School Health Programs   

3

HED   

251   

  Consumer Health and Safety Education   

  1

HED   

252   

  Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for School Populations   

 

1  

HED   

310   

  Introduction to Curricular Processes and Instructional Techniques   

   

  2

HED   

331   

  Nutrition Education   

   3

HED   

333   

  Drugs, Society and Human Behavior

  3

HED   

335   

  Human Ecology and Environmental Health   

  2

HED   

345   

  Issues in Emotional Health   

  3

HED   

351   

  Microcomputer Applications in Health Education   

   1

HED   

354   

  Stress Management and Relaxation Skills   

  1

HED   

420   

  Sexual Health Promotion   

   3

HED   

454   

  Teaching Stress Management and Relaxation Skills   

1

HED   

460   

  Health Promotion and Preference   

  1

Electives:   

   

  One elective course in HED   

  1-3

 

 

  
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Requirements in Science:                                                                            14-15 Cr.

*   

  BIO   

 103   

  Introductory Biology   

 4

   

   

   

    or

*   

  BIO   

 105    

  General Biology   

 4

*   

  CHM   

 100   

Contemporary Chemistry   

 4

   

   

   

   or

*   

CHM   

 103   

General Chemistry I   

 5

**   

ESS   

 205   

  Human Anatomy   

 3

**   

ESS   

 206   

  Human Physiology   

 3

 

Requirements in Education:                                                                          32 Cr.

C-I   

  212   

  Level I Clinical Experience in Health Education   

 1

PSY   

  310   

  Child Development   

 

EDM   

  317   

  Educational Media   

 1 

EDM   

  318   

  Educational Media — Materials Production   

 1

ESS   

  321   

  Evaluation in Health Education and Physical Education   

 2

PSY   

  370   

  Educational Psychology   

 3

C-I   

  402   

  Clinical Fieldwork Experience in Health Education   

 1

C-I   

  403   

  Student Teaching   

 15

C-I   

  404   

  Teaching Internship   

 15

C-I   

  410   

  Curriculum Development in Health Education   

  2

C-I   

  412   

  Instructional Techniques in Health Education   

  2

C-I   

  415   

  Philosophical Foundations of Health Education   

  1

 

Statutory Requirements:                                                                                15 Cr.

RDG   

328   

Reading in the Content Areas   

3

RDG 

432   

Middle Level Reading   

3

*EFN     

205

Understanding Human Differences   

3

ESS   

231   

Introduction to Special Physical Education   

3

*ERS     

100

Introduction to Minority Cultures in the United States 

3

   

   

   or

*HIS      

306

History of Ethnic America  

3

   

   

   or

*SOC     

225

Racial and Ethnic Minorities 

3

   

   

   or

*W-S    

230 

Women’s Diversity: Race, Class and Culture

3

 

 

School Health Education Minor

 

Requirements in Health Education:                                                              24 cr.

HED   

205   

  Introduction to Health and Wellness Education   

3

HED   

210   

  Introduction to School Health Programs     

3

HED   

251   

  Consumer Health and Safety Education   

1

HED   

252   

  Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for School Populations    

1 

HED   

310   

  Introduction to Curricular Processes and Instructional Techniques    

2

HED   

331   

  Nutrition Education    

3

HED   

333   

  Drugs, Society and Human Behavior   

3

HED   

335   

  Human Ecology and Environmental Health   

2

HED   

345   

  Issues in Emotional Health    

3

HED   

420   

  Sexual Health Promotion    

3

 

 

 
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Requirements in Science:                                                                          14-15 Cr.

* BIO 103   

  Introductory Biology   

4

   

   or

* BIO 105    

  General Biology   

4

* CHM 100   

  Contemporary Chemistry   

   

   or

* CHM 103   

  General Chemistry I   

5

**ESS 205   

  Human Anatomy   

3

**ESS 206   

  Human Physiology   

3

 

Requirements in Education:                                                                              21 Cr.

C-I   

402   

  Clinical Fieldwork Experience in Health Education   

1

C-I    

403   

  Student Teaching   

15

C-I    

410   

  Curriculum Development in Health Education   

2

C-I

412

  Instructional Techniques in Health Education   

2

C-I   

415   

  Philosophical Foundations in Health Education   

1

 

 

 

Statutory Requirements:                                                                                     12 Cr.

   RDG   

328   

  Reading in the Content Areas   

3

   RDG   

432   

  Middle Level Reading   

3         

* EFN     

205

   Understanding Human Differences 

3

   ESS   

231   

  Introduction to Special Physical Education   

3

 

 

Community Health Education Major

 

Students desiring to major in community health education must be enrolled in the College of Health, Physical Education and Recreation and satisfy the following requirements:

 

Requirements in Health Education:                                                                          55 cr.

HED   

205   

  Introduction to Health and Wellness Education   

3

HED   

240   

  Community Health Education Foundations   

3

HED   

331   

  Nutrition Education   

3

HED   

333   

  Drugs, Society and Human Behavior   

3

HED   

335   

  Human Ecology and Environmental Health   

2

HED   

340   

  Epidemiology and Community Health Problems   

3

HED   

350   

  Biometry and Research Design   

3

HED   

351   

  Microcomputer Applications in Health Education   

1

HED   

420   

  Sexual Health Promotion   

3

HED   

440   

  Program Development in Community Health Education   

3

HED   

441   

  Human Disease Prevention and Control   

3

HED   

452   

  Health Aspects of Aging   

3

HED   

491   

  Senior Seminar in Community Health Education   

1

HED   

498   

  Community Health Education Preceptorship   

12

 

 

 

 
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Exploration and Competency Development Areas

Select at least nine credits from non-required Health Education courses at the 300-

and 400-levels.

 

Interdisciplinary Requirements:

* C-S   101   

  Introduction to Computing   

 4 

**ESS 205   

  Human Anatomy   

 3

**ESS 206   

  Human Physiology   

 3

   CST 250   

   Introduction to Small Group Discussion   

 3

* MTH 205   

  Elementary Statistics   

 4

   

   or

* MTH 250   

  Statistics   

 3

 

Focus Areas

Each student is encouraged to develop an area of focus within their health education major. With an adviser, the student will select a group of courses that will prepare them for a field of practice. Focus areas the student may select are:

 

Instructional Design and Educational Technologies

Environmental Health

Gerontology

Health Administration

Health Care Education and Counseling

Health Marketing

Worksite Health Promotion

 

 

EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE (ESS)

 

At the undergraduate level, the exercise and sport science major has three emphases: physical education teacher certification, fitness, and sport management. The department also offers a major in athletic training.

 

Note: Students enrolled in exercise and sport science majors must earn a grade of “C” or better in all required ESS courses listed in the prescribed programs.

 

 

 
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Exercise and Sport Science Major — Physical Education Teacher Certification

 

Graduates of this teacher education curriculum are prepared to teach in K-12 physical education programs in Wisconsin and other states. To complement the broadly based program leading to a B.S. degree in physical education, students may choose a concentration or another major or minor. Concentrations are offered in special physical education (certification for physical education teacher certification majors only) and

coaching competitive athletics (open to students in the College of HPERTE, including the School of Education). The additional academic major/minor enables the student to become fully certified in other subjects as well as physical education. (See

p. 69 for detailed statement of teacher education requirements.)

 

Requirements in Exercise and Sport Science Major — Physical Education

Teacher Certification                                                             53 cr.

 

Science Core:

**ESS205   

  Human Anatomy   

3

**ESS206

  Human Physiology   

3

   ESS207

  Human Motor Behavior

3

   ESS302

  Physiology of Exercise   

2

   ESS303 

  Biomechanics 

2 

 

Teacher Preparation Core:

ESS

112   

  Fundamentals of Movement   

2

ESS   

115   

  Orientation to Exercise and Sport Science   

2

ESS   

201   

  Safety, First Aid and CPR   

1

ESS   

225   

  Management and Instruction in Physical Education   

2

ESS   

226   

  Clinical Experience in Teaching Physical Education I   

1

ESS 

312   

  Adventure Theory for Physical Educators   

2

ESS   

321   

  Evaluation in Health and Physical Education   

2

ESS   

326   

  Clinical Experience in Teaching Physical Education II   

2

ESS   

412   

  Issues and Philosophies in Teaching Physical Education   

3

ESS   

422   

  Teaching Health-Related Fitness   

4

ESS   

424   

  Curriculum Development and Administration of Elementary/Secondary Physical Education  Programs   

4

   

 

Activity Core:

ESS   

113   

  Basic Swimming (see note p. 159)   

1

ESS   

120   

Outdoor Activities in Physical Education   

2

ESS   

258   

Team Sports   

3

ESS   

261   

Developmental Gymnastics   

1

ESS   

367   

Individual Sports   

4

ESS   

401   

Dance   

2

ESS   

402   

Advanced Activities   

1

ESS   

   

Aquatics Requirement (see note p. 157)   

2

 

Requirements in Education:                                                                              16 Cr.

C-I   

323   

  Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education   

2

C-I   

325   

  Methods of Teaching Middle/Secondary Physical Education   

2  

C-I   

403   

  Student Teaching   

12

 

 

 
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Statutory and Administrative Code Requirements:                                        15-18 Cr.

* ERS   

100   

  Introduction to Minority Cultures in the United States   

3

   

   

   or

* HIS   

306   

  History of Ethnic America   

3  

   

   

   or

* SOC   

225   

  Racial and Ethnic Minorities   

3

   

   

   or

* W-S   

230   

  Women’s Diversity: Race, Class and Culture   

3

* C-S   

101   

  Introduction to Computing   

4

   

   

   or

EDM   

275

  Microcomputers and Educational Applications 

1

   

   

   or

HED/ESS   

   

 Approved computer workshop   

1-3

PSY   

370

 Educational Psychology

3

ESS   

231

  Introduction to Special Physical Education       

3

***RDG   

330  

Reading in Performance Based Content Areas   

2

* EFN   

205   

  Understanding Human Differences   

3

 

Note: BIO 103* or 105* and PSY 100* are prerequisites for the exercise and sport

science major — physical education teacher certification emphasis. These courses will also fulfill General Education  requirements.

 

All incoming freshmen wishing to major in exercise and sport science — physical education teacher certification must enroll in ESS 112, 115 and 120 during their first

year at UW-L.

 

Students must be admitted to teacher education and have earned and maintained an overall grade point average of at least 2.50 in order to enroll in the professional teacher education core courses and students must earn and maintain a grade point average of at least 2.75 overall and in their major, minor, concentration and professional course work to gain admission to student teaching and 3.00 for a teaching internship. (See p. 69.)

 

Athletic Training Major

Students in the athletic training major receive an educational foundation in the science areas of exercise and sport science/athletic training and practical experience in the athletic training laboratories. Graduates of the program are eligible to seek NATA-BOC certification and are prepared to work in a variety of sports medicine settings.

 

Students who desire to major in athletic training must apply for candidacy for entrance into the athletic training program. Final selection for entrance into the CAAHEP-accredited program is limited. Applicants must meet selection and retention criteria as outlined on p. 157 and meet the technical standards for admission to the athletic training educational program as published on the program web page (uwlax.edu/hper/ess/at) and student athletic trainer handbook. This is a competitive process and not all who apply will be accepted. Application materials may be obtained from the director of the athletic training program.

 

 

 
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Requirements in Athletic Training Major                                                                62 cr.

 

ESS   

181   

  Introduction to Sports Medicine   

3  

ESS   

201   

  Safety, First Aid and CPR   

1

**ESS   

205   

   Human Anatomy   

3

**ESS   

206   

   Human Physiology   

3

ESS   

207   

  Human Motor Behavior   

3

ESS   

282   

  Sports Medicine Laboratory I   

3

ESS   

302   

  Physiology of Exercise   

2

ESS   

303   

  Biomechanics   

2

ESS   

349   

  Psychology of Coaching   

2

ESS   

378   

  Athletic Injury Assessment Techniques —Lower Extremity   

3   

ESS   

379   

  Athletic Injury Assessment Techniques —  Upper Extremity   

3   

ESS   

382   

  Sports Medicine Laboratory II   

3

ESS   

450   

  Exercise and Sport Science Internship   

8

ESS   

481   

  Therapeutic Principles of Rehabilitation in Athletic Training   

3  

ESS   

482   

  Sports Medicine Laboratory III   

3  

ESS   

483   

  Administration of Athletic Training Programs   

3

ESS   

484   

  Rehabilitation Techniques for Athletic Injuries   

3

ESS   

485   

  Current Readings & Research in Athletic Training   

3  

 

Interdisciplinary Requirements:

* HPR

105

  Creating a Healthy, Active Lifestyle 

3

HED

230   

  Nutrition for Fitness and Health 

2

PSY

212   

  Life Span Development 

3

 

 

Note:

Athletic training majors are required to take BIO 103* or 105*, MTH 205* or 250*, and PHY 104 to meet prerequisites for advanced courses.

 

Exercise and Sport Science Major with Fitness Emphasis

 

Students in fitness are prepared to assume positions requiring expertise in fitness  testing/assessment, program design, and instruction in a wide variety of fitness related programs. Courses in health, exercise and sport science, gerontology, and business administration strengthen graduates’ professional preparation.

 

Students who desire to major in fitness may apply to the program after completing (or be in the process of completing) 45 semester credits, including five pre-admission core courses. Final selection for entrance into the fitness emphasis is limited. Students must meet selection and retention criteria, complete a semester internship and satisfy complete a semester internship and satisfy the requirements listed on p. 158.

 

 

Requirements in Exercise and Sport Science Major with

Fitness Emphasis                                                                               60 cr.

 

 

ESS 

115   

  Orientation to Exercise and Sport Science

2

ESS 

201   

  Safety, First Aid and CPR

1

**ESS 

205   

  Human Anatomy 

3

**ESS  

206   

  Human Physiology

3

ESS   

281   

  Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 

2

ESS   

302   

  Physiology of Exercise 

2

ESS   

303   

  Biomechanics 

2

ESS   

320   

  Field Experience in Fitness/Sports Management

3

ESS   

323   

  Nutrition and Sport   

2

ESS   

344   

  Introduction to Fitness Assessment

3

ESS   

355   

  Methods of Exercise Leadership

3

ESS   

368   

  Strength Training Techniques and Programs

2

ESS   

410   

  Legal Implications of Sport and Activity   

2

ESS 

442   

  Aging and Physical Activity

2

ESS  

443   

  Youth and Family Fitness

3

ESS  

447   

  Administration in Fitness and Sport

3

ESS  

449   

  Seminar: Fitness/Sports Management

1

ESS 

450   

  Internship

12

 

 

 
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Interdisciplinary Requirements:

MKT

309   

  Principles of Marketing

3

CST 

260   

  Professional Communication  

3

   

   

   or

MGT

300   

  Business Communications

3

 

Electives: (3 credits required)

ESS 

100   

  Lifeguard Training  

1

ESS  

100   

  Aerobic Dance  

1

ESS  

100   

  Jogging and Fitness  

1

ESS  

100   

  Cross Country Skiing  

1

ESS  

100   

  Swim Fitness  

1

ESS  

100   

  Water Exercise  

1

ESS  

100   

  Tennis  

1

ESS  

100   

  Fitness Walking   

1

ESS  

100   

  Golf  

1

ESS  

100   

  In-Line Skating 

1

ESS  

100   

  Cycling  

1

ESS  

116   

  WSI  

2

HED   

342   

  Health Promotion and Wellness Methods  

2

HED   

354   

  Stress Management and Relaxation Skills  

1

HED   

433   

  Alcohol, Health and Behavior  

1

HED   

452   

  Health Aspects of Aging  

3

HED   

454   

  Teaching Stress Management and Relaxation Skills 

1

HED   

456   

  Biofeedback, Meditation and Your Health  

1

MGT   

205   

  The Legal Environment of Business   

3

MGT   

308   

  Behavior & Theory in Organizations 

3

MGT   

385   

  Human Resources: Employment  

3

MKT

365

   Promotion 

3

MKT

444 

   Sports and Recreation Marketing  

3

 

Workshops:

In addition to the above elective courses, a maximum of three credits of approved workshops may be applicable to the Fitness Emphasis.

 

Note:

            Exercise and sport science majors with fitness emphasis are required to take

BIO 103 or 105 and C-S 101 to meet prerequisites for advanced courses and/or for admission to the emphasis. These courses will also fulfill General Education

requirements.

 

 

 
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Exercise and Sport Science Major with Sport Management Emphasis

 

Students in sport management become highly trained managers who find success in complex and varied sports settings. The program incorporates a broad base of course work in many disciplines, including exercise and sport science, business and communication skills.

 

Students who desire to major in sport management must apply to the program after completing (or be in the process of completing) 45 semester credits, including five pre-admission core courses. Final selection for entrance into the sport  management emphasis is limited. Students must meet selection and retention criteria, complete a semester internship and satisfy the requirements listed on p. 158.

 

 

Requirements in Exercise and Sport Science Major with

  Sport Management Emphasis                                                                      58 Cr.

 

ESS 

115   

  Orientation to Exercise and Sport Science   

2

ESS 

201   

  Safety, First Aid and CPR  

1

**ESS 

205   

   Human Anatomy 

3

**ESS 

206   

   Human Physiology 

3

ESS 

302   

  Physiology of Exercise  

2

ESS

303   

  Biomechanics 

2

ESS 

320   

  Field Experience in Fitness/Sport Management  

3

ESS

410   

  Legal Implications of Sport and Activity   

2

ES

445   

  Planning Facilities for Physical Activity & Sport  

3

ESS

447   

  Administration in Fitness and Sport   

3

ESS

448   

  Promotion and Development of Fitness & Sports Programs   

2

ESS

449   

  Seminar: Fitness/ Sport Management   

1

ESS

450   

  Internship   

12

 

Interdisciplinary Requirements:

ACC

221

Financial Accounting Principles

3

MKT

309  

Principles of Marketing

3

MKT 

444 

Sports and Recreation Marketing 

3

MGT

300 

Business Communications 

3

   

  

or  

  

CST   

  260 

Professional Communication  

3

   

  

or  

  

ENG 

307  

Writing for Management, Public Relations and the Professions

3

MGT

308 

Behavior & Theory in Organizations  

3

 

Electives: (4 credits required)

ESS 

281   

  Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 

2

ESS 

323   

  Nutrition and Sport  

2

ESS 

349   

  Psychology of Coaching Competitive Athletics  

2

ESS 

368   

  Strength Training Techniques and Programs   

2

ESS 

442   

  Aging and Physical Activity   

2

ECO   

320   

  Economics of Sport and Entertainment  

3

HED   

354   

  Stress Management and Relaxation Skills   

1

HED   

452   

  Health Aspects of Aging   

3

HED   

454   

  Teaching Stress Management and Relaxation Skills   

1 

FIN 

355   

  Principles of Financial Management  

3

MGT   

205   

  The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business 

3

MGT   

305   

  Business Law   

3

MGT   

385   

  Human Resources: Employment   

3

MKT 

365   

  Promotion

3

REC 

305   

  Operation and Management of Swimming Pools and Spas  

2   

   

 

 
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Workshops:

In addition to the above electives, a maximum of three credits of approved workshops may be applicable to the sport management emphasis.

 

Note:  

            Exercise and sport science majors with sport management emphasis are required

            to take BIO 103 or 105; C-S 101; and ECO    110 to meet prerequisites for advanced courses and/or for admission to the emphasis. These courses will also fulfill General Education requirements.

 

 

RECREATION MANAGEMENT AND THERAPEUTIC RECREATION

 

This undergraduate curriculum prepares students for professional recreation positions. Two majors are offered: recreation management and therapeutic recreation. A recreation minor is also offered. Other majors and minors for recreation students are available upon adviser’s approval.

 

Note:

Students enrolled in either of the two recreation majors must earn a grade of  “C” or better in all required recreation (REC and RTH) courses listed in the prescribed programs.

 

Recreation Management —

Students are prepared to assume positions of responsibility within a wide range of commercial, tourism, governmental, and not-for-profit recreation and parks agencies where supervision or administration may be combined with program planning or leadership responsibilities. The recreation management curriculum prepares individuals for positions at a middle management or supervisory level. All students majoring in recreation management must complete a full semester internship at an approved agency. All majors, prior to enrollment in REC 449, also must complete the 25-hour underclass pre-professional experience requirement and the junior-level 50-hour experience requirement. These are non-class field experiences at recreation management agencies.

 

Therapeutic Recreation —

Students are prepared to assume positions as therapeutic recreation specialists. These professionals provide treatment, leisure education, and recreation participation

programs for persons with illnesses, disabilities, or special needs. All students majoring in therapeutic recreation must complete a full semester internship at an approved agency.

 

Recreation Management Major (REC)

 

Requirements for Major in Recreation Management                               53 crs.

(Must earn a grade of “C” or better in all REC/RTH courses

required for major.)

 

REC 

100   

  Foundations of Recreation 

3

REC 

200   

  Program Leadership of Recreation Activities

3

REC 

300   

  Program Planning in Recreation  

3

REC 

302   

  Recreation Leadership and Supervision

3

REC

304   

  Maintenance of Park and Outdoor Recreation Areas 

3

REC

305   

  Operation and Management of Swimming Pools and Spas

2 

REC

320   

  Enterprises in Commercial Recreation and Tourism  

3 

RTH

325   

  Recreation for Persons with Special Needs  

2

REC 

340   

  Evaluation Methods and Practices  

3

REC 

400   

  Planning for Park and Recreation Facilities   

3

REC 

401   

  Management in Park and Recreation Resources   

3

REC 

402   

  Risk Management in Leisure Service Organizations

3

REC

420   

  Commercial Recreation Management   

3

REC 

449   

  Internship/Professional Preparation 

1

REC

450   

  Internship 

12

(See prerequisites on p. 247.)

 

 

 
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Electives: 3 credits required: Choose from REC 202, 375, 380, 381; RTH 474.

 

Interdisciplinary Requirements:

* C-S

101  

Introduction to Computing 

4

* POL

102 

State and Local Government

3

ENG 

307   

  Writing for Management, Public Relations and the Professions

3

PSY

212   

  Life-Span Development   

3

ACC 

221   

  Financial Accounting Principles 

3

   

   

   or

ACC

235   

  Introduction to Fund Accounting

3

* ECO

110   

  Microeconomics and Public Policy

3

* GEO

200   

  Conservation of Global Environments

3

   

   

   or

GEO   

324   

  Conservation of Natural Resources

3

   

   

   or

* ENV

201   

  Introduction to Environmental Studies

3

* MTH

205   

  Elementary Statistics

4

   

   

   or

* MTH

250   

  Statistics 

3

 

 

Therapeutic Recreation Major (RTH)

 

Pre-professional core requirements                                                                              38-39 crs.

* BIO 

103   

  Introductory Biology 

4

   

   

   or

* BIO

105   

  General Biology  

4

* C-S

101   

  Introduction to Computing   

4

* CST

110   

  Essentials of Speech Communication   

3

* ENG

110   

  College Writing I   

3

* MTH

205   

  Elementary Statistics 

4

   

   

   or

* MTH

250   

  Statistics 

3

* PSY

100   

  General Psychology 

3

ESS

205   

  Human Anatomy 

3

PSY

212   

  Life-Span Development 

3

REC

100   

  Foundations of Recreation

3

REC

200   

  Program Leadership of Recreation Activities

3

RTH 

250   

  Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation 

3

RTH

326   

  Therapeutic Recreation Populations I

3

   

   

   or

RTH

327   

  Therapeutic Recreation Populations II 

3

 

 

 
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Professional core requirements                                                                                    48-54 crs.

PSY 

304   

  Abnormal Psychology  

3

PSY 

343   

  Group Dynamics  

3

REC

302   

  Recreation Leadership and Supervision

3

RTH

326   

  Therapeutic Recreation Populations I

3

RTH

327   

  Therapeutic Recreation Populations II

3

(whichever was not completed for pre-professional

requirement)

RTH

355   

  Medical Language  

3

RTH

452   

 or 203 or 204 

2-3

RTH

456   

  Program Design & Administration of Therapeutic Recreation

3

RTH

462   

  Inclusive Recreation Program Administration

2-3

RTH

470   

  Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation

4

RTH

476   

  Assessment and Treatment Planning in Therapeutic Recreation

3

RTH

480   

  Leisure Education 

3

RTH

493   

  Therapeutic Recreation Trends and Issues 

3

RTH

496   

  Orientation to Internship in Therapeutic Recreation

1

RTH 

498   

  Internship in Therapeutic Recreation  

12 or 16

 

 

Electives — 5-6 crs.

One course must be in RTH; choose from ESS 430, 442, HED 333, 342, 445, 452, PHL 339, PSY 310, 311, 312, 330, 401, 417, 426, REC 430, SOC 321, 322, 325, 420, 422, 429, RTH 330, 332, 333, 345, 474, 483, 490, 491. (Approval from the therapeutic recreation director should be received prior to enrollment in RTH 491.)

 

A.        Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.50 or greater to enter the program.

 

B.         Students should obtain a therapeutic recreation faculty adviser as early as possible while taking pre-preprofessional courses.

 

C.        Before enrolling in professional courses for the therapeutic recreation major, the

following minimum requirements must be met:

1.      All pre-professional course requirements must be completed with a grade of  “C” or better;

               2.      Cumulative GPA of at least 2.50;

3.      50 hours of pre-professional volunteer therapeutic recreation experience must be documented.

D.        Therapeutic recreation majors must pass all required professional core courses and required electives with a grade of “C” or better.

 

E.         Appropriate RTH 490 or 491 workshops will apply. Approval from the therapeutic recreation director must be received prior to enrollment.


F.             Transfer students with associate degrees should consult the therapeutic recreation program director to ensure             fulfillment of requirements.

 

 

 

 
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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION (SOE)

 

Director — Ron Rochon (Interim)

Assistant to the Dean — Sandra Keller

220 Thomas Morris Hall; (608)785-8122

www.uwlax.edu/hper/soe/

 

 

Departments/Units

 

Educational Studies

College Student Development and Administration

 

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Science

Master of Science in Education

Master of Education-Professional Development

 

Certifiable Majors and Minors

            Elementary 1-6 Major

            Elementary/Middle 1-9 Major

            K-12 Majors:

                        Art

                        Music-Instrumental

                        Music-General

            Middle/Secondary 6-12 Majors:

*          Biology

            Broadfield Social Studies

*          Chemistry

*          Computer Science

*          English

*          French

*          Geography

*          German Studies

            General Science (Broadfield)

*          History

*          Mathematics

            Music-Choral Emphasis

*          Physics

*          Political Science

*          Sociology

*          Spanish

 

 
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Minors (only):

Anthropology (Broadfield Social Studies only)

Early Childhood (1-6 only) See p. 71.

Earth Science

Economics (Broadfield Social Studies only)

General Science (1-9 only) See p. 71.

Health Education

Instructional Media (K-12) See p. 72.

Psychology (Broadfield Social Studies only)

Social Studies (1-6; 1-9 only) See p. 72.

Special Education (1-6; 1-9 only) See p. 71.

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages See p. 169.

 

 

The School of Education (SOE) provides leadership in teacher education for the

university as a whole and collaborates with area schools and the community. SOE programs prepare students to teach at the pre-kindergarten through high school levels and also prepare educators for specialists positions in pre-kindergarten through high school. This preparation includes an array of course offerings in General Education, a content specialty major or minor, and a professional core of courses emphasizing methodology and foundations of teaching and learning. Teacher education candidates are engaged in consideration of common values held by the teaching profession, including respect for the dignity and autonomy of the learner and the commitment of schools to prepare citizens for life in a democratic society. Teacher candidates are involved in a series of clinical experiences that provide an understanding of children, youth, and other learners in the development of teaching skills. The major goal of teacher education is to prepare professionals for the schools of an ever-changing society.

 

School of Education programs are designed around the following conceptual framework: teachers and other education professionals exiting UW-L programs should be thoughtful 1) learners, 2) leaders, 3) inquirers, and 4) community members.

 

Accreditation

UW-L teacher education programs are accredited by the North Central Association and approved by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. UW-L teacher education programs also have the distinction of being accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

 

School of Education Resources

Several resources for education students, university faculty, and area teachers are provided through the School of Education. The Alice Hagar Curriculum Resource Center, which contains many teacher education materials and references for teaching all grade levels, is located on the upper floor of Murphy Library. The Center for Cultural Diversity and Community Renewal was created in response to our commitment to the value of diversity and the need to recruit and retain students of color in teacher education programs. The Center is working to establish positive relationships with communities of color in La Crosse and Milwaukee and to encourage their young people to come to UW-La Crosse to pursue a career in teacher education. The Center for Economic Education promotes economic education in the K-12 curriculum through teacher in-services, staff training, consultation, course work, conferences and a teacher resource center located in the Alice Hagar Curriculum Center. The Rhea Pederson Reading Center, 335 Morris Hall, provides reading resources for UW-L students and area teachers and offers tutoring services in literacy for children from area schools. The NASA Educator Resource Center, located in 140 Morris Hall, serves primarily as a regional distribution site for a comprehensive collection of NASA Program developed teaching materials. It also houses a collection of reference materials for planning environmental and science education instruction. These NASA instructional materials are made available for minimal or no cost to teachers by the sponsorship of the NASA-Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. The NASA Educator Resource Center also assists and supports the offering of environmental education and science teaching workshops and courses. The Reading Evaluation and Development (READ) Clinic, located in the Health Sciences Center, is a collaborative effort of the La Crosse Medical Health Science Consortium, Inc. and is directed by a member of the SOE Reading faculty. The READ Clinic provides assessment and tutoring in reading to children and adolescents in the region.

 
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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

 

Licensure is available in the following areas:

        Elementary Licensure for Grades 1-6

            (available for students completing program before August 31, 2004)

        Prekindergarten-Kindergarten with 1-6 (after August 31, 2004, Early Childhood through Middle Childhood licensure)

        Elementary/Middle Level Licensure for Grades 1-9 (after August 31, 2004, Middle Childhood through Early Adolescence licensure)

        Middle Level/Secondary Licensure for Grades 6-12 (after August 31, 2004, Early Adolescence through Adolescence licensure)

        K-12 Licensure in Art, Educational Media, English as a Second Language and Music (after August 31, 2004, Early Childhood through Adolescence licensure)

 

 

Admission to Teacher Education

In order to enroll in the professional portion of the K-12, school health, or physical education programs, all students must be admitted to teacher education. The number of students admitted is limited by resources available. Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. School health education and physical education students must meet requirements tailored to those majors. See the academic assistant to the dean (125 Mitchell Hall) for the applications and additional information.

 

 

Note:

Any student who has been convicted of a criminal offense must contact the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) to discuss eligibility for teacher licensure. A copy of the DPI Conduct and Competency Code is available in the Office of the Director in Morris Hall.

 

Eligibility Criteria

Prior to filing for admission to teacher education, SOE students must meet the following criteria:

1.  Pre-Professional Skills Test. The PPST examination is to be taken during the first semester on campus. Students must earn passing scores in mathematics (173), reading (175), and writing (174) on the PPST to be eligible for program admission. Passing scores are set by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

2.  Preliminary course work. SOE students must complete 40 semester credits of General Education courses (30 credits for music education students) before applying to the teacher education program. These 40 credits must include the following: ENG 110, CST 110, EFN 205. Students also must complete PSY 212, which is not a general education course.

3.  Communication proficiency. Students must complete both ENG 110 and CST 110 with a minimum grade of “B.” Students who fail to meet this grade requirement must earn a “C” or better in another 300-level writing or public speaking course prior to application for student teaching. (The General Education program states that students receiving less than a grade of “C” in CST 110 must repeat that course.)

4.  Grade point. Students must have earned a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all academic work taken prior to entering the teacher education program. (This would include transfer grade points averaged with residence grade points when applicable.)

5.  Required introductory education courses.

A.     EFN 210. Minimum grade of “C.” Passing the PPST and a minimum GPA of

      2.75 are prerequisites for EFN 210 and C-I 211.

B.     C-I 211. At the completion of C-I 211, the student must pass the course and

      have a recommendation to continue in the program from the Clinical Faculty

      Review Committee.

C.     In addition, a portfolio, initiated in EFN 210/C-I 211 should be submitted. The

      portfolio includes documentation of experiences with education, children, and

      community service.

 

 
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Application to Teacher Education

Students who meet the criteria described above may obtain an application form in 220 Morris Hall. Students must be accepted into the program prior to registration for certain education courses. Applications must be submitted by August 15 and January 15. August 15 applicants approved will be permitted to take courses requiring admission during the following spring semester; January 15 applicants approved will be permitted to take courses requiring admission during the following fall semester.

 

Applications must be accompanied by a personal statement, a professional growth paper from EFN 210/C-I 211, a current transcript, (second degree candidates only), PPST scores, clinical experiences, evaluations, and a letter of recommendation from someone who has knowledge of the applicant’s potential to be an effective educator.

 

Retention in Teacher Education

Students may be retained in the Teacher Education Program as long as they maintain a 2.75 GPA (3.00 for graduate students), retain proficiency in oral and written communication, and are otherwise in good standing with the university and the School of Education.

 

Admission to Student Teaching

The student teaching experience is generally completed during the final semester in

residence. Applications for student teaching may be obtained in the Student Teaching Office, 220 Morris Hall. Completed applications must be returned to that office by early February for a fall semester placement, or by early October for a spring semester placement. Students teach for a full semester, as calculated according to the calendar of the cooperating school. Most cooperating schools are located approximately within a 40-mile radius of La Crosse, though students may apply to teach in the Milwaukee public school system.

To be eligible for student teaching, students must:

1.         Have and maintain a 2.75 cumulative grade point average as well as a 2.75

            in major, minor, concentration, and professional sequence;

2.         Meet prerequisites specified for C-I 400, C-I 401, C-I 403, or C-I 409;

3.         Declare the major(s), minor(s), and/or concentrations for which they are

            seeking certification at the time of admission to student teaching.

 

Internships

Qualified students may apply for an internship rather than a traditional student teaching assignment. To be eligible to apply, students must be formally admitted to teacher education, and must possess and maintain through graduation, a cumulative grade point average of 3.00. Interns are assigned for an entire semester to schools that are part of the Wisconsin Improvement Program. The Intern Selection Committee admits students to the internship program. Applications for internships may be obtained in Morris Hall. The completed application is due in that office by early February for placement during the fall or spring semester of the subsequent year.

 

Certification to Teach

Students must maintain a 2.75 cumulative grade point average and 2.75 in all certifiable majors and minors, concentrations and professional education courses. Exit exams may be required in certifiable areas.

 

Students who complete all university requirements and all teacher education requirements for student teaching/internship, but who fail to successfully complete the 15 credit student teaching/internship experience, may be awarded a degree in elementary education, physical education teaching, school health education, or secondary education. This degree will not earn Department of Public Instruction endorsement for licensure.  (See an academic assistant to the Dean for details.)

Background Screening

Applicants to field experiences in the School of Education are screened for physical, mental, and criminal histories which might lead to non-acceptance into programs, courses, and/or fieldwork. Having a history in these areas does not automatically deny admission to the program. Before issuing a teaching license, the State of Wisconsin conducts a criminal background check through the FBI.

 

Background checks are conducted at each level of clinical field experience and a CIB check will be conducted prior to student teaching. Students will pay the cost of the CIB at the Cashier’s Office prior to student teaching. Copies of the background check will be kept in the student’s file and on file at the clinical site if required. Questions concerning criminal background checks should be directed to the Office of Student Teaching and Field Experiences.

 

 
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Wisconsin Application

Graduates desiring license to teach in Wisconsin may obtain the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction’s License Application (Form PI-1602) from Morris Hall. Upon completion of all items appropriate to the certification desired, the application and a $100.00 check payable to the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction should be returned to Morris Hall. When all certification requirements are satisfactorily completed, the certification officer will endorse the application and forward it for approval to the State Department of Public Instruction.

 

Out-of-State Applications

We recommend that graduates seeking certification in other states request application forms and instructions from the Department of Education of the state in which certification is desired. Students should seek such information early in the professional preparation program. Most states will require institutional endorsement as Wisconsin does.

 

Statutory Requirements:

Conservation and Cooperatives

 

Conservation — Instruction in the conservation of natural resources is required by statute for all teachers of physical and biological science, as well as for all teachers of social studies. The major and minor course listings for prospective teachers in these fields include a statement apprising candidates of this requirement.

 

Cooperatives — The statutes of the State of Wisconsin require that instruction in cooperative marketing and consumers’ cooperatives be included in the preparation of social studies teachers, who are also required to have instruction in the conservation of natural resources. The major and minor course listings for prospective social studies teachers include a statement apprising candidates of these statutory requirements.

 

 

Administrative Code Requirements:

 

Human Relations — All prospective teachers are required to have educational experience in the areas of “Human Relations” in order to be certified to teach in the State of Wisconsin.

 

Reading — All prospective teachers applying for initial certification will complete the prescribed reading requirement to be certified to teach in the State of Wisconsin.

 

Environmental Education — Instruction in environmental education is required of all teachers of science and social studies at the secondary level plus all teachers of elementary education.

 

Exceptional Education — To be eligible for a license to teach in Wisconsin’s elementary and secondary schools, persons shall have completed a course(s) consisting of a minimum of three semester credits or its equivalent in exceptional education.

 

Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science (required for students completing a 1-6 or 1-9 program before August 31, 2004)  — To be eligible for a license to teach at the elementary or elementary/middle level, persons must have completed at least 12 semester credits in each of the following: mathematics, social studies, and science. Completing General Education and education major requirements in mathematics, social studies, and science at UW-La Crosse is suggested in meeting this requirement. Students planning to transfer courses in these areas should consult a School of Education adviser.

 

Standardized Examination — A passing score on the Pre-Professional Skills Test in mathematics, reading, and writing is required of all students in teacher preparation programs. The passing score is determined by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

 

 
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NOTICE

Students should be aware that the Department of Public Instruction is specific in its requirements about the content of both general education and professional education; therefore, prospective teacher education candidates should work closely with an adviser from the outset of their studies at the university. Completion of Department of Public Instruction requirements for licensure may take longer than four academic years.

 

Conflict Resolution — Applicants for the Wisconsin teaching license shall demonstrate competency in: 1) resolving conflicts between pupils and between pupils and school staff;

2) assisting pupils in learning methods of resolving conflicts between pupils and between pupils and school staff, including training in the use of peer mediation to resolve conflicts between pupils; and  3) dealing with crises, including violent, disruptive, potentially violent or potentially disruptive situations, that may arise in school or at activities supervised by a school as a result of conflicts between pupils or between pupils and other persons.

NOTICE

Licensing rules will be changing for students completing a teacher education program after August 31, 2004. Students will need to consult with a faculty adviser for updated information.

 

 

ELEMENTARY LICENSURE FOR GRADES 1-6

(After August 31, 2004, Early Childhood through Middle Childhood; will require elementary major plus early childhood minor.)

 

By completing the following requirements, plus a certifiable minor, students may be certified to teach in grades 1-6.

 

Requirements in General Education

Students are required to take specific courses from General Education in order to meet Department of Public Instruction’s standards for licensure and to meet administrative code requirements for training in the areas of human relations, environmental education, and conservation. General Education check sheets listing required courses are available in Morris Hall. The two-year transfer policy does not exempt students from these

requirements.

 

 
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Requirements in Professional Education — 44 credits

Final admission to teacher education is required for enrollment in most professional education courses. Applications for admission may be obtained in Morris Hall.

 

                Credits

EFN 

210

Introduction to Education 

2

C-I  

211 

Level I Clinical Experience   

1

C-I 

301

Methods in Music: Elementary  

2

EFN

303

Foundations of Public Education in the United States 

2

C-I

302/502   

  Level II Clinical Experience 

1

C-I 

334/534

Curriculum and Methods in the Language Arts   

3

C-I 

354/554

Curriculum and Methods in Mathematics 

3

RDG 

324/524

Elementary Level Reading  

3

HED   

307   

Health Education in the Elementary School   

3

EDM/ENG 

310/510

Children’s Lit.  

3

C-I 

313  

Methods and Practices in Art: Elementary 

2

EDM   

317

Educational Media   

1

EDM   

318

Educational Media: Materials Production 

1

RDG 

432/632   

Middle Level Reading

3

ESS 

327  

Physical Education for the Elementary Classroom Teacher 

2

C-I  

335/535 

Curriculum and Methods in Elementary/Middle Science   

3

C-I 

336/536  

Curriculum and Methods in the Social Studies   

3

C-I

381/581

Environmental Education Methods

1

SPE

401/501    

Learners with Exceptional Needs and Abilities in the Regular Classroom 

3

C-I 

445/645

Refining Teaching Skills/ Level III Clinical Experience   

2

                           

 

Requirements in Allied Fields — 10 credits

MTH

125   

  Mathematics for Elementary Teachers  

4

PSY  

212   

  Life-Span Development  

3

PSY 

370    

  Educational Psychology  

3


Student Teaching — 15 credits

C-I       409      Student Teaching: Elementary                                                15

                                    or

C-I       404      Teaching Internship                                                                15

 

Minor Requirements

Students completing an elementary or elementary/middle major prior to August 31, 2004, must complete a certifiable minor. See p. 67 for applicable minors.

 

 

NOTICE

Licensing rules will be changing for students completing a teacher education program after August 31, 2004. Students will need to consult with a faculty adviser for updated information.

 

 

 
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ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE LEVEL LICENSURE FOR GRADES 1-9

(After August 31, 2004, Middle Childhood through Early Adolescence)

 

All of the requirements for General Education, professional education, allied fields, student teaching, and completion of  a minor pertain to the student seeking licensure for grades 1-9. Additional requirements for the middle level licensure include the following:

 

EFN     460      Middle Level Education                                                3

 

 

MINORS IN THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

 

Special Education Minor — Students majoring in elementary (1-6) or elementary/ middle (1-9) education who wish to add special education as an area of competency may choose from three options. Option 1 is designed to increase the student’s competence for teaching students who are difficult to teach and may be identified as exceptional in regular education settings. Option 1 does not lead to certification to teach students who are identified as exceptional.  Students who select this option complete the courses listed in Option 1 below.

Option 1 —

Teaching Exceptional Students in Regular Education Setting                                                                22 credits

*SPE  

417   

Understanding Emotional Disturbance:Educational  Perspectives  

 3  

   

   

   or

*SPE     

420/520

Learning Disabilities Theory, Assessment and Intervention   

3   

 SPE  

418/518   

Mental Retardation 

3

 SPE  

424/524

Classroom and Behavior Management   

  3  

 SPE  

425/525

Psychological Principles for Teaching Children with Learning and Behavior Problems 

3

 SPE 

431/531

Language Development and Disorders

3   

 SPE  

440/540 

Collaboration with Parents, Community Agencies & Teachers 

2

 SPE 

445/545    

Relating K-12 Schooling to Life: Careers, Work and Community Living

2

 SPE

490/590 

Teaching Exceptional Children and Youth: Section 4, Field Placement 

1 

 RDG   

426 

Teaching Children with Reading Difficulties 

2

 

Students seeking certification to teach students who are identified as exceptional may apply for admission to Option 2, which leads to certification to teach students identified as Emotionally Disturbed, or Option 3, which leads to certification to teach students identified as Learning Disabled.

 

* Students anticipating seeking ED or LD licensure should take the appropriate course.

 

 
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Note:

            Admission into Options 2 and 3 is competitive and is based on performance

            in clinicals and field experience, at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA, portfolio review,

            and an interview. Students must have completed 13 credits of SPE courses

            prior to applying for admission. Specific requirements are available from the

            program director.

 

Option 2 —

Certification in Emotional Disturbance

(10 additional credits). Complete courses in Option 1 (choose SPE 417).

SPE 

428/528   

   Emotional Disturbance: Educational Assessment and Intervention  

3  

SPE 

430/530   

   Seminar in Professional Practices in Special Education 

1 

SPE 

452/552   

   Individual Educational Assessment    

3

SPE

481   

   Student Teaching: Emotional Disturbance

3


Option 3 —

Certification in Learning Disabilities

(10 additional credits). Complete courses in Option 1 (choose SPE 420/520).

SPE 

430/530   

   Seminar in Professional Practices in Special Education 

1

SPE 

452/552   

   Individual Educational Assessment  

3

SPE 

453/553   

   Teaching Students with Learning Problems/Disabilities 

3

SPE 

482   

   Student Teaching: Learning Disabilities   

3

 

Early Childhood Education Minor: Prekindergarten and Kindergarten (Elementary level 1-6 only) — 34 credits

 

Students enrolled in the elementary education (grades 1-6) major may select the 22 credit early childhood education minor. Completion of the minor and 12 credits of student teaching in two early childhood settings will lead to certification to teach in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten classrooms.

 

ECE

213

Introduction to Early Childhood Education 

3

ECE

316/516

Administration of Early Childhood Programs 

2

ECE

322/522

Early Childhood Education: Infancy and Toddlerhood 

2

ECE

324/524

Early Childhood Education: Preschool  

3

ECE 

326/526

Early Childhood Education: Kindergarten  

3

ECE

327/527

Field Experience: Kindergarten 

1

ECE

400 

Student Teaching: Early Childhood    

2-4

ECE

401

Student Teaching: Kindergarten

4-8

ECE

430/530

Creative Experiences for Children: Art, Music, Drama 

3

ECE

440/540 

Language and Literacy Development of Young Children 

3

ECE

490/590

Seminar:Relationships with Children, Families and Professionals

2

   

 

 
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General Science Minor (Elementary/Middle Level Education 1-9) — 22-23 credits

 

In addition to the General Education required science courses of BIO 103 or 105 and ESC 101, the following courses must be completed:

 

PHY/AST

155

Solar System Astronomy   

4

*CHM 

100

Contemporary Chemistry 

4

C-I 

461/661   

Leadership for Elementary/Middle Science Education 

3

PHY 

103

General Physics  I  

4

   

   

   or

PHY 

203

General Physics  I

4

** Electives in Science 7-8

       

 

* CHM 103 and CHM 104 may be taken in lieu of CHM 100.

** Recommended Electives:

            PHY/AST 156, Stars and Galaxies (4 cr.)

            BIO 204: Plant Biology (4 cr.)

            BIO 303: Vertebrate Form and Function (4 cr.)

            BIO 307: Ecology (3 cr.)

            CHM 103: General Chemistry I (5 cr.)

            CHM 104: General Chemistry II (5 cr.)

            ESC 221: Introduction to Climate Systems (4 cr.)

            ESC 222: Landforms: Process and Regions (4 cr.)

            PHY 104: Fundamental Physics II (4 cr.)

                                                or

            PHY 204: General Physics II (4 cr.)

 

 

Social Studies Minor

Elementary or Elementary/Middle Level Education 1-9 — 22 credits

 

HIS 

220   

  The U.S. in the Global Community  

3

HIS

325   

  America in the Cold War 

3

HIS

321   

  Wisconsin History 

3

GEO

201   

  Geography of the United States and Canada 

3

   

   

   or

GEO

110   

  World Cultural Regions  

3

ARC

100   

  Archaeology: Discovering our Past 

3

   

   

   or

SOC

120   

  Social Problems.  

3

POL

340   

  The Making of American Foreign Policy 

3

   

   

   or

POL

202   

  Contemporary Global  Issues 

3

ECO

110   

  Microeconomics and Public Policy

3

   

   

   or

ECO 

120   

  Global Macroeconomics 

3

EFN  

200   

  Cooperatives 

1

 

 

 

 
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Instructional Media Minor for Elementary, Health Education,

Physical Education, or Middle/ Secondary Education — 27 credits

 

This minor is open to students in all schools and colleges in the university. It is designed

for persons preparing for positions in school media centers and other public and private libraries.

 

*EDM 

275   

Microcomputers and Educational Applications 

1   

EDM

301/501

Selection and Evaluation of Instructional Materials 

3  

EDM 

310/510

Children’s Literature 

3

EDM

315/515

Adolescent Literature 

3

EDM

317

Educational Media 

1

EDM

318

Educational Media–Materials Production 

1

EDM

335/535

Introduction to Cataloging and Classification 

3

EDM 

402/602

Instructional Technology 

3

EDM 

403/603

Library Media Practice 

3

EDM 

433/633

Administration of School Media Programs  

3

EDM 

461/661

General Reference

3

 

* C-S 101 or 224 may be taken in lieu of this course.

 

NOTICE

Licensing rules will be changing for students completing a teacher education program after August 31, 2004.  Students will need to consult with a faculty adviser for updated information.

 

 

Middle Level/Secondary Education Licensure for Grades 6-12 (after August 31, 2004, Early Adolescence through Adolescence level)

 

Students must fulfill the requirements below and one or more certifiable majors of

at least 34 credits to be licensed to teach in grades 6-12.

 

General Education Requirements

Students are required to take specific courses from General Education in order to meet Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction standards for licensure and administrative code requirements for the study of human relations, environmental education, conservation, and computer proficiency. General Education check sheets listing required courses are available in Morris Hall. The two-year transfer policy does not exempt students from these requirements.

 

 

 

 

 
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Requirements in Professional Education — 28-30 credits

 

Final admission to teacher education is required for enrollment in all courses except EDM 317, 318; EFN 200, 210, 303; C-I 211; PSY 212 and 370. Application for admission may be obtained in Morris Hall.

  

EFN 

210   

  Introduction to Education

2

C-I 

211   

  Level I Clinical Experience   

 1

EFN

303   

  Foundations of Public Education in the United States 

2  

C-I

304/504   

  Understanding the Context of Classroom Practice

4  

C-I

305/505   

  Clinical Experience II   

1

EDM   

317   

  Educational Media 

1

EDM   

318   

  Educational Media–Materials Production 

1

*RDG

328/528   

 Reading in the Content Areas 

3

*RDG 

432/632   

 Middle Level Reading   

3

SPE  401/501 Learners with Exceptional Needs and Abilities 3

C-I

450/650   

  Clinical Experience III 

1

EFN

460/560

Middle Level Education

3

C-I  

XXX   

Prescribed Methods in major(s)/minor(s)   

3

   

   

   (See next page for specific course)

EFN

200   

Cooperatives (All social studies majors/minors)

1  

C-I 

381/581   

  Environmental Education Methods (all social studies and science majors and minors) 

1

  

 

 

Requirements in Allied Fields — 6 credits

PSY     212      Life-Span Development                                                3

PSY     370      Educational Psychology                                                3

 

Student Teaching — 15 credits

C-I       403      Student Teaching                                                          15

                                    or

C-I       404      Teaching Internship                                                       15

 

* Music education, art education and physical education majors take RDG 330/530 only

   unless also completing an academic second major or academic minor.

 

 

NOTICE

Licensing rules will be changing for students completing a teacher education program after August 31, 2004. Students will need to consult with a faculty adviser for updated information.

 

 

  
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MIDDLE LEVEL/SECONDARY MAJORS (Available to students completing programs before August 31, 2004; students completing after that should consult an

academic adviser.)

 

Middle Level/Secondary Education students may be certified in any of the following majors, minors, and/or concentrations. Though not a requirement, election of a complementary minor(s) or an additional major is encouraged because of the demand for teachers who are certified in more than one academic discipline. Consult the index to locate complete descriptions of the requirements for the following majors and minors.

 

                                                Prescribed

Major/                                     Methods                              Additional

Minor                                      Course                                 Requirement*

 

Art (major only)

  Broadfield                              C-I 312

                                                 C-I 313

Biology                                     C-I 469                                   GEO 200

                                                                                                 C-I 381

Broadfield Social Studies (see following description)

Chemistry                                 C-I 469                                    GEO 200

                                                 C-I 381

Computer Science                    C-I 364

English                                     C-I 405

French                                      C-I 467

Spanish                                    C-I 467

Geography                               C-I 408                                    GEO 200

                                                                                                EFN 200

                                                                                                C-I 381

General Science (see following description)

 

German Studies                        C-I 467

History                                     C-I 408                                   GEO 200

                                                                                                EFN 200

                                                                                                C-I 381

 

Mathematics                             C-I 364

Choral Music (major only) (6-12)

                                                 C-I 306

General Music (major only) (K-12)

                                                 C-I 307, C-I 371

Instrumental Music (major only) (K-12)

                                                 C-I 308

Physics                                     C-I 469                                   GEO 200

                                                                                                C-I 381

Political                                   C-I 408                                    GEO 200

Science                                                                                    EFN 200

                                                                                                C-I 381

Sociology                                 C-I 408                                   GEO 200

                                                                                                EFN 200

                                                                                                C-I 381

 

 

 

  
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MIDDLE LEVEL/SECONDARY MINORS AND AREAS OF CONCENTRATION

 

Note:

            Students seeking certification in any of the following minors should consult the

            specific program requirements of the department offering those minors.

 

                                                Prescribed

Major/                                     Methods                              Additional

Minor                                      Course                                 Requirement*

 

Anthropology                           C-I 408                                   GEO 200

                                                                                                EFN 200

                                                                                                C-I 381

Coaching Competitive Athletics

(concentration only)

Earth Science                           C-I 469                                   GEO 200

                                                                                                C-I 381

Economics                               C-I 408                                   GEO 200

                                                                                                EFN 200

                                                                                                C-I 381

Teaching English to Speakers

      of Other Languages            C-I 467

School Health Education         C-I 412

Instructional Media

 Psychology                             C-I 408

 

 

NOTICE

Licensing rules will be changing for students completing a teacher education program after August 31, 2004. Students will need to consult with a faculty adviser for updated information.

 

 

 

 

  
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MIDDLE LEVELl/SECONDARY BROADFIELD MAJORS (Available to students completing programs before  August 31, 2004; students completing after that should consult an academic adviser.)

 

Students may elect a broadfield major in the area of science or social studies. These majors are not described under specific department headings because of their

interdisciplinary nature.

 

General Science —

1.         Students are required to complete a 54 semester credit major in science, including:

a.         one 22-24 credit minor in one of the following: biology, chemistry, earth science, physics

b.         14 semester credits in one additional science area;

c.         8 semester credits in each of the two remaining science areas;

d.         and if needed, 2-3 semester credits selected from any of the aforesaid sciences and/or history of science and/or philosophy of science and/or issues of science to total 54 credits.

2.         In addition to the 54 science credits required for this major, students must complete:

a.         two statutory or administrative code requirements: GEO 200 — Conservation of Global Environments, 3 credits or GEO 324 — Conservation of Natural Resources, 3 credits; and C-I 381 — Environmental Education Methods, 1 credit;

b.         and one mathematics course beyond General Education is required.

3.         In addition to C-I 469, Methods in Science, it is strongly advised that students take C-I 461, Leadership for Elementary/Middle Level Science Education.

 

Students will be licensed to teach in Wisconsin in science disciplines in which they have earned a minimum of 15 semester credits. Courses taken to satisfy this 15 credit block should be selected from courses recommended for the minor in that field.

 

For more detailed information on recommended courses, course combinations, and minor options within the broadfield sciences see the Middle Level/Secondary Program Director in Morris Hall.

 

Broadfield Social Studies —

54 to 56 credit hours distributed according to the following options:

 

Option A —

1.         34-36 credit major in geography, history, political science, or sociology;

2.         20 semester credits, with a minimum of three credits, from any two of the following areas: anthropology, economics, geography, history,  political science, psychology, or sociology;

3.         GEO 200         Conservation of Global Environments;

            EFN 200          Cooperatives;

            C-I 381            Environmental Education Methods

4.         In addition, students must complete C-I 408 Methods in History and

            Social Studies.

 

Option B —

1.         22-23 semester credit minor in one of the following: anthropology,

            economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, or

            sociology;

2.         32 semester credits with a minimum of three credits from three of the other subject areas;

3.         GEO 200  Conservation of Global Environments;

EFN 200          Cooperatives;

            C-I 381            Environmental Education Methods

  1. In addition, students must complete C-I 408 Methods in History and Social Studies.

 

Students will be licensed to teach in Wisconsin in social studies disciplines in which they have earned a minimum of nine semester credits. Courses taken to satisfy this nine credit block should be selected from courses recommended for the minor in that field. Students should distribute their course work to make themselves eligible for certification in the maximum number of subject areas. It is possible to earn certification in three areas under Option A and four under Option B. More detailed information about the broadfield social studies options may be obtained from the Middle Level/Secondary Program Director, Morris Hall.

 

 

  
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THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL STUDIES (CLS)

 

Dean — John Magerus

Associate Deans — Ruthann Benson, Charles Martin-Stanley

Assistants to the Dean: Chris Bakkum, Kathy Elgin

227 Graff Main Hall; (608) 785-8113

www.uwlax.edu/LS/index.htm

 

Departments/Units

English

Environmental Studies

Ethnic & Racial Studies

Foreign Languages

Gerontology Program

History

Honors Program

International Studies

Military Science

Philosophy

Political Science/Public Administration

Psychology

Sociology/Archaeology

Women’s Studies

 

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Science

Master of Science in Education

Education Specialist

 

MAJORS AND MINORS

 

Humanities/Social Sciences Majors:

*Archaeology — BA/BS

*Economics — BA/BS

*English — BA

*French — BA

 French w/Business Concentration —BA *German Studies— BA

 German w/Business Concentration — BA

*History — BA/BS

*History w/Regional World Emphasis — BA/BS

*Philosophy — BA/BS

*Political Science — BA/BS

*Psychology — BA/BS

*Public Administration — BA/BS

*Sociology — BA/BS

*Spanish — BA

 Spanish w/Business Concentration — BA

 

 

Minors (only):

Anthropology

Creative Writing

Criminal Justice

Environmental Studies

Ethnic and Racial Studies

Professional Writing

International Studies

Latin American Emphasis

European Emphasis

Military Science

Public History

Teaching English to Speakers of Other

Languages

Women’s Studies

 

 

  
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Emphases /Programs

Child/Youth Care

Gerontology

University Honors

 

The College of Liberal Studies includes departments and programs in the humanities, social sciences and interdisciplinary studies, as well as the School of Arts and Communication. It is dedicated to continuing the established liberal studies tradition of providing many curricula leading to the bachelor of arts or the bachelor of science degree.

 

The College of Liberal Studies is dedicated to providing quality instruction and learning experiences which prepare students for future education or careers and meaningful, responsible lives by fostering a climate of intellectual curiosity and creativity.

Graduates of the College will have developed the ability to communicate effectively, to think critically, to conduct sound research, to understand global issues, to use knowledge in all aspects of life, to participate meaningfully as citizens, and to discover and apply worthwhile values.

 

The College is committed to maintaining academic integrity and high ethical standards. The College, through its faculty, students, and curricula, is also dedicated to advancing cultural diversity. Furthermore, by developing partnerships and encouraging professional connections, the College establishes its membership in the broader community.

The academic community within the College of Liberal Studies supports a strong General Education program, nurtures exceptional disciplinary programs, and creates innovative interdisciplinary and international programs which, together, promote lifelong personal and professional learning.

 

PROGRAMS IN THE HUMANITIES, SOCIAL SCIENCES, AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

 

At the heart of the College of Liberal Studies are the departments which teach the humanities and social sciences. These departments have traditionally represented the cornerstone disciplines of a university. They offer essential experiences that prepare students for lifelong learning. Courses in the humanities and social sciences introduce students to cultural, ethnic and racial diversity; international dimensions of politics, economics, language and culture; social institutions and social interactions; theories and applications of human behavior; and the great writing that develops and explores these realms of  knowledge.

 

All students at UW-L take courses in the humanities and social sciences even though they may not major in one of these programs. Many of the skills courses and liberal studies courses of the General Education program at UW-L are offered by departments in the humanities and social sciences. The skills that are built are those that enable students to proceed with effective and efficient learning.

 

Courses in the humanities and social sciences provide individuals with solid reading and writing abilities, an understanding of cultural diversity, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, the ability to integrate and synthesize ideas, and a sense of personal responsibility. Courses in these disciplines help individuals learn from the past, explore the present and adapt to the future. The liberal studies program is designed to be an enriching experience which produces a well-rounded individual.

The humanities at UW-L are taught in the departments of English, foreign languages, history, and philosophy. The social sciences are taught in the departments of political science/public administration, psychology, and sociology/archaeology. The College of Liberal Studies also offers interdisciplinary opportunities in the departments of military science (ROTC) and women’s studies, as well as in criminal justice, environmental studies, honors, international studies, and ethnic and racial studies. The College of Liberal Studies participates in the child/youth care and gerontology emphases. These programs supplement and complement many others found throughout the university.

 

 

  
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SCHOOL OF ARTS AND COMMUNICATION (SAC)

 

Director — Ruthann Benson

Assistant to the Dean — Kathy Elgin

227 Graff Main Hall; (608) 785-8113

www.uwlax.edu/LS

 

Departments

Art

Communication Studies

Music

Theatre Arts

 

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Science

 

 

MAJORS AND MINORS

 

Arts and Communication Majors:

*Art — BA/BS

Communication Studies — BA/BS

*Interpersonal Communication Emphasis

*Public Relations and Organizational

                              Communication Emphasis

      *Persuasion and Public Communication

                              Emphasis

      *Telecommunication Emphasis

*Music — BA/BS

                  History Emphasis

                  Jazz Performance Emphasis

                  Performance Emphasis

                  Piano Pedagogy

                  Theory Emphasis

Photography (minor only)

Theatre Arts — BA/BS

                  *General Studies Emphasis

                  *Performance Emphasis

                  *Design/Technical Emphasis

                  *Management Emphasis

 

The School of Arts and Communication is dedicated to supporting and enhancing

liberal studies while providing a complete pre-professional curriculum. School of Arts and Communication programs strive to develop the knowledge, freedom and spontaneity which underlie creative expression in its highest forms. Classes focus

on establishing the foundations for creative work through the study of technical, historical, and artistic dimensions in the arts. The primary activity involves hands-on experience, so students spend much of their time in laboratories, studios, and rehearsals developing the skills, processes, and attitudes necessary for success. Students in these programs specialize in a particular art or communication discipline as they acquire general knowledge through the liberal studies core. Upon completion of their program, they have a wide range of occupational and educational choices. Some graduates begin careers in the fine or performing arts or the mass media. Others enter graduate schools, specializing in some aspect of their previous study or in some related field. Still others choose from a wide range of occupations where their creative and communicative skills serve them well. Many will become effective teachers. Whatever the career and whatever the future, graduates of the School of Arts and Communication are flexible, adaptable, and disciplined communicators who understand process, problem solving, and commitment.

 

  
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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL STUDIES DEGREE OPTIONS

 

A student in the College of Liberal Studies or School of Arts and Communication may earn either the Bachelor of Arts (BA) or the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree. The type of degree earned by a student (BA or BS) may be determined by the major programs elected by the student. All general university degree requirements must be met (as listed on p. 53) a minimum of 120 credits (40 of which must be 300/400 numbered courses), General Education program requirements, (as listed on pp. 49-52) college core requirements, and major program requirements.

 

ADVISING

 

All students in the College of Liberal Studies are assigned to faculty advisers. They provide guidance and assistance to those students who are undecided on major fields of study and assist those with clearly defined goals to develop plans for post-college experience. Students and their advisers are provided with computerized degree audits (SNAP reports) that assist them in monitoring progress in meeting degree requirements. Degrees are verified in the Office of the Dean. Students are encouraged to come to the office to review progress toward the degree during their junior year.

 

COLLEGE CORE REQUIREMENTS

 

The core requirements of the College of Liberal Studies enhance the students’

experience of the liberal arts tradition in higher education. Building on the General Education Program, the CLS Core Curriculum emphasizes critical inquiry marked by rigor, balanced breadth, and intellectual integrity. The CLS Core Curriculum contains I.) a common core of requirements for students majoring in CLS programs and II.) requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees.

 

 

 

I.          Common Core Curriculum

In addition to the minimum requirements in each category of the university’s General Education Program, all students in the College of Liberal Studies (CLS) must complete the following common core curriculum:

 

      A.        History

Complete HIS 152, Roots of the Modern World, or any HIS course at the 200 or 300 level.

 

B.        Global and Multicultural Studies/Minority Cultures or Multiracial Women’s Studies  (One course required)

Complete a second General Education course from Minority Cultures or Multiracial Women’s Studies selected from: ECO 336; EFN 205; ENG/ERS 207, 210, 215;  ERS 100; HIS 306, 336; HON 220; POL 205; PSY 285, 318; SOC 225; W-S 100, 210, 230:

or

Complete a second General Education Global and Multicultural Studies course selected from ART 201; ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POL, or SOC 202; ECO 120; ENG 208; ENV 201; FRE 220; GEO 110, 200; MUS 204; PHL 230; POL 234; PSY 280.

 

      C.        Self and Society  (One course required)

Complete a second General Education course from Self and Society (from a different discipline than the student’s first General Education course in this category). Select from: ECO 110; ENG 220; HIS 206; HON 206; POL 101 or 102; PSY 100; SOC 110 or 120 or ARC 100 or ANT 101.

 

      D.     Humanistic Studies (one course required)

Complete a second General Education Course from Humanistic Studies (from a different discipline than the student’s first General Education course in this category). Select from: FLG 299 or HON 203 or 205 (if not selected from General Education list 1); HIS 205 or PHL 100 or POL 251 or HON 100 (if HON 203 or 205 is not taken under list I above).

 

            E.         Second Major, Minor or Program Option Requirement

Complete a minor (or second major) outside of the student’s major program, consisting of at least 18 credits. An emphasis, program or concentration may be used to fulfill this requirement provided it is outside the major program and consists of 18 credits not used in the General Education, CLS common core, or major;

                                                                  or

Complete 18 credits in two or more departments or programs earned at the 300 or 400 level. These courses must be outside the major department and can be from any college. These cannot be General Education or CLS common core courses.

 

 

  
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II.   Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science Core Requirements

Students majoring in English or in a Foreign Language must earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. Students majoring in other CLS programs may choose either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. In addition to the common core requirements listed in I. above, the following courses are required for the degree the student is seeking:

 

        A. For the Bachelor of Arts Degree

Complete FRE 202 or GER 202 or SPA 202 or FLG 202 or ESL proficiency score of 80 or above on the La Crosse Battery of exams for non-native speakers of English. (Contact the English as a Second Language Institute for eligibility and

      regulations.)

 

   B. For the Bachelor of Science Degree (two courses required)

        
            1. Complete a second General Education Science course (from a different discipline

than the student’s first General Education course in this category) selected from BIO 103 or 105; BIO 102; MIC 100; CHM 100 or CHM 103; ESC 101; HON 290; HON 295; PHY 103 or PHY 106 or 125 or PHY 203; AST/PHY 155; PSY/BIO 107.

or

        Complete a second science course selected from ENV 201 or PHL 334.

 

      2. Complete a research emphasis course or sequence of courses in the major program

        from the following list of applicable courses.

 

 

Research Methods Courses — Bachelor of Science Requirement

 

                                       Course or course sequence     

Major  for the Bachelor of Science

Program                                           Degree

 

ARC                               ARC 445, Research Methods in Archaeology

ART*                              A sequence of courses as outlined below

CST                                CST 499, Senior Project in Communication Studies

ECO                               BUS 230 or ECO 307 or POL 361

HIS                                 HIS 490, Historiography

MUS**                           A sequence of courses as outlined below

PHL                                PHL 496, Integrative Seminar in Philosophy

POL                                POL 361, Research Methods in Politics and Government

PSY                                PSY 231 and 232, Experimental Psychology

                                       and PSY 451 Psychological Measure (PSY 420,

                                       Research Foundations also an option)

PUB ADM                      POL 361, Research Methods in Politics and Government

 

 

SOC                               SOC 350, Sociological Research and SOC 402, Clinical Sociology Careers, or SOC 405, Applied Sociology, or

                                       SOC 480, Comparative Sociology/Anthropology or

                                       SOC 499, Seminar in Sociology.

THA                               THA 490, Senior Project

 

 

  
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THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ALLIED HEALTH (SAH)

 

Dean — Michael Nelson

Associate Dean — Martin Venneman

Assistants to the Dean — CarlaBurkhardt,

      Karen Palmer-McLean,

      Mark Sandheinrich

105 Graff Main Hall; (608)785-8218

www.uwlax.edu/sah

e-mail to: science@uwlax.edu

 

Departments/Units

Biology

Chemistry

Clinical Sciences

  Medical Lab Science

  Nuclear Medicine Technology

  Occupational Therapy

  Physician Assistant Studies

  Radiation Therapy

Computer Science

Geography/Earth Science

Mathematics

Microbiology

Physical Therapy

Physics

 

Degrees Offered

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Science

Master of Science

Master of Science Physical Therapy

 

 

 

  
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MAJORS AND MINORS

*Biology — BA/BS

      Aquatic Science Concentration

      Biomedical Science Concentration

      Cellular and Molecular Concentration

      Environmental Science Concentration

*Chemistry — BA/BS

      ACS Certification

      Business Concentration

      Environmental Science Concentration

*Computer Science— BS

*Geography — BA/BS

      *Applied Geography Concentration

      Environmental Science Concentration

*Mathematics — BA/BS

      *Statistics Emphasis

Medical Laboratory Science— BS

Microbiology — BA/BS

        Occupational Therapy — BS

Physician Assistant Studies— BS

*Physics — BA/BS

*Astronomy Emphasis

      Computational Physics Emphasis

      Optics Emphasis

      Biomedical Science Concentration

      Business Concentration

Physics/Engineering: Dual Degree Program

Radiation Science-Nuclear Medicine Technology—BS

Radiation Science-Radiation Therapy—BS

 

The following minors and emphases are also offered within the college:

              Computational Science Minor

              Earth Science Minor

             Geoarchaeology Minor

 

The College of Science and Allied Health houses high quality major and minor programs in the natural and physical sciences, mathematics and computer science, and in selected allied health professions. The college’s combination of programs provides both applications for the sciences and a strong science base for the allied health offerings. These programs also collectively provide many scientific literacy offerings within the university’s General Education program.

 

All major programs offer undergraduate research experiences and/or professional internship experiences through collaborative agreements with external agencies.

Sequences and requirements are listed in the Undergraduate Course and Program Description section of the catalog.

 

In addition to the major and General Education requirements, all students in the College of Science and Allied Health must complete a core curriculum which emphasizes diverse in-depth study outside of the major.

 

  
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CORE CURRICULUM

 

1.   For the Bachelor of Science degree, students must complete

A.        a major from the college plus a minor (or a second major) from any college

                                                      or

B.         a major from the college plus 18 credits at the 300 or 400 level in courses outside the major department from any college.

2.   For the Bachelor of Arts degree, students must complete a major from the college plus proficiency in a foreign language at the 202 level or an ESL proficiency score of 80 or above on the La Crosse Battery of exams for non-native speakers of English. (Contact the English as a Second Language Institute for eligibility and regulations.)

                                                      and

A.        a minor in the College of Liberal Studies

                                                       or

B.         15 credits at the 300 level or above in the College of Liberal Studies.

3.   Students who receive a degree in Chemistry with a Business Concentration, Medical Laboratory Science, Occupational Therapy, Radiation Science-Nuclear Medicine Technology, or Radiation Science-Radiation Therapy may satisfy the college core requirements for the bachelor of science degree by completing the special core requirements approved for the major.

 

 

CLINICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

 

The Clinical Science Department offers five degree programs: Medical Laboratory Science (MLS), Radiation Science-Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT), Occupational Therapy (OT), Physician Assistant Studies (PA), and Radiation Science-Radiation Therapy (RT). These disciplines each have entrance requirements and selective admissions processes. Therefore, UW-L students interested in one of these fields will declare that discipline as a pre-professional second major (e.g. pre-MLS) prior to making formal application to that program. In addition, another major is chosen as a first major (e.g. Biology or Psychology). Students interested in transferring to UW-L to enroll in a Clinical Science program should consult that program for advice regarding transfer.

 

Upon acceptance into the professional program, the student then declares the professional program as their primary major (e.g. MLS) and may complete their previously identified primary major as well (e.g. Biology or Psychology). Prerequisite courses and other pre-professional experiences (such as clinical observation, volunteer or other healthcare experiences) required for admission vary by program. However, several prerequisite courses are common to all five Clinical Science programs, including Introductory/General Biology, General Chemistry and Human Anatomy and Physiology. Students accepted into the professional programs complete additional classroom and laboratory experiences along with internships and/or clinical practica to fulfill requirements for the major. Detailed descriptions of these programs follow.

 

  
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MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE (MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY)

 

The clinical laboratory scientist (medical technologist) is a vital member of the health care team. The medical laboratory is the largest single provider of health status information. Over 60 percent of the data required to make a diagnosis, monitor therapy, or assess wellness comes from laboratory test results. The education and experience necessary to interpret laboratory results as well as the ability to make independent decisions concerning the quality of laboratory results are required of the clinical laboratory scientist.

 

The clinical laboratory scientist performs laboratory tests on blood, body fluids, and tissues. He/she must be able to work accurately and quickly to determine the presence or absence of a disease as well as the cause of the disease. Through various laboratory procedures, the immune system is studied; organisms that have caused infections are identified and appropriate antibiotic therapy is determined; blood and body fluids are analyzed for the level of chemical constituents; the hematological system is evaluated; and the red blood cell and white blood cell antigens are identified in order to select appropriate blood products for transfusion or compatibility for organ transplantation. The clinical laboratory scientist manages the quality of laboratory testing.

 

In addition to analytical testing, other responsibilities include education of peers, students and less educated and trained laboratory personnel; research and development of new techniques and procedures; instrument evaluation; and supervision and management of the laboratory as well as management of multidisciplinary areas of the hospital.

 

The major in medical laboratory science provides students with an educational foundation in the sciences and experiences in the clinical laboratory. Graduates will possess the entry level competencies required to work in this highly skilled allied health profession. The curriculum requires a minimum of seven semesters on campus in prerequisite and professional courses. Students spend six months in the clinical education rotations at one of the affiliated clinical laboratories. A bachelor of science degree is awarded at the satisfactory completion of all required course work.

 

Admission to the medical laboratory science major is on a competitive basis. Students apply for admission to the MLS major early in the spring semester of the academic year just prior to the beginning of their professional studies. Formal acceptance into the major, effective at the beginning of the summer session, is made following completion of the selection process which includes the submission of a formal application for admission to the major, personal recommendations, review of academic performance, and interview with the Program Admission Committee. Grade point averages of at least 2.75 overall as well as in science and mathematics courses are recommended. Students formally admitted to the major are assured of professional clinical study (clinical practicum) provided they demonstrate continued high level academic performance and complete all requirements. If a student elects to apply to one of the hospital-sponsored programs, which is a nine-month clinical education program, he/she will enroll in the same clinical practica and receive the same course credit. The medical laboratory science program at UW-L is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science (8410 West Bryn Mawr, Suite 670, Chicago, IL 60631; 773-714-8880). Senior students in the clinical education component of the program will enroll at UW-L for 19 credits in clinical courses, two credits for the capstone course required of the major, and pay full tuition. The clinical education will routinely begin late August with anticipated graduation the following spring.

 

Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for certification examinations offered by accredited national certification agencies.

 

  
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Clinical Practicum Affiliate (6 month rotation, part of UW-L sponsored program)

  Mayo Clinic Laboratories

      Rochester, Minn.

  Franciscan Skemp

      La Crosse, Wis.

  St. Vincent Hospital

      Green Bay, Wis.

 

Other Hospital Affiliates (9 month rotation, must apply for admission if elect to attend one of the following hospital-sponsored programs)

— Hennepin County Medical Center

      Minneapolis, Minn.

  Saint Joseph’s Hospital/Marshfield Laboratories

      Marshfield, Wis.

  Sacred Heart Hospital

      Eau Claire, Wis.

  Wausau Hospital,

      Wausau, Wis.

  St. Elizabeth Hospital

      Appleton, Wis.

 

Medical Laboratory Science Curriculum

 

Special Core Requirements:                                                                   Credits

*BIO

105 

General Biology

4

MIC

230

Microbiology   

4

BIO

306

Genetics or MIC 416   

4-5

BIO

312-313

Human Anatomy Physiology I and II  

8   

MIC

406 

Immunology 

4

MIC

407

Pathogenic Bacteriology 

4

*CHM

103   

General Chemistry I 

5

CHM 

104

General Chemistry II  

5      

CHM 

300 

Survey of Organic Chemistry 

5

   

   

   

  or

CHM

303- 

Organic Chemistry Theory I and II 

6

304-305

Organic Chemistry Laboratory

2

CHM 

325

Survey of Biochemistry 

4

   

   

   or

 

CHM 

417

Biochemistry I 

3

   

   

   and

 

CHM 

418

Biochemistry II 

3

*MTH

150 

College Algebra or higher

4

     

 

  
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Electives Recommended

*C-S 101                  Introduction to Computing

*MTH 205                Elementary Statistics

 

Professional Courses (on campus) Requirements

MLS  

380 

Professional Issues in Med Lab Science  

2

MLS 

390 

Quality Systems in the Clinical Lab  

2

MLS 

395 

Body Fluids 

2

MLS 

400

Clinical Immunology

3

MLS

405

Clinical Chemistry   

4

MLS 

410

Clinical Hematology  

4

MLS

415

Diagnostic Medical Microbiology 

5

MLS 

420

Immunohematology 

3

MLS 

425

Molecular Pathology 

3

MLS

430

Med Lab Management & Education

2

MLS 

435

Research Design & Methods

1

MLS 

449

Clinical Correlations

2

 

Clinical Practicum Courses (off campus) Requirements

MLS 

450

Clin Chemistry Practicum

5

MLS 

455

Clin Hematology & Hemostasis Practicum 

5

MLS 

460 

Clin Immunohematology Practicum  

5

MLS

465 

Clin Immunology Practicum  

3

MLS 

470 

Diagnostic Microbiology Practicum  

6

MLS 

475 

Advanced Applications Practicum  

1

MLS 

492 

Clinical Correlations 

2  

MLS

493 

Clinical Correlations  

2

MLS

499 

Advanced Clin Studies 

2

   

   

   (capstone rotation/research)

 

Electives

MLS 495                  Independent Study in Med Lab Sci                             1-3

MLS 496                  Special Topics in Med Lab Sci                                  1-3

 

Special core requirement courses and all professional courses must be completed with a grade of “C”or above. Students must meet all university graduation requirements including those for General Education, grade point, university residency and total credits.

 

 

 

  
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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

 

Occupational therapists are health professionals who work with individuals to maximize performance in their everyday life tasks when impacted by injury, disease, or other health risk. Occupational therapists are part of a healthcare team that may also include physicians, physician assistants, physical therapists, speech pathologists, and recreational therapists. “Occupation” refers to those everyday meaningful tasks that individuals do every day. The goal of occupational therapy is to help individuals successfully engage in these goal-directed, purposeful tasks that comprise daily life.

The occupational therapy program is designed to offer a high quality curriculum which includes a substantial science core; offer clinical experiences across the life-span; and prepare graduates to accept positions in rural or under-served regions.

The Occupational Therapy Program at UW-La Crosse has been accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (4720 Montgomery Ln., P. O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220; (301) 652-AOTA). Students graduating from the program are eligible to sit for the national certification examination administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of the exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). Most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination.

 

The curriculum of the program is comprised of pre-professional, professional, and fieldwork components. The pre-professional component includes core courses in anatomy and physiology, biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, psychology, and sociology or philosophy plus additional General Education requirements. The professional component of the curriculum is an approved writing-in-the major program and, thus, meets graduation writing emphasis requirements. All fieldwork must be completed within 24 months following completion of academic course work.

 

 

Occupational Therapy Pre-Professional Curriculum Special Core Requirements:

 

*BIO 

105   

   General Biology  

4

BIO

312-313

Human Anatomy/Physiology I and II

8

*MTH

151 

Pre-Calculus 

4

*MTH

205   

Elementary Statistics 

4

   

   

   or

*MTH   

 250

Statistics  

3

*CHM   

 103

General Chemistry I

5

*PSY

100 

General Psychology  

3

PSY 

212  

Life-Span Development 

3

   

   

   or

   

PSY 

310  

Child Development  

3

PSY  

304  

Abnormal Psychology   

3

PSY 

312 

Adulthood and Aging 

3

*SOC

110 

The Social World

   

   

  or

*PHL 

100 

Intro. to Philosophy 

3

*PHY  

103, 104 

Fundamental Physics I and II 

8

 

 

  
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Electives Recommended:

CSC 

106 

Introduction to Allied Health Careers 

2

HED

360

Medical Terminology 

1

PHL 

339 

Medical Ethics 

3

CST

230 

Introduction to Interpersonal Comm.

   

   

   or

   

CST 

354   

Health Communication  

3

*C-S

101   

Intro. to Computing 

4

*SAH 

105   

Health, Wellness and Disease  

3

 

* This course will also fulfill General Education requirements.  May substitute BIO 103 for BIO 105.

 

Prior to applying for admittance to the professional program, students must complete the above Core courses and all General Education requirements except for the writing emphasis courses with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75. In addition, students must complete health-related experiences prior to applying for admittance to the professional program. Admission and course requirements may change without notice. Application to the professional program occurs at the end of the second year of study, or when all pre-requisite requirements of the pre-professional program have been completed (or a demonstrated plan for completion is outlined). Specific deadlines and application materials are available in Room 4031 Health Science Building.

www.uwlax.edu/ot

 

 

Professional Curriculum

CSC

421

Human Gross Anatomy 

7

O-T

401

Intro. to Occupational Therapy 

1

O-T

402

Sensorimotor Develop.

2  

O-T

404

Therapeutic Techniques I

3

O-T

405

Occupations Theory 

4

O-T

406

OT Practice I 

1

O-T 

422 

Physiology  

3

O-T 

425

Neuroanatomy 

3

O-T

441

Applied Comm./Allied Health Prof.

1 

O-T

446

Professional Ethics

1

O-T

410

Research Designs in OT 

3

O-T

411

Biomech. Applications 

3

O-T

412

Pediatric Rehabilitation

3

O-T 

413

Occupations & Pediatrics 

4

O-T

414

Therapeutic Techniques II 

2   

O-T

426 

Pathophysiology 

2

O-T

443 

Healthcare Systems 

2

O-T

461

Occ. & Psychosocial Dysfunction  

4  

O-T

462

Adult Rehabilitation

3 

O-T

463 

Practice & Measurement

3  

O-T

464 

Occupations & Adulthood   

2

O-T

465 

Occupations & Aging

4

O-T

466

OT Practice II 

2

O-T

470 

Capstone Seminar in OT 

2 

O-T

471

Research & Symposium in OT   

2    

O-T

480 

Fieldwork (summer

9

O-T

480

Fieldwork (fall)

15

 

  
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PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES PROGRAM

 

Physician assistants (PAs) are health professionals licensed to practice medicine with the supervision of a physician. Physician assistants work in a variety of practice settings including hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and research centers.

PAs are qualified to take medical histories, examine patients, order and administer diagnostic tests, make diagnoses, treat illnesses, and assist in surgery. They are trained to provide care that otherwise might be provided by a physician. Physician assistants can provide care as generalists in primary care situations, or in subspecialty areas of medicine. Common specialties in which PAs practice include family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, emergency medicine, surgery, and pediatrics.

 

The PA program represents a partnership of UW-L, the Gundersen Lutheran Medical Foundation of La Crosse and the Mayo School of Health-Related Sciences of Rochester, MN. The professional curriculum is 28 months in length and involves classes on the campuses of all three partner institutions. The curriculum includes a 15-month preclinical phase consisting primarily of classroom and laboratory activities. A 13-month clinical phase follows and involves rotations in a variety of clinical specialties and a three-month family medicine preceptorship. These clinical experiences are provided primarily using Mayo, Gundersen Lutheran and other practice sites in western Wisconsin, southern Minnesota and northeastern Iowa.

Upon completion of all graduation requirements and the professional curriculum, students are awarded a bachelor of science degree in Physician Assistant Studies from UW-L and a certificate of completion from the program. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) through the Accreditation Review Committee for Physician Assistant Education (ARC-PA). To be licensed for practice graduates must also pass the Physician Assistant National Certification Exam (PANCE) administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA).

The rigor and intensity of the program, and the level of skills and responsibility necessary for practice as a physician assistant, require the program to accept candidates who have demonstrated a strong academic background along with excellent interpersonal skills and maturity. Prior health care experience is also an indicator of a career commitment suitable to clinical practice. The program's admission process considers each applicant's strengths, and selects for admission those best qualified to meet the program's mission. Application to the program is very competitive with a class of 12 students accepted annually. Most students entering the program already hold a baccalaureate degree.

 

Factors considered in the admission process include academic preparation; motivation, maturity, ability to work with people, and suitability for clinical practice; health care and other work experience; knowledge of the PA profession and the profession's role in the health care system; background in, and potential for future practice in the rural and/or underserved service areas of the program’s partner institutions; letters of recommendation; and personal and group interviews. More information is available from the PA Programs Web site www.uwlax.edu/pastudies or through the PA program office.

 

 

  
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PA Program Prerequisites

At the time of application, candidates must have the prerequisites completed or be able to demonstrate a plan to complete the prerequisites prior to enrollment in the program. In addition to the academic prerequisites, applicants must also meet the program’s technical standards.

 

Candidates who have significant work and life experience but lack one or more of the following prerequisites numbered 2-6 may still be considered for acceptance into the program. Please refer to Special Consideration for details.

 

Academic Prerequisites:

1.   Completion of the UW-L General Education Program and completion of at least 90 semester hours; or already hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college.

2.   A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00.

3.   A minimum of five semesters of Biology, at least two semesters of which must include a laboratory. These courses must, at a minimum, include the following:

—One semester of General/Introductory Biology intended as a course for biology majors (BIO 105*)

—One semester of Human Anatomy and one semester of Human Physiology, or a two-semester combined Human Anatomy and Physiology course sequence (BIO 312 and 313)

      —One semester of Microbiology (MIC 230)

—A course in at least one of the following areas of biology: Genetics (BIO 306), Immunology (MIC 406), Developmental Biology (BIO 408), or Endocrinology (BIO 424)

4.   A minimum of four semesters of Chemistry, at least two semesters of which must include a laboratory. These courses must, at minimum, include the following:

— Two semesters of General/Introductory/ Inorganic Chemistry intended as courses for chemistry/biology majors (CHM 103* and 104)

— One semester of Organic Chemistry intended as a course for chemistry/ biology majors. Students will generally take a two-semester sequence (CHM 303, 304, and 305 lab) though this is not required

— One semester of Biochemistry (CHM 325 or 417 and 418), Molecular Biology (BIO 435), or Cell Physiology/Cell Biology (BIO 315)

5.   A minimum of two semesters of mathematics which must include:

— One semester of College Algebra with Trigonometry or Pre-calculus (MTH 151*) or Calculus (MTH 207*)

      — One semester of Statistics (MTH 205* or 250* or 305)

6.   A minimum of one semester of General/ Introductory Psychology (PSY 100*)

 

Additional Recommended Courses:

      It is recommended, but not required, that students also complete the following: a) at least one semester of physics (PHY 125* or PHY 103* and 104); b) one semester of sociology; and c) an additional psychology course.

 

* This course will also fulfill General Education requirements.  May substitute BIO 103 for BIO 105.

 

 

  
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Special Consideration

Some candidates may lack one or more of the prerequisites listed in 2 & 3 above, but have significant life and work experience that demonstrates their maturity and suitability for clinical practice. The program will consider such applicants on a case-by-case basis if a letter requesting special consideration is received with the completed application. This request should describe the experiences believed to justify the candidate's admission despite the lack of these prerequisites.

 

Approximately 30 percent of the students admitted thus far have been among those that requested special consideration. Generally such candidates lack no more than two of the prerequisite courses. Candidates whose cumulative GPA falls below the prerequisite minimum of 3.0 should show recent academic work which demonstrates a strong academic aptitude predictive of success in the program. Even candidates requesting special consideration must have completed courses which satisfy the UW-L General Education Program or already hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college.

 

Healthcare and Other Helping Profession Experience

Prior healthcare experience, or experience in another helping profession, is highly recommended as an indicator of a candidate's interpersonal skills, maturity and suitability to clinical practice. Such experience provides evidence of a career commitment to healthcare as a physician assistant. Though the program does not require a prerequisite length of prior healthcare experience, the length and quality of this experience are definite considerations in the admission process. A clear understanding of the role of the PA in the healthcare system is also required.

Once accepted in the PA Program students must complete the following courses:

 

 

Preclinical phase                                                                       Credits:

BIO

718 & 719 

Advcd Human Physiology I and II

8

CHM

427  

Advanced Biochem

4

CSC

421

Gross Anatomy

7

PAS

422   

Clinical Neuroanatomy  

1  

PAS

425   

Medical Pathophysiology   

5

PAS

426

Clinical Pathology  

2

PAS

427

Medical Pharmacology 

5

PAS

428

Medical Microbiology 

4

PAS

429

Clin. Diagnostic Skills 

2

PAS

430

Epidemiology and Interpretation of the Medical Literature for Clinical Practice

3

PAS

431, 432 & 433

Clinical Skills & Issues I, II & III

11

PAS

434   

Wellness, Preventive Medicine, & Healthcare Systems

3

PAS

435

Physical Diagnosis and Clinical Skills

2

PAS

436

Intro to Clinical Med 

15

 

    Clinical phase

PAS 

460

Dermatology Clinical Rotation

2

PAS

461

Emergency Medicine Clinical Rotation

4

PAS

462

Gen. Surgery Clinical Rotation 

6

PAS

463

Internal Med. Clinical Rotation

6

PAS

464

OB/Gyn Clinical Rotation

6

PAS

465

Orthopedics Clinical Rotation

4

PAS

466

Pediatrics Clinical  Rotation

6

PAS

467

Psychiatry Clinical Rotation   

4

PAS

470

Ind. Study: Elective Clinical Rotations

4

PAS

475

Family Medicine Preceptorship

12  

 

* This course will also fulfill General Education Requirements.

 

In addition, students must pass the PA program’s summative exam, and be approved for graduation by the program's student progress and conduct committee.

 

  
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RADIATION SCIENCE – NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY

 

Nuclear medicine technology is an allied health specialty employing the use of radio-active materials for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Students majoring in this program are provided a substantial educational foundation in the sciences and clinical applications in a hospital internship so that graduates may function as technologists. The pre-professional and professional programs collectively require six semesters on campus to earn a minimum of 96 credits including certain prescribed courses followed by a 12-month internship at an affiliated hospital’s school of nuclear medicine technology.

 

The university sponsors up to 30 clinical internships each year. The size of the Nuclear Medicine Technology program is limited by these internships. Students must make formal application to the program during the spring semester of either their sophomore or junior year (see adviser). Refer to the sample schedules on the next two pages. A Nuclear Medicine Technology Professional Program Selection Committee composed of representatives from the university and the program’s clinical affiliates evaluates each application on the basis of the applicant’s past academic performance (a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50 is required for admission into the professional program), their references, their past work experience, and the results of a formal interview. Based on these factors, the applicants are ranked and sponsored for entry into the professional program. Those students admitted to the professional curriculum will be eligible for an internship site upon successful completion of the on-campus course requirements and selection by a clinical affiliate. During the senior year, clinical internship students enroll at UW-L for a minimum of 34 semester credits in clinical courses and pay full tuition and fees. Upon successful completion of the internship and all other university requirements, students are awarded a bachelor of science degree with a major in radiation science-nuclear medicine technology.

Hospital educational programs of nuclear medicine technology are accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRC-NMT). Graduates are eligible to take the examination for certification as a certified nuclear medicine technologist offered by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) or as a nuclear medicine technologist offered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).

 

Nuclear Medicine Technology — Affiliated Schools

  Mayo School of Health-Related Sciences Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minn.

  Froedtert Hospital, Milwaukee, Wis.

  St. Joseph’s Hospital, Marshfield, Wis.

  St. Luke’s Hospital, Milwaukee, Wis.

  Veterans Administration Edward Hines, Jr. Hospital Hines, Ill.

  Gundersen/Lutheran Medical Center, La Crosse, Wis.

 

 

  
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Nuclear Medicine Technology Curriculum

 

Special Core Requirements                                                                             Credits

*C-S

101

Introduction to Computing   

 4

   

   

  or

*C-S

120

Introduction to Software Design I   

3

*PSY

100

General Psychology  

3

*SOC

110

The Social World

   

   

  or

  

*SOC

120

Social Problems 

3

 SOC

420

Health Care and Illness

   

   

  or

  

 SOC

422

Death, Grief and Bereavement  

3

*PHY

103

Fundamental Physics I 

4

   

   

  or

*PHY

125

Physics for Life Sciences 

4

 PHY

376

Nuclear Radiation Instruments and Measurement

3

*BIO

105

General Biology 

3

 BIO

312-313 

Human Anatomy–Physiology I & II

8

 BIO 

433

Radiation Biology

3

*CHM

103

General Chemistry I

5

CHM

104

General Chemistry II  

5

CHM

301

Analytical Chemistry 

5

CHM

300

Survey of Organic Chemistry 

5

   

   

   or

CHM

303-304

Organic Chemistry Theory I & II 

6

   

   

   and

   

 CHM 

305

Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

2

 CHM

461

Nuclear Chemistry 

4

*MTH

150

College Algebra

4

   

(or a higher numbered mathematics course)

*MTH   

 205

Elementary Statistics 

4

   

   

   or

  

*MTH   

 250   

Statistics 

3

NMT   

 201 

Introduction to Nuclear Medical Technology  

1

 NMT 

395

Immunology for Nuclear Medicine Technologist

2

                                     

 

Recommended Electives

CHM 325 — Biochemistry,

and HED 360— Medical Terminology

 

* This course will also fulfill General Education requirements.  May substitute BIO 103 for BIO 105.

 

It is recommended that students have at least 10 hours of observation in a nuclear medicine department before they apply to the professional program. Students must have completed all their General Education and pre-professional program requirements prior to their clinical internship experience. Special core requirement courses and NMT internship courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or above. A cumulative grade point average of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale is required for both acceptance into the professional program and for graduation with a degree in Nuclear Medicine Technology.

 

  
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Nuclear Medicine Technology Internship Courses

A minimum of 34 credits must be earned from NMT 400 level courses. Specific courses depend on the internship site. See p. 118 for a complete list of course titles, credits, and descriptions.

 

 

Nuclear Medicine Technology Sample Schedule

 

First Year Pre-professional

— Semester I. (17 total credits)

CHM 103                 General Chemistry I                                    5

MTH 150                  College Algebra                                          4

HIS 151                    World History to 1500                               3

ENG 110                  College Writing I                                        3

                                 Appreciation course                                    2

 

— Semester II. (18 total credits)

CHM 104                 General Chemistry II                                   5

BIO 105                   General Biology                                          4

SOC 110                  The Social World

                                          or

SOC 120                  Social Problems                                          3

CST 110                   Essentials of Speech Communication           3

HPR 105                   Creating a Healthy Active  Lifestyle             3

 

Second Year Pre-professional

— Semester I. (18 total credits)

CHM 300                 Foundations of Organic Chemistry              5

BIO 312                   Human Anatomy and Physiology I               4

C-S 101                    Introduction to Computing                          4

PHY 103                  Fundamental Physics I                                4

                                                     or

PHY 125                  Physics the Life Sciences                            4

NMT 201                 Introduction to Nuclear Medicine

                                     Technology                                             1

 

— Semester II. (18 total credits)

CHM 301                 Quantitative Analysis                                   5

BIO  313                  Human Anatomy and Physiology II             4

PSY 100                   General Psychology                                    3

MTH 205                  Elementary Statistics                                   4

                                 Appreciation Course                                   2

 

 

Third Year Professional

— Semester I. (18 total credits)

CHM 461                 Nuclear Chemistry                                      4

CHM 325                 Biochemistry (elective)                                4

MIC 230                   Microbiology                                              4

SOC 420                  Health Care and Illness                               3

                                 Minority Cultures or Multiracial

                                    Women’s Studies course

                                    requirement                                             3

 

— Semester II. (17 total credits)

BIO 433                   Radiation Biology                                       3

PHY 376                  Nuclear Radiation Instruments

                                    and Measurements                                   3

NMT 395                 Immunology for Nuclear Medicine

                                     Technologists                                          2

                                 Global Studies                                            3

                                 Literature                                                    3

                                 Elective                                                      3

 

Fourth Year Professional

— Internship: NMT 400 level courses

 

 

  
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RADIATION SCIENCE - RADIATION THERAPY

 

Radiation therapists are health care professionals skilled in the art and science of medical radiation treatment delivery. The majority of patients receiving radiation therapy have cancer. Along with surgery and chemotherapy, radiation therapy offers these patients the best chance to succeed in the fight against their disease. The major focus areas of the profession are the care and assessment of patients, simulation, planning and delivery of treatments utilizing linear accelerator produced radiation and radioisotopes. Aims of care include cure, relief of symptoms, and improvement of patients’ quality of life. High technology equipment and innovative treatment methods are utilized to maximize treatment effectiveness. Radiation therapists must have excellent technical skills, but must also be empathetic and effective communicators. Much satisfaction is gained from close patient interaction and the specialty’s team approach with radiation oncologists, physicists, nurses and other medical specialists. Radiation therapy is “technology with a human touch.”

 

The major in radiation therapy provides students with an educational foundation in the sciences and humanities as well as clinical experience in a radiation therapy department. The curriculum requires six semesters on campus in pre-professional and professional core courses prior to the senior clinical internship. The clinical internship begins in June of the senior year, extends for 14 months and is spent at an affiliated Clinical Internship Site. When students have met all requirements of the major and the University, they are eligible for graduation and to apply to take the national certification exam.

 

Admission to the major is on a competitive basis. Students are advised to apply for admission to the professional program by February 1, prior to the beginning of their professional studies, after having taken or registered for the pre-professional requirements. Application, admission and selection information is included later in the publication. Acceptance, effective at the beginning of the junior year, is made following completion of the selection process. A grade of “C” or better in all required courses is needed to retain good standing in the major. Students who successfully meet program requirements will interview with the clinical sites during their junior year and upon selection by one of the sites, will be assigned to a senior clinical internship. While student preferences in internship site are taken into account, students are not guaranteed that they will be assigned in accordance with their choices of clinical site.

 

UW-L, in cooperation with its clinical internship sites, currently provides the only training and degree program in radiation therapy in the State of Wisconsin. The radiation therapy program at UW-L is designed to offer a high quality radiation therapy curriculum rich in academic and clinical experiences. During the clinical internship, students will work directly with registered radiation therapists in direct patient care in busy and highly regarded radiation oncology departments. The program also seeks to foster, in its students, the professional development, problem solving and leadership skills needed for current and future health care environments.

 

Radiation Therapy Program Mission

The mission of the Radiation Therapy Program at UW-L is to educate and train radiation therapists who are knowledgeable, technically competent and dedicated to their profession and their patients, while meeting the educational and personal needs of its students by emphasizing excellence in education and offering a broad based curriculum in  liberal studies, professional courses and clinical internship.

 

Radiation Therapy Affiliated Clinical Internship Sites

  St. Luke’s Medical Center

      Milwaukee, Wis.

  University of Wisconsin Hospital

      Madison, Wis.

  Abbott Northwestern,

      Virginia Piper Cancer Center

      Minneapolis, Minn.

  University of Chicago Hospital

      Chicago, Ill.

 

  
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Radiation Therapy Curriculum Special Core Requirements           

                     

                                                                                                    Credits

Pre-professional

*C-S 101                  Introduction to Computing                          4

*PSY 100                 General Psychology                                    3

*SOC 110                The Social World                                       3

                                             or

*SOC 120                Social problems                                          3

*MTH 151                Pre-calculus                                                4

*MTH 205                Elementary Statistics                                   4

                                            or

*MTH 250                Statistics                                                     3

*CHM 103-104        Gen. Chem. I & II                                      10

*BIO 105                 General Biology                                          4

 BIO 312-313           Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II       8

*PHY 125                Physics for Allied Health (or PHY 103

                                    & 104)                                                    4(8)

 

Professional Core

BIO 306                   Genetics                                                     4

BIO 432                   Biology of Cancer                                       2

BIO 433                   Radiation Biology                                       3

PHY 386                  Radiation Physics                                        3

HED 360                  Medical Terminology                                  1

R-T 310                    Pathology for Radiation Therapists              3

ECO 471                  Health Economics                                       3

CST 354                   Health Communications                              3

R-T 350                    Patient Care Issues for Radiation

                                    Therapists                                                3

R-T 390                    Medical Imaging for Radiation

                                    Therapists                                                3

 

Recommended Electives

CSC 106                  Introduction to Health Careers                    2

MGT 398                  Total Quality Mgt                                       3

PHL 339                   Medical Ethics                                            3

SOC 420                  Health Care & Illness                                  3

SOC 422                  Death, Grief and Bereavement                    3

 

 

Clinical Internship Courses

R-T  401                   Orientation to Radiation Therapy                 3

R-T  411                   Principles & Practice of Radiation

                                    Therapy I                                                4

R-T  412                   Principles & Practice of Radiation

                                    Therapy II                                               4

R-T  421                   Cross Sectional & Radiographic

                                    Anatomy                                                 2

R-T  431                   Radiation Therapy Physics                          3

R-T  435                   Dosimetry                                                   3

R-T  437                   Quality Assurance                                       2

R-T  471                   Clinical Practicum                                       5

R-T  472                   Clinical Practicum                                       6

R-T  473                   Clinical Practicum                                       6

R-T  474                   Clinical Practicum                                       5

R-T  481                   Seminar in Radiation Therapy                      3

 

 

  
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MINORS AND PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS

 

COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE MINOR

 

In many scientific disciplines, direct computation has become the tool of first choice for studying and simulating phenomena. Adequate preparation for graduate study in the sciences now includes a background in computation. Moreover, undergraduates seeking employment with corporations involved in applying science often find themselves confronted with day-to-day use of computational methods.

 

The minor in computational science provides students an opportunity to distinguish themselves by augmenting their scientific studies with a background in computation. Similarly, computer science and mathematics students will be provided a new option to study scientific applications of their fields. The computational science minor is highly interdisciplinary, combining the study of computer science and mathematics with the study of specific problems in the sciences and the computational methods required for their solution. This minor is one of a handful in the U.S. at this time.

 

 

APPLIED GEOGRAPHY MINOR

 

The Applied Geography Minor is designed to provide students majoring in disciplines outside of geography with a focused emphasis on learning field and laboratory techniques used by geographers while encouraging the selection of relevant electives in support areas such as mathematics, and computer science. The goal of this curriculum is to prepare students for professional positions in business, industry and government, or for graduate programs in cartography, remote sensing, land use planning, and geographic information systems. The program encourages students to participate in internship programs and undergraduate research to apply their newly learned techniques to problem solving in a production or research environment.

The job market has become increasingly competitive for graduates in the technically focused disciplines included in our Applied Geography Minor. The need for skilled professionals grows as businesses and governmental agencies are asked to solve ever more complex spatial (locational) problems dealing with the marketing of products, routing of transport services, and environmental protection. To this end, students are trained in internet based data resources as well as in a number of “state-of-the-art” computer based GIS, remote sensing, and computer cartography software programs.

 

EARTH SCIENCE MINOR

 

The earth science minor is designed to provide students with a focus on the earth and/or atmospheric sciences. The goal of this program is to enhance the curriculum of students in geography, biology, environmental sciences, archaeology and other fields with a thorough knowledge of earth and atmospheric processes. This minor will prepare students for entry-level positions in industry, business, and government, especially in the natural resources fields, and graduate programs in geography, planning, natural resources management, earth sciences, environmental sciences and ecology.

 

The increasing significance of environmental problems in daily life demand a better informed public on geoenvironmental problems and hazards and the proper planning for their mitigation. This minor will greatly improve the program of any student with an interest in the geological and atmospheric aspects of the earth’s environment.

 

 

  
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GEOARCHAEOLOGY MINOR

 

The Geoarchaeology Minor is a 22-credit interdisciplinary minor administered by the Department of Geography and Earth Science. The minor is open to students in the College of Liberal Studies and the College of Science and Allied Health. Faculty and staff from three programs at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse are involved with the Geoarchaeology Minor. They include the Geography and Earth Science Department, the Sociology/Archaeology Department, and the Mississippi Valley Archaeology Center.

 

Geoarchaeology involves the application of the earth sciences to understanding archaeological problems. Increasingly, cultural resource management involving archaeological investigations require some aspect of geoarchaeology. The Geoarchaeology Minor prepares students to undertake such investigations through interdisciplinary research which may involve archaeological site location by physical and chemical means, stratigraphic studies of archaeological sites, analysis of archaeological deposits, environmental analysis based on geomorphology and soils, and modeling the relationship between the landscape and human activities.

 

Although most students who select the minor in Geoarchaeology will be Geography majors or Archaeological Studies majors, the minor can complement several other majors in both the natural and social sciences. Other students who might be interested in the Geoarchaeology Minor may include a history major with an interest in the ancient middle east, the recreation major interested in working as a park naturalist, a physics major with an interest in geophysics, or a chemistry major with an interest in archaeological chemistry.

 

 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA

 

Students are provided the opportunity to complete requirements in a variety of pre-professional fields on the campus prior to applying to other colleges and universities for admission to their professional programs. Pre-professional program requirements vary widely; some require a degree while others do not. Students are expected to be aware of the requirements of the school to which they plan to apply; therefore, they need to select their course work carefully. Pre-professional advisers on the campus can be of assistance to students in designing a curriculum in such programs. Please contact the College of Science and Allied Health Office, 105 Graff Main Hall, for identification and office location of pre-professional advisers.

 

Pre-Architecture

Study in pre-architecture should provide a broad informational base. Students are encouraged to gain experience in mathematics, the physical and social sciences, the humanities and the fine arts. Because design depends on skills as well as information, students should also be concerned with developing skills in the areas of mathematics (through calculus), probability and statistics, computer science and verbal and visual communication.

 

Pre-Engineering

Most of the basic mathematics, chemistry and physics courses that the prospective engineer needs in the first two years of an engineering curriculum can be taken at UW-L, and a wide choice of electives is also available. In the first two years, every pre-engineer should complete three semesters of calculus, two semesters of chemistry and two semesters of physics. Since requirements vary with the engineering school and the particular major, students should see the pre-engineering adviser in the Physics Department as early as possible. The adviser can furnish information about specific majors within engineering schools. Engineering curriculums require four or more years of study; therefore, students spending the first two at La Crosse will need to spend two or more years at an engineering school to complete degree requirements.

 

Pre-Forestry (Natural Resources, Conservation, Wildlife Management)

A curriculum is available to meet the needs of the majority of students who will later major in such diverse fields as wildlife management, forestry and conservation education. However, students entering one of these fields are reminded that most forestry schools set their own requirements for admission, and thus it is imperative that exact requirements be obtained from current catalogs of the schools to which students plan to transfer to complete their professional training. Generally, the requirement for admission with junior standing to professional school is 60 semester hours.

 

In some cases students will find it advantageous to earn a bachelor’s degree before entering the professional program. Students may do so by continuing for two more academic years at UW-L and fulfilling requirements prescribed for that degree. Students electing to follow this plan should allow extra years to complete graduate work in the professional school. Students are urged to contact the university’s pre-forestry adviser early in their first semester.

 

  
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Pre-Chiropractic

Pre-chiropractic students enroll at UW-L for at least two years (60 credits) before being admitted to professional chiropractic schools, however, most students entering chiropractic programs have more than 60 credits, possibly even an undergraduate degree. Students should sample liberally from the General Education curriculum with some emphasis in biology and chemistry. Minimal academic qualifications include one year of biology, one year of general chemistry, one year of organic chemistry, one year of physics, one year of English, one semester of social science or humanities.

 

Pre-Dentistry

The usual pre-professional education requirements for admission to dental school stipulate two academic years of liberal arts study; however, many of the dental schools in the United States require three years of college education, and most prefer baccalaureate degree candidates.

 

Dental school requirements in pre-professional curricula vary but a freshman year basically includes: Chemistry 103 and 104; Biology 105 and 303; English 110; Physics 103 and 104 or 203 and 204 and a course in mathematics.

 

The pre-dentistry adviser should be consulted as to full curriculum requirements. Admission to dental school is based on grade point average, interviews, aptitude tests and letters of recommendation. An aptitude test is taken in the year preceding application to dental school.

 

Pre-Medicine

Minimal academic requirements to qualify for admission to medical school include a number of courses as part of, or in addition to, a regular academic major leading to a baccalaureate degree.

 

Pre-medicine requirements include eight semester hours in biology (general and advanced zoology); 16 semester hours of chemistry including one year of general and eight semester hours of organic; one semester of mathematics; eight semester hours of physics; and six semester hours of English. Academic preparation in all of these areas is available at UW-L. Although the majority of pre-medical students major in chemistry, biology or microbiology, the student may major in any field of interest as long as the minimal requirements are satisfied.

 

Admission to medical school is highly competitive, and admission decisions are based on factors such as overall grade point average, grade point average in the required science courses, performance on the national Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), usually taken in the spring of the junior year, non-academic credentials (activities and work experiences), letters of evaluation from faculty, and a personal interview.

 

Pre-Nursing

Students planning to enter the nursing profession may, depending on the type of degree sought, take one year of pre-nursing courses at UW-L. As several types of nursing programs are available statewide, students must contact a school offering a degree program to ensure early program planning.

 

Pre-Optometry

Students should plan to spend at least two years in undergraduate study; most successful applicants have three or four years of undergraduate work. A typical program includes Chemistry 103 and 104, Biology 105 and 303, Physics 103 and 104, or 203 and 204, English 110 and a course in mathematics. Additional courses may be needed for a pre-optometric program. Consult the adviser for complete undergraduate curriculum requirements. The Optometry Admission Test (OAT) must be taken before or during the semester in which students apply for admission to a school of optometry.

 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine

The statement in this section on pre-medicine applies equally to pre-osteopathic medicine. Medical school and osteopathic curricula are now nearly identical, and the practice of medicine by graduates of either type of school is essentially identical. Osteopathy is best considered an alternative within medicine rather than an alternative to medicine.

 

Pre-Pharmacy

Most pharmacy programs offer the so-called “Doctor of Pharmacy” degree. The programs involve a pre-pharmacy curriculum of about 70 credits that can be taken at

UW-L. The professional program that is taken at the College of Pharmacy is an additional four years. The pre-pharmacy curriculum is set by the individual colleges of pharmacy but generally consists of Chemistry 103, 104, 303, 304 and 305, Biology 105, 312, 313, 306 or 315, Physics 103 and 104, Math 207, plus non-math, non-science General Education courses.

 

It is very important to work with the pre-pharmacy adviser as program requirements are frequently changed.

 

Pre-Physical Therapy

Undergraduate students interested in physical therapy must declare an undergraduate major. However, they may select pre-professional physical therapy as a secondary area of interest. General admission requirements for the UW-La Crosse graduate program in physical therapy include: 1) an undergraduate degree or completion of an undergraduate degree within the semester of application; 2) completion of all core requirements as listed in the Graduate Catalog under Physical Therapy; 3) attainment of at least a 3.00 cumulative GPA; and 4) completion of required volunteer experiences.

 

Pre-Podiatry

A podiatrist is a medical specialist who has unlimited licensure to practice on the ankle and foot. Requirements for admission to a school of podiatric medicine are the same as those listed in the pre-medicine section.

 

Pre-Veterinary

The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers programs which will satisfy the requirements for admission to any college of veterinary medicine. The requirements include courses in biology, chemistry, physics, English composition, economics, and mathematics as well as others in the social sciences and humanities. Some schools have special requirements for admission. A “pre-vet” adviser will provide information concerning such requirements. The internship programs of the Office of Cooperative Education in cooperation with local veterinarians offer opportunities for students to fulfill the requirements for knowledge of and experience in the veterinary medical profession. Applicants to a veterinary college are also required to take both the Veterinary Aptitude Test (VAT) and/or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

 

  
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This catalog is a record of undergraduate programs, courses, policies, staff and facilities as of April 1, 2001.

Edited by Judith Holloway and Sharyn Lehrke, Records and Registration
www.uwlax.edu/records/ug-cat/index.html




Last Modified Friday, Monday, October 5, 2001
Copyright & copy; 1996 - 2001 by the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse and the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. All Rights Reserved.