eagle atop Veterans Memorial at UW-La Crosse Links to Office of Records and Registration Homepage Links back to UW-L Homepage Links to Records Office and UW-L main home pages
Links to Undergrad/Grad Catalogs Undergradaute & Graduate Catalogs Banner & link
Links to Current Students HomepageLinks to Contact Info for Records & Registration StaffLinks to How to Register for ClassesLinks to Transcript Services

Table of Contents| Academic Programs by College| Campus Information Notes to Students | General Information | Admission to the University | Expenses and Financial Aid | The Campus | Services and Involvement | Academic Regulations and Student Conduct | Degree Requirements | Colleges & Schools |Undergraduate Course and Program Descriptions | Administrative, Faculty and Staff listings | Calendar | Campus Map 

Recreation Management
and
 Therapeutic Recreation (REC/RTH)
 

College of Science and Allied Health
Department Chair: George Arimond
128 Wittich Hall, 608-785-8207
e-mail: arimond.geor@uwlax.edu
 www.uwlax.edu/RMTR  

Professors: Arimond, Navar, Simpson;
Associate Professors: Holland, Murray, Wadell;
 
Assistant Professors: Ardovino, Trokan, Toupence. 

Exercise Science, Health, and Recreation Transfer Policy

UW-La Crosse students transferring into ESHR programs must have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher at the time of transfer.  

Recreation Management Major (Exercise Science, Health, and Recreation) — 53 credits 

Core requirements: REC 100, 200, 300, 302, 304, 305, 320, 340, 400, 401, 402, 420, 449, 450; RTH 325. 

Electives: 3 credits required: Choose from REC 202, 375, 380, 381; RTH 474. 

Interdisciplinary requirements — 26 credits: ENV 201 or GEO 200, POL 102, C-S 101, PSY 212, ECO 110, ENG 307, ACC 221 or 235, MTH 145.

 All majors in recreation management must pass all required REC and RTH courses with a grade of “C” or better.

All majors, prior to enrollment in REC 449, also must complete the 25-hour underclass pre-professional experience requirement and the junior-level 50-hour experience requirement. These are non-class field experiences at recreation management agencies. Please see your faculty adviser for information about qualifying experiences.           

Therapeutic Recreation (Exercise Science, Health, and Recreation) — 61 credits, excluding pre-professional core. 

Pre-professional core requirements: 18-39 credits, including General Education requirements BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100, C-S 101, CST 110, ENG 110, MTH 145 or 250, PSY 100; additional courses: ESS 205, PSY 212, REC 100, REC 200, RTH 250, 326 or 327. 

Professional core requirements: 56 credits including PSY 304, 343, REC 302, RTH 326 or 327 (whichever was not completed for pre-professional requirement), RTH 252, 456, 355, 462, 470, 476, 480, 493, 496, 498. 

Electives: 5-6 credits are required; select at least 3 credits from list 1.

1.   RTH 330, 332, 333 345, 483

2.   ESS 231, 233, 303, 323; HED 205, 230, 345, 346, 409, 412, 417, 418, 422, 469, 472, 485; PSY 285, 305, 310, 311, 312, 318, 347, 401, 417; RTH 203, 204, 215, 474, 495, 497; REC 430 

A.  Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.50 or greater to enter the program.       

B.  Students should obtain a therapeutic recreation faculty adviser as early as possible while taking pre-professional courses.

C.  Before enrolling in professional courses for the therapeutic recreation major, the following minimum requirements must be met:

1.  all pre-professional course requirements must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

2. cumulative GPA of at least 2.5

3. fifty hours of pre-professional volunteer therapeutic recreation experience must be documented. (See faculty adviser about qualifying experiences.)

4.  complete application to therapeutic recreation professional program.

D.  Therapeutic recreation majors must pass all professional core and required electives with a grade of “C” or better.

E.   Appropriate RTH 490 or 491 workshops will apply. Approval from the therapeutic recreation program director must be received prior to enrollment.

F.   Transfer students with associate degrees should consult the therapeutic recreation program director to ensure fulfillment of requirements. 

 

Recreation Management Minor(All colleges; those students majoring in therapeutic recreation, however, have different requirements than students in other majors. Therapeutic recreation students should see special requirements below.) — 19 credits including REC 100, 200, 300, 302; RTH 325; five credits of electives chosen from REC 202, 205, 207, 304, 305, 306, 320, 340, 375, 380, 381, 400, 401, 402, 403, 420, 430, 491, 495, 497, 499, RTH 462. Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.50 or greater to enter the program. 

Recreation Management Minor for Therapeutic Recreation Majors—19 credits, including REC 100, 200, 302, 320, 401. Four credits of electives chosen from REC 202, 205, 207, 300, 304, 305, 306, 340, 375, 380, 381, 400, 402, 403, 404, 420, 430, 491, 495, 497, 499, RTH 462. Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.50 or greater to enter the program. 

The recreation management/therapeutic recreation department incorporates a significant amount of writing through the required courses instead of identifying particular courses as writing emphasis courses. Students who complete one of the majors in the department will fulfill the university writing emphasis requirement. 

 

Recreation Management (REC) 

Recreation Management/Therapeutic Recreation

Course Availability:  The following classes are open to all students in all majors: REC 100, 207, 306, 381, RTH 203, 204, 215, 216, 217, 218, 250, 325, 326, 327, 345, 355, 462, 474. The following classes are open only to therapeutic recreation majors: RTH 260, 265, 330, 332, 333 (also open to child/youth care emphasis students), 452, 456, 470, 476, 480 (also open to gerontology emphasis students), 483, 490, 491, 493, 495, 496, 497, 498. The remaining REC/RTH classes are open only to recreation management majors or minors or therapeutic recreation majors. 

+ above a course number indicates a
General Education course.

REC   100   Cr. 3
Foundations of Recreation
Review of the sociological, philosophical, economic, and historical aspects of recreation and leisure. An introduction to recreation as a profession and investigation of contemporary issues in recreation and leisure. 

+
HPR   105   Cr. 3
Creating a Healthy, Active Lifestyle
This course will focus on the knowledge and skills necessary for the appreciation and enhancement of a healthful lifestyle throughout the life span. Major health issues, physical fitness, movement skills and effective use of leisure will be explored. 

HPR/H-P  106 Cr. 2
Introduction to Health Related Careers
Overview of health related professions in the health delivery system. Course will include educational and professional aspects of a broad range of health related careers. General topics will include an overview of the health related delivery system, health reform, legal and ethical issues, and professionalism. An interdisciplinary approach will be utilized to present specific information on individual health related professions. (Cross-listed with H-P; may only earn credit in HPR or H-P.) 

REC   200   Cr. 3
Program Leadership of  Recreation Activities

An introduction to leadership techniques and theory as it relates to direct leadership of recreation activities. Development of skills for organizing and leading specific recreation activities, including cooperative games and group initiatives. Prerequisite: REC 100 or concurrent enrollment.
 

REC   202   Cr. 3
Outdoor Recreation Skills
An introduction to a variety of outdoor recreation skills and activities associated with the natural environment. The emphasis is on participation and leadership in “lifetime” activity that occurs in the out-of-doors. Emphasis will be placed on proper ethics in the wilderness and the natural environment. A field trip will be required. Prerequisite: REC 100. (Not open to those with credit for RTH 203.)* 

REC   205   Cr. 2
Camp Leadership
Camp Leadership is designed as a practical approach to the management of a camp. This course will familiarize the student with the organization and administrative skills needed to manage a camp. Analysis of various types of camp sponsorship, principles, techniques, resources, leadership and group behavior will be addressed. Specific aspects of camping will be addressed and explored including: food, lodging, transportation, site development, programming, personnel, public relations, sanitation, finance, legal liability, health and safety. Offered occasionally. 

REC   207   Cr. 1
Experiential Education:  Introduction to a Ropes Course
This course will focus on the participatory experience and benefits of using group initiatives, low elements and high elements of a ropes course. A ropes course is a series of problem-solving events which must be negotiated in order to achieve a determined goal. The events are constructed of telephone poles and cables that vary in height from one foot to forty feet off the ground. The ropes course will enable participants to grow by creating experiences that foster individual and group development. Course prerequisite: students must provide a Statement of Health and complete and sign an Assumption of Risk/Waiver. Pass/Fail grading. Offered occasionally. 

REC   300   Cr. 3
Program Planning in Recreation
This course provides practical knowledge and experiences on the essential elements and design concepts of program planning. Emphasis is placed on student involvement in planning and directing programs for diverse populations in a variety of physical settings. 

REC   302   Cr. 3
Recreation Leadership and Supervision
Study of theories and techniques in leadership, group dynamics, and personnel management as they relate to programming and staff supervision in recreation agencies. Emphasis on personnel management techniques, including job analysis, recruitment, selection training, motivation, career development, and evaluation of paid staff and volunteers. Course includes issues common to full-time entry-level professional positions in recreation. Prerequisite: REC 100, junior standing. 

REC   304   Cr. 3
Maintenance of Park and Outdoor Recreation Areas
Introduction to the many aspects of maintaining parks and outdoor recreation areas. Prerequisite: junior standing.  

REC   305  Cr. 2
Operation and Management of Swimming Pools and Spas
The efficient operation and management of swimming pools, spas, and other aquatic facilities. The promotion of attractive aquatic programs. Prerequisite: junior standing.  

REC   306  Cr. 3
Outdoor Recreation and the Natural Resources
This course provides an overview of the natural resources used for outdoor recreational pursuits, an analysis of leisure activities dependent upon natural resources, a presentation of the problems of recreational land use and an introduction to environmental awareness and outdoor safety. Recreation and natural resources at the national, state, local and private levels will be addressed with emphasis on the understanding of how outdoor recreation affects and is affected by natural resources. Offered occasionally. 

REC   320  Cr. 3
Enterprises in Commercial Recreation and Tourism
An introduction to the scope, characteristics and management aspects of tourism and the private (for-profit) sector of recreation. The course provides a basic understanding of entrepreneurship and management of a small retail recreation business. It also examines the nature and scope of tourism as well as the future development and evolution of tourism. 

REC   340   Cr. 3
Evaluation Methods and Practices
This course is designed to familiarize the student with basic measurement and evaluation methods used in recreation and leisure service field. In addition, the course shows students how to interpret current and future research findings in leisure and recreation journals, use basic quantitative and qualitative survey methods, interpret findings from commonly used research and statistical methods, and form conclusions and recommendations from survey findings. Prerequisite: MTH 145 or 250. 

REC   375 Cr. 1-3
Workshop in Recreation Management
This is a group study of various recreation, leisure, or tourism topics. University professors and/or visiting lecturers will conduct the workshops. Repeatable for credit under different subtitles, but no student may earn more than six credits in REC 375, RTH 490 and REC/RTH 491. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6. Offered occasionally. May require field trip. *  

REC   380   Cr. 3
Outdoor Education
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to explore a variety of subjects associated with outdoor education. Class emphasis will be placed on appreciation of natural resources, preservation of the natural environment, awareness and appreciation of the urban environment and techniques for interpreting the environment to the public. *Offered occasionally. 

REC   381 Cr. 1-3
Outdoor Pursuits
This course is designed to provide skill development and leadership techniques in outdoor recreation activities commonly associated with wilderness and roadless areas. Emphasis on backcountry ethics and safety will be stressed. A field trip will be required. Examples: backpacking, canoeing, bicycling, rock climbing/rappelling, fishing, camping, cross country skiing. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6.* 

REC   400   Cr. 3
Planning for Park and Recreation Facilities
Designed to equip the student with the basic knowledge necessary to understand and implement the planning process in the development of park and recreation facilities. This course is also designed to familiarize the student with federal, state and local statutes, and other related documents (U.S. Census, Wisconsin Administrative Codes, county and municipal ordinances). Prerequisite: REC 300 and ENG 307.  

REC   401   Cr. 3
Management in Park and Recreation Resources
Designed to equip the student with the basic knowledge and abilities necessary to administer a public, not-for-profit, or a commercial leisure service organization or a division of a leisure service organization. Emphasis will be placed on management functions as they relate to the leisure service organization. Prerequisite: REC 302. 

REC   402/502 Cr. 3
Risk Management in Leisure Service Organizations
This course will identify the primary components of risk management as it deals with the legal aspects of tort liability and contracts in leisure service organizations. It is designed to equip the student with the basic knowledge necessary to understand and manage legal risks associated with leisure service organizations. Prerequisite: REC 401. 

REC   403   Cr. 2
Management of Special Facilities and Areas
An exposure to and study of specialized facilities and areas within the public and commercial sectors of recreation. Facilities studied include golf courses, marinas, beaches, indoor and outdoor skating rinks, downhill, and cross country ski areas, and cemeteries. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered occasionally. 

REC   420/520 Cr. 3
Commercial Recreation Management
Covers business management techniques and skills currently used in the private (for-profit) sector of recreation. Emphasis is on business formation strategies, methods of capitalization, market planning, pricing, and financial management. Prerequisite: REC 320 and ACC 221 or 235. 

REC   430/530 Cr. 1
Introduction to American Sign Language
This course is a basic introduction into American Sign Language (ASL), designed to familiarize the student with the basic structural characteristics of American Sign Language and the basic of finger spelling. Vocabulary taught includes getting acquainted, school, and emergency health situations. The origins of ASL and aspects of deaf culture are addressed. The deaf culture topics concentrate on how the hearing person can interact more appropriately with the deaf community. This course is for any person who may occasionally interact with the deaf either personally or professionally. 

REC   449   Cr. 1
Internship/Professional Preparation
In-depth coverage of the requirements for REC 450 internship and preparation of students for a smooth transition to the recreation management profession. Prerequisite: recreation management major with senior standing, completion of 25-hour underclass pre-professional experience requirement and the junior level 50-hour experience requirement, a minimum GPA of 2.50, and completion or concurrent enrollment in all remaining REC/RTH 200- and 300-level required courses.  

REC   450 Cr. 12
Internship
Internship with a university approved recreation business or agency. An on-site practitioner and university faculty supervisor closely supervise the student’s progress. The student experiences a smooth transition form university academics to the recreation management profession. Approved sites include: public sector (e.g., parks and recreation agencies, public schools and universities); non-profit/private sector (e.g., voluntary and youth agencies, church organizations); and for-profit sector (e.g., fitness/sport centers, hospitality, tourism, and retail businesses). Prerequisite: REC 449, declared recreation management major, senior standing, 2.50 cumulative GPA or 3.00 for placement outside of 250-mile radius, all required REC/RTH courses completed, American Red Cross Standard First Aid and CPR certification (must be current throughout the REC450 experience). 

REC   491/591 Cr. 1-3
Workshop in Recreation Management
Group study of varying recreation and parks topics. University professors as well as visiting lecturers will be invited to address the students and conduct specialized phases of the workshops. Repeatable for credit under different subtitles. No student may earn more than six credits in REC 375, RTH 490, and REC/RTH 491. 

REC   495 Cr. 1-3
Independent Study in Recreation
Individualized study of areas not available in existing courses. Prerequisite: junior standing, consent of departmental staff and chairperson. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6. 

REC   497 Cr. 1-3
Special Projects in Recreation Management

Individualized study of areas not available in existing courses or independent study. Program Project: planning, implementation and evaluation of a project. These projects will be completed under the supervision and direction of a staff member with permission from the student’s adviser within the department. Examples include Camp Placement Day, Riverfest, and Oktoberfest events. Prerequisite: junior standing, consent of chairperson and student’s adviser, REC 300 or RTH 458. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6.
 

REC   499 Cr. 1-3
Seminar in Recreation and Parks
Intensive study of some specific area of interest in recreation. Open to students with 2.75 grade point average and senior standing. Repeatable for credit — maximum 3. 

*One of the following courses will be offered each semester: REC 202, 375, 380, 381, and RTH 474

 

Therapeutic Recreation (RTH) 

Recreation Management/ Therapeutic Recreation Course Availability: 

The following classes are open to all students in all majors: REC 100, 207, 306, 381, RTH 203, 204, 215, 216, 217, 218, 250, 325, 326, 327, 345, 355, 462, 474. The following classes are open only to therapeutic recreation majors: RTH 260, 265, 330, 332, 333 (also open to child/youth care emphasis students), 452, 456, 470, 476, 480 (also open to gerontology emphasis students), 483, 490, 491, 493, 495, 496, 497, 498. The remaining REC/RTH classes are open only to recreation management majors or minors or therapeutic recreation majors. 

RTH   203   Cr. 3
Outdoor Recreation Skills for Persons with Special Needs
This course is an introduction to a variety of outdoor recreation skills. Personal proficiency development in outdoor recreation skills and activities are emphasized as they relate to persons with disabilities. Prerequisite: REC 100. (Not open to those with credit for REC 202.) Offered occasionally. 

RTH   204   Cr. 2
Multicultural Crafts and Folk Art
An exploration of the therapeutic dimensions of art making, through the traditional crafts and folk arts of many cultures. Students will learn to master several different folk art techniques and adapt them to personal use. Offered occasionally.

RTH   215   Cr. 1
Adapted Aquatic Activities
This course is designed to familiarize the student with training, teaching and assisting techniques when implementing, planning and conducting recreational aquatic activities for persons with disabilities. Water games and general activities which can be conducted in the aquatic environment will be included in this course. Offered occasionally. 

RTH   216 Cr. 1-2
Skiing Techniques for Persons with Physical and Visual Impairments
This course provides the student with information regarding downhill skiing programs for persons with physical and visual impairments. Students must be at least an advanced beginner downhill skier; specific ski techniques and equipment will be used in class. Offered occasionally. 

RTH   217   Cr. 1
Organization and Coaching in Special Olympics
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for the student to prepare for eligibility as a Certified Special Olympics Coach. The course provides an overview of the Special Olympics Programs and how programs are initiated. Offered occasionally. 

RTH   218   Cr. 1
Program Development in Special Olympics
An opportunity in planning, implementation and evaluation of a local area Special Olympics Program. Offered occasionally. 

RTH   250   Cr. 3
Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation
This course is designed as an introduction to the history and foundations of therapeutic recreation. Models of health care/human services and therapeutic recreation are presented. Students will gain knowledge of services and settings; professional, legal and community resources; professional and ethical behavior. Prerequisite: REC 100 (may be taken concurrently with REC 100 if student has earned 30 credits or more.) 

RTH   252   Cr. 3
Innovative Activities  in Therapeutic Recreation
This course acquaints students who will work with persons with disabilities and special needs in therapeutic recreation settings with various recreation activities to enhance functional skills and foster meaningful recreation participation. Activity selection, analysis, planning, and modifications will be combined with various leadership styles. Prerequisite: RTH 250 or concurrent enrollment. 

RTH   260 Cr. 1-2
Assistive Devices and Resources in Therapeutic Recreation
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the current new devices/equipment/supplies and resource centers available to clientele in need of special assistive devices/supplies. This course is also designed to familiarize the practitioner with devices which can be utilized in recreational program pursuits, as well as assisting the special populations in activities of daily living. Offered occasionally. 

RTH   265 Cr. 1-2
Practical Considerations in Therapeutic Recreation
Practical information, creative concepts for programming, use of volunteers, staff relationships, burn-out, leisure education, job searching, interviewing techniques along with “hands-on” experience in various recreational settings will be presented in this course. Offered occasionally. 

RTH   325   Cr. 2
Inclusive Recreation
This course is designed to provide the student with information regarding the general techniques and guidelines for planning and implementing recreational activities for persons with disabilities in non-institutional settings. The course will present general background, characteristics of disabling conditions, legislation, and program adaptations. Prerequisite: REC 200. 

RTH   326   Cr. 3
Therapeutic Recreation Populations I
This course provides knowledge of illnesses and disabilities, including etiology, characteristics, abilities, potentials and limitations. Programming guidelines include adaptations and techniques for inclusion in therapeutic recreation services and the community. The following groups are included: persons with developmental disabilities, older adults, general and medical/surgical patients, persons with cancer, AIDS, sensory impairments, correctional clients and others. RTH 326 may precede or follow RTH 327. Prerequisite: RTH 250 or concurrent enrollment. Offered Sem. II. 

RTH   327   Cr. 3
Therapeutic Recreation Populations II
This course provides knowledge of illness and disabilities, including etiology, characteristics, abilities, potentials and limitations. Programming guidelines include adaptations and techniques for inclusion in therapeutic recreation services and the community. The following groups are included: persons with physical disabilities, addictions, psychiatric diagnoses, and others. RTH 327 may precede or follow RTH 326. Prerequisite: RTH 250 or concurrent enrollment. Offered Sem. I. 

RTH   330   Cr. 3
Therapeutic Recreation and Mental Health
This course is designed to provide students with information regarding therapeutic recreation services to persons with psychiatric problems. Programming considerations will include prevention strategies and treatment concerns. Prerequisite: RTH 250, 326 or 327. 

RTH   332   Cr. 3
Therapeutic Recreation for Persons with Physical Disabilities
This course is designed to provide students with information relating to therapeutic recreation services for individuals with physical disabilities. Programming considerations will include treatment concerns, community inclusion, wheelchair sports and leisure activities. Prerequisite: RTH 250, 326 or 327. Offered occasionally.  

RTH   333   Cr. 3
Therapeutic Recreation and Corrections
This course provides an overview of the use of leisure and recreation for individuals in correctional settings. The following topics are addressed: settings, psychiatric disorders, laws/juvenile codes, intervention strategies, activity adaptations, current trends and the criminal justice system. Functional improvement, leisure education and recreation participation are the focus of therapeutic recreation services. Prerequisite: RTH 250 or 325. Offered Sem. I. 

RTH   345   Cr. 3
Leisure in Gerontology
This course is designed to offer experience and theory in gerontology as it relates to leisure; current trends and projections of older adults, as they search for a meaningful existence will be discussed. Offered occasionally. 

RTH   355   Cr. 3
Medical Language
An introduction to medical terminology with emphasis on word roots, combining forms, prefixes and suffixes through the various systems. There is also a unit on basic pharmacology. Prerequisite: ESS 205 and RTH 326 or 327.
 

RTH   456/556 Cr. 3
Program Design and Administration of Therapeutic Recreation
This course is designed to present a rationale and foundation for systematic program design, program implementation and program evaluation in various therapeutic recreation settings. Prerequisite: MTH 145 or 250, RTH 326 or 327; Admission to TR program.  

RTH   462/562 Cr. 2-3
Inclusive Recreation Program Administration
This course is designed to provide the student with information relating to recreation in inclusive settings. General Administration concepts, management concepts, advocacy, legislation, and therapeutic recreation as a related service in the schools will receive special emphasis in this course. Prerequisite: RTH 325 or 326 or 327. Offered Sem. II. 

RTH   470/570 Cr. 3
Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation
This course presents an overview of concepts and interaction techniques used in the provision of goal-oriented therapeutic recreation services. Included are counseling techniques, leadership and instructional techniques appropriate for use in treatment, leisure education and recreation participation. Prerequisite: MTH 145 or 250, RTH 326 or 327, RTH 456 or concurrent enrollment. 

RTH   474/574 Cr. 3
Experiential Education: Facilitation Techniques for a Ropes Course
This course is designed to present in-depth information, skills and knowledge of the concepts and facilitation techniques used in experiential education. This course is primarily designed using the ropes and challenge course on the UW-L campus. Prerequisite: students must provide a statement of health and complete an assumption of risk/waiver.*  

RTH   476/576 Cr. 3
Assessment and Treatment  Planning in Therapeutic Recreation
Overview of individual client assessments used in therapeutic recreation practice; development of individualized treatment/program plans in a therapeutic recreation context; review resources, standards and issues related to client assessment and program planning in therapy, leisure education and recreation participation programs. Prerequisite: RTH 456, 470. 

RTH   480/580 Cr. 3
Leisure Education
This course is designed to provide a philosophical understanding and overview of leisure education as well as to emphasize the approaches and strategies that can be utilized in enabling people to enhance the quality of their own lives in leisure. The focus will be leisure education as a major component of therapeutic recreation services. Topics included are leisure theory, leisure education conceptual models, leisure education programming techniques, facilitation of leisure education groups for various ages. Prerequisite: RTH 456, 470. Gerontology students should have completed one core gerontology course and have permission from the director of therapeutic recreation. 

RTH   483/583 Cr. 3
Leisure Counseling in Therapeutic Recreation
A course designed to demonstrate how leisure counseling has become an important phase of therapeutic recreation services. Students will practice intermediate level counseling skills. They will be able to conceptualize and implement leisure counseling services from assessment stage, implementation stages (both individual and group), to evaluation and referral stages. Students will learn strategies for dealing with different types of leisure-related problems. Prerequisite: RTH 470, 480. 

RTH   490 Cr. 1-3
Workshop in Therapeutic Recreation
Group study of varying therapeutic recreation topics. University professors as well as visiting lecturers will be invited to address the students and conduct specialized phases of the workshops. Repeatable for credit under different subtitles. No student may earn more than six credits in REC 375, RTH 490, REC/RTH 491. Offered occasionally.  

RTH   491/591 Cr. 1-3
Workshop in Therapeutic Recreation
Group study of varying therapeutic recreation topics. University professors as well as visiting lecturers will be invited to address the students and conduct specialized phases of the workshops. Repeatable for credit under different subtitles. No student may earn more than six credits in REC 375, RTH 490, REC/RTH 491. 

RTH   493/593 Cr. 3
Therapeutic Recreation  Trends and Issues
This course provides an examination of current issues, trends and professionalization concerns in therapeutic recreation, including professional organizations, ethics, current legislation, professional development, professional standards, credentialing, accreditation standards, improving organizational performance, and current professional controversies. Course should be taken the last semester prior to internship. Prerequisite: MTH 145 or 250, RTH 456. 

RTH   495 Cr. 1-3
Independent Study  in Therapeutic Recreation
Individualized study of areas not available in existing courses. Prerequisite: consent of chairperson and/or director of therapeutic recreation. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6. 

RTH   496   Cr. 1
Orientation to Internship in Therapeutic Recreation
Orientation and preparation to the required senior internship. Course should be taken one or two semesters prior to enrollment in RTH 498. Prerequisite: Accepted into the therapeutic recreation major, junior standing, 50 hours of pre-internship experience must be verified with at least a satisfactory rating prior to enrolling. Pass/Fail grading.  

RTH   497 Cr. 1-3
Special Projects in Therapeutic Recreation
Individualized study areas not available in existing courses or Independent Study. Program Project: the planning, implementation and evaluation of a project. These projects will be completed under the supervision and direction of a staff member with permission from the student’s adviser within the department. Examples: wheelchair sports/coaching, wheel-a-thon, special recreation programs, Special Olympics, wheelchair dancing and other events. Prerequisite: junior standing, consent of instructor, student’s adviser, REC 300 or RTH 456. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6. 

RTH   498 Cr. 12 or 16
Internship in Therapeutic Recreation
Application of the methods and techniques of therapeutic recreation, leadership, program development and administration through a supervised internship experience in therapeutic recreation, special recreation, leisure education and/or treatment programs. Prerequisite: declared therapeutic recreation major, senior standing, 2.50 cumulative GPA or 3.00 outside of 250 mile radius, all required REC/RTH courses completed, American Red Cross Standard First Aid certification or its equivalent must be current throughout the RTH 498 experience.

BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS

UW-L Homepage | Office of Records and Registration Homepage | How to Contact Us | How to Register  
How to Request Transcript | Undergrad/Grad Catalogs | Timetables/Course Listings | Enrollment Verifications
Veterans Certification | F.E.R.P.A. | Transfer Information System | Re-entry Applications | Enrollment Statistics  
Faculty Services | Graduation Ceremonies | Current Students Homepage


Last Modified:August 25, 2008
comments To: records@uwlax.edu
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse  1725 State Street  La Crosse, WI  54601  608.785.8000
All material Copyright© 2002 by the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System