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Sociology/ Archaeology (SOC/ARC)  

College of Liberal Studies
Department Chair: Kimberly Vogt
435A Wimberly Hall, 608-785-8457
e-mail: vogt.kimb@uwlax.edu 

www.uwlax.edu/sociology
 

 

Professors: Bulk, Cox, Gedicks, Lloyd, Smith, S., Theler, Tiffany, Vogt, Zollweg; 
Associate Professors:
Delgado, Gongaware, McAndrews, Miller, C.;
 
Lecturer: Thornton 

Sociology Major (All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 36 credits, including SOC 110, 200, 250, 350, 390 or 395, 405 or 416. The remaining 18 credits will consist of sociology electives to be selected in consultation with a faculty adviser in sociology.  Nine of the 18 elective credits must be taken at the 300-level or above. Up to six credits in anthropology may be included in the sociology major if taken at the 200-level or above. Anthropology credits applied to the sociology major cannot be applied to the anthropology minor or archaeological studies major. To declare a major in sociology, a student must have completed 15 credits and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.30. 

Sociology Major (Teacher Certification programs) — 36 credits, including SOC 110, 200, 250, 350, 390 or 395, 405 or 416 and at least one course from each of the following areas:

A. Social organization and processes: SOC 212, 216, 240, 260, 310, 311, 315, 338, 370, 420

B. Social psychology: SOC 325, 330, 334 (or CST 250 or PSY 343), 335

C. Comparative sociology and anthropology: SOC 225, 480 or any course in anthropology

D. Social problems and social change: SOC 120, 313, 320, 321, 322, 324, 326, 340, 422, 429, 475

E. Remaining electives may be selected from any of the course offerings in sociology. Up to six credits in anthropology may be applied toward the sociology major. Anthropology credits applied to the sociology major cannot be applied to the anthropology minor or archaeological studies major. GEO 200, EFN 200 and C-I 381 also are required. 

Note: To enroll in SOC 200 and SOC 250, a student must have declared sociology as a major. Once a student has declared sociology as a major, it likely will take a minimum of four semesters to complete the core required course sequence.

            We encourage students to consider internships, volunteer work, and undergraduate research projects as an important part of their sociological training. The sociology major provides a solid background in the liberal arts, theory, and research methods. Students should work closely with their advisers in selecting elective courses and a minor that can help them toward their career goals.  

Sociology Honors Program
The sociology honors program is designed to stimulate and acknowledge work of greater depth, breadth and originality by students whose interest and resources make them eligible for this voluntary program.

I.   Admission
    A. Junior standing
    B. Twelve credits in the major
    C.  A 3.50 grade point average in the major
    D. A 3.25 cumulative grade point average overall
    E.  Recommendation of two faculty members in the major submitted to the chair

II.  Program
A. Completion of the regular major program
B.  SOC 410

III.  Evaluation
A. A 3.50 grade point average in the major at graduation
B.  Presentation of paper from SOC 410 to a colloquium of faculty and students in the major A grade of “A”, “AB”, or “B” in SOC 410  

Archaeological Studies Major (All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — Undergraduate students may declare their major as pre-archaeological studies majors. Only those students who have been admitted to the program are classified as archaeological studies majors. Admission to the major is limited and based upon the following minimal requirements. 

Entrance requirements:

A. Prior to application for the major, the following archaeology courses must be completed with a minimum GPA of 3.00: ARC 195, ARC 200, and two other 200- or 300-level archaeology courses

B. An overall GPA of 2.50 for all university work completed

C. Completion of 32 credits

D. Completion of the archaeological studies major application form 

Major requirements:

A.     Required courses: ARC 195, 200, 455, 499 and a minimum of 6 credits of ARC 402.

B. Six credits (at least two courses) from: ARC 204, 205, 275, 280, 310, 320, 350. 367, 404, 409, 498; ARC/ANT 285, 315, 353, 399; ARC/HIS 331, 332, 340, 365, 366; INS 350.

C. Six credits (at least two courses) from: ARC 250, 300, 395, 403, 445, 450, 498; ANT/ARC 334, 399, 454; GEO/ESC 323, 343, 345, 390, 426, 481

D. Six credits (at least two courses) from: ANT 203, 250, 342, 343, 350, 352, 355, 409, 444, 499; ARC/ANT 304, 305, 399; ANT/SOC 300, 354

 Anthropology credits applied to the archaeological studies major may not be applied to the anthropology minor or the sociology major or minor. 

Honors program in Archaeology   This program is not to be confused with University Honors which is a separate entity — you can receive honors credit in archaeology only by taking the program in our department.  

We strongly urge you to consider participating in the archaeology honors program. It is a fine and important addition to your vitae when you seek a graduate school or a job. 

I.   Admission
A. Junior standing
B. 12 credits completed in the archaeology major 3.50 cumulative grade point in the archaeology major
C. A 3.25 cumulative grade point average overall
D. Recommendation of two faculty members in the archaeology program submitted to the archaeology/anthropology section head

II.  Program
A. ARC 445 Research Methods in Archaeology with a grade of AB or higher       
B. ARC 455 Archaeological Theory with a grade of AB or higher

III.    Evaluation
A. A grade point average of 3.50 in the archaeology major at graduation
B. Submission and acceptance of a  thesis in ARC 499, as specified in  the senior project/thesis guidelines
C. Presentation of a paper from ARC 499 to a colloquium of faculty  and students in the major
D. Completion of the honors program in archaeology evaluation form and submitted to the Sociology/ Archaeology department program         assistant. 

Sociology Minor (All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 21 credits, including SOC 110 and electives in sociology. Twelve of the 21 credits must be at the 300-level or above.  Up to six credits in anthropology may be included in the sociology minor if taken at the 200-level and above. Anthropology credits applied to the sociology major or minor cannot be applied to the anthropology minor or archeological studies major.  

Sociology Minor (Teacher Certification programs) — 22 credits, including SOC 110, 395; one course from SOC 212, 216, 310, 311, 315, 338; one course from SOC 120, 225, 320, 321, 322, 326, 340; and either SOC 330 or 334 (or CST 250 or PSY 343). One course from anthropology may be included if taken at the 200-level or above.  Twelve of the 22 credits must be at the 300-level or above. Anthropology credits applied to the sociology minor cannot be applied to the anthropology minor or archaeological studies major. GEO 200, EFN 200 and C-I 381 also are required.  

Anthropology Minor (All colleges, excluding Teacher Certification programs) — 21 credits, including ANT 101, 202, ANT/ARC 454 and electives in anthropology. Up to nine credits in archaeology and/or six credits in sociology above the 100 level may be applied. Anthropology credits applied to the archaeology major, the sociology major or the sociology minor may not be applied to the anthropology minor.

Criminal Justice Minor (All colleges) — 21 credits, including SOC 324; six credits from: SOC 313, 321, 322, 325, 326, 330, 429; six credits from: POL 211, 221, 222, 306, 311, 326, 373, 374; three credits from: GEO/ESC 481, PHL 201, 337, PSY 304, 311, 330, 341, 417, 426, W-S 320. The remaining three credits are elective credits and may be selected from any of the courses listed above or three credits from POL 451 or SOC 451. Note: A maximum of three credits may be counted toward the fulfillment of the criminal justice minor and another major, minor or emphasis. 

Social Studies Major (Broadfield)  (Teacher Certification programs) — See description of this broadfield major on p. 108. 

The sociology/archaeology department incorporates a significant amount of writing through the required courses instead of identifying particular courses as writing emphasis courses. Students who complete one of the majors in the department will fulfill the university writing emphasis requirement. 

Sociology (SOC) 

+ above a course number indicates a
General Education course. 

+
SOC   110   Cr. 3
The Social World
An analysis of the complex relationship between society, the individual and the physical environment. It examines such questions as: how social patterns develop and persist over time; how the individual is shaped by social, cultural and environmental factors; why societies are constantly changing; and how individuals, through social interaction, shape their social world. Cross-cultural comparisons will be emphasized, showing how society and the physical environment affect the life choices of individuals. 

+
SOC   120   Cr. 3
Social Problems
Social analysis, critical thinking, and problem solving are introduced as basic social science skills. These skills are applied to major contemporary social problems related to deviant behavior, social inequality, social change, and problems associated with major societal institutions. A variety of individual and collective responses and social policy strategies at local, national, and international levels are examined.

SOC   200   Cr. 3
Foundations of Sociological Analysis
This course focuses on: (1) the core concepts of thinking sociologically, including deeper comprehension of core sociological perspectives and concepts; (2) the formulation of sociological questions; (3) understanding the scientific methods in sociology; and (4) the formulation of research questions and composition of sociology papers. An emphasis will be placed on providing students with writing experiences in all aspects of the course. Sociology majors should take this course as soon as possible after completing SOC 110. Prerequisites: SOC 110. Open to sociology majors only. 

+
SOC   202   Cr. 3
Contemporary Global Issues
This course will offer a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the Global Society as it enters the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern Global Society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science and history. (Cross-listed with ANT/ECO/GEO/POL/HIS 202; may only earn credit in one department.) 

SOC   212   Cr. 3
Marriage and Family
An investigation into the many facets of love and how marriage and family experiences typically alter the nature of marital intimacy. The social construction of our sexual identities is also explored as well as the significance of this process to our quality of life. The major course emphasis is given to understanding the contemporary institutions of marriage and family, and the changes that these institutions are now experiencing.  

SOC   216   Cr. 3
Society and Schools
A social analysis and review of research on the school as a learning environment, a social organization and a societal institution. Specific topics include classroom interaction, school social climate, social inequalities in the schools, and selected educational controversies.  

+
SOC   225   Cr. 3
Racial and Ethnic Minorities 
An investigation into the social dynamics shaping racial and ethnic minority experience in America. Processes of prejudice formation and prejudice reduction are discussed. The nature of institutional discrimination and institutional racism is analyzed in proper socio-historical context. Minority group achievements and legacies are emphasized. Contemporary issues and assessment of minority group progress in America are vigorously examined.  


SOC   240   Cr. 3
Sociology of Sport and Leisure
An investigation of the interrelationship between sports/leisure time activities and society’s social structure; its institutions and culture. Special emphasis is on the role social structure plays in the formation of values and attitudes related to sports and leisure time activities.  

SOC   250   Cr. 3
Methods of Social Research I
This course introduces students to principles and procedures for the quantitative measurement of social phenomena. It emphasizes interpretation and uses of quantitative techniques in sociological data analysis. The primary goal is to provide students with skills and practical application of techniques used to understand how sociologists measure, evaluate and use individual and social indicators such as socioeconomic status, residential segregation, and crime statistics. The department strongly encourages students to take SOC 200 and SOC 250 concurrently. Prerequisite: SOC 110. Open to sociology majors only. 

SOC   260   Cr. 3
Aging: Sociological Perspectives
This course explores the myths and realities of aging as individual, social and cultural processes. A major emphasis addresses contemporary issues which confront the public and the aged in the U.S. The issue areas include family relationships, work and retirement, income, leisure, living arrangements, and political participation. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or  ANT 101. 

SOC/ERS  280            Cr. 3
Hmong Americans
This course provides an introductory overview of Hmong history, culture, and contemporary adaptation in the United States of America. Areas of exploration will include ancient and modern Hmong history, the Hmong oral tradition, the traditional clan and leadership structure, Hmong musical heritage, Hmong craft heritage, marriage and funeral practices, child-rearing customs, traditional methods of conflict resolution, the tradition of ancestor worship, and herbal and spiritual healing practices. Contemporary developments and adjustment issues within the Hmong communities will be discussed. These will include current Hmong business initiatives, educational achievements, utilization of welfare institutions, the role of Hmong Mutual Assistance Associations, intergenerational conflicts, youth gangs, traditional vs. modern family structure, and Hmong exposure to public prejudices and discriminatory practices. Throughout the course Hmong achievements and triumphs over adversity also will be highlighted. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing recommended. Cross-listed with ERS. Can only earn credit in ERS or SOC. 

SOC/ANT  300 Cr. 3
Latin America in Transition
The course uses a global studies approach to examine problems in human adaptation at distinct periods of time and place in Latin America. “Global studies” combines cultural ecology with political economy to investigate the impact of political movements, such as the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the Nicaraguan Revolution of 1979, and current neo-liberal political movements on the quality of life in Latin America. Prerequisite: ECO/GEO/HIS/POL/SOC/ANT 202. (Cross-listed with SOC; may only earn credit in ANT or SOC.)  

SOC   302   Cr. 3
Sociological Analysis
This course is intended to build upon SOC 200, Sociological Foundations, to enhance the conceptual, quantitative and communication skills of sociology students. Students will gain experience at using sociological concepts and theories to analyze selected social issues, be introduced to basic data collection and analysis techniques, gain a detailed familiarity with library resources most useful to sociological inquiry, and learn how to compose a sociological research report. To develop these sociological analysis skills, an emphasis will be placed on providing students with writing experiences in all aspects of the course.  Sociology majors should take this course as soon as possible after completing SOC 200. Prerequisite: SOC 200. 

SOC   305   Cr. 3
Sociology of Development 
and Social Change
This course examines three areas related to social change and development. First is a survey and evaluation of the theories explaining social change and social/economic development as they are applied to underdeveloped nations. Second is an examination of the social/economic problems confronted by underdeveloped countries and the solutions to those problems these countries have used. Third is an evaluation of international development programs. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200, or ANT 101. 

SOC   310   Cr. 3
Social Stratification
The nature, study, theories and types of social stratification systems are examined along with the forces contributing to their maintenance and disruption. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200, or ANT 101. 

SOC   311   Cr. 3
Rural and Urban Sociology
Basic sociological concepts and principles are applied to life in rural vs. urban communities. Focus will be on the political economy, the culture, and social problems of rural people in comparison to urban people. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101.  

SOC   313   Cr. 3
Law and Society
Analysis of the origins and functions of law in society. The focus of the course will be upon modern American society and the relationship of law to social change and its impact upon such concerns as civil rights, environmental protection, sex-role differentiation, treatment of handicapped and the mentally ill. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200, or ANT 101. 

SOC   315   Cr. 3
Religion and Society
Explores the social and cultural context in which religion functions; the effects of religion upon behavior and attitudes; the social organization of denominations, sects, cults and movements; the relationships between religion and other social institutions; religion and social inequality; social change and the future of religion. Special attention is given to world religions and ethical and public policy issues concerning religion, society, and the individual. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200, or ANT 101. 

SOC   317   Cr. 3
Sociology of Film
Examines the industrial and social structure of the film industry, the role of film entertainment in the culture of Western societies and the kinds of social situations portrayed on screen. The course will also examine the appeals of film from the point of view of aesthetics, film theory and popular culture. The focus of the course is upon film as a partial social system influenced by the values of society and influencing changes in the dominant culture. Exemplary films from Hollywood, from foreign countries and from independent documentary filmmakers will be shown throughout the course. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200, or ANT 101. 

SOC   320   Cr. 3
Demography
This course is designed as a basic survey of the field of demography. Sources of population data will be explored along with causes and consequences of population growth, composition and distribution. This course will focus on the concepts, measurements, trends and theories of the major demographic processes of fertility, mortality and migration. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200, or ANT 101. 

SOC   321   Cr. 3
Delinquency
Juvenile delinquency as a problem for society. Analysis of causes, prevention, and treatment. Public policy implications of the melioration of this social problem. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. 

SOC   322   Cr. 3
Criminology
An overview of the sociological study of crime with emphasis on the etiology of criminal behavior in terms of sociological theories. The classification of crime. Societal impact on our understanding of crime and criminals. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101.

SOC   324   Cr. 3
Criminal Justice
An overview of the United States Criminal Justice system. Issues relating to crime, the administration of justice, the police, courts, and correctional systems are explored. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. 

SOC   325   Cr. 3
Sociology of Mental Illness
An examination of mental health and illness, and mental health care systems in the U.S. and other industrialized and non-industrialized societies, including: the processes involved in identifying and recruiting patients into the mental health care system; a social analysis of psychotherapy, including talk therapies, medications, electro-convulsive treatment and psychosurgery; and social organization of mental hospitals and of community mental health centers; socio-legal issues related to mental illness; and a review and synthesis of social psychological and sociological theories relevant to understanding mental health and illness. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101 or PSY 100.  

SOC   326   Cr. 3
Society and Drugs
This course will analyze the nature, current use, historical and cultural patterns, approaches to treatment, and identification of use patterns of psychoactive drugs. As a sociology course, it will be critical of what we believe and what we uncritically accept as objective fact about drugs. The course is designed to provide knowledge of how societies define drugs and drug use as problems and come to view them as problems, to offer an approach to understanding the nature and patterns of drug use and abuse, to understand programs and policies attempting to control drugs and drug usage, to understand prevention approaches and what does and does not work, and to evaluate and better understand treatment approaches. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101.  

SOC   328   Cr. 3
Environmental Sociology
Environmental Sociology provides a framework for understanding the role of physical-biological factors in shaping social structures and behaviors as well as the impact of social organization and social change on the natural environment. This course will focus on the conflicts between the logic of economic growth and the realities of both the global environment and social justice within and between societies.  

SOC   330   Cr. 3
Social Psychology
Social psychology from a sociological perspective. Primary attention is given to social behavior and communication patterns in terms of their genesis and change in the context of social groups and social relationships. May be taken in lieu of PSY 341. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. 

SOC   334   Cr. 3
Sociology of Small Groups
An introduction to the understanding and interpreting of human behavior in small groups. The focus of the course will be to provide students with some analytical tools to understand the social dynamics of small groups as well as the techniques for improving the interpersonal effectiveness of the student in small group situations. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. May only earn credit in SOC 334 or CST 250 or PSY 343. 

SOC   335   Cr. 3
Collective Behavior
A systematic study of social processes which emerge in unstructured social situations; principles of behavior as expressed in crowds, mobs, panics, fads, fashions, social movements, personal organization and behavior in unstructured social situations. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101.  

SOC   338   Cr. 3
Sociological Aspects of Work and Life
This course will explore the sociological impact of work and life demands in contemporary American society. Special emphasis will be given to how gender, sexual orientation, social class, race and ethnicity, and family structure affect individuals’ ability to balance the demands of work and life. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. May only earn credit in SOC 338 or PSY 444. 

SOC 340     Cr. 3
Bioethics and Society
A sociological examination of medical/ethical decision-making that includes an analysis of psychosocial aspects of patient care and public policy in medical ethics. Approaches to medical ethics are reviewed in terms of a case-based
ethical problem-solving model that includes sociological and demographic factors. The course may be team-taught with colleagues in medical bioethics and will include the social sources of bioethics, social organization of bioethics in health care, and bioethical case studies. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101 or PHL 100. May only earn credit in SOC 340 or PHL 339.
 

SOC/ERS  343            Cr. 3
American Indian Contemporary Issues
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of American Indian contemporary experience in the United States. It will introduce students to some of the critical issues in American Indian studies by examining the place of American Indians within the American imagination, politics and society. The course concentrates on issues of tribal sovereignty, economics, social class and structure, and the difficulties of maintaining a tribal identity in the 21st century. Prerequisite: One of the following: ERS 100, ERS 253, SOC 225, EFN 205, HIS 310, W-S 230. (Cross-listed with ERS; may only earn credit in ERS or SOC.) 

SOC   350   Cr. 3
Methods of Sociological Research II
An overview of the issues and methods involved in the process of scientific investigation of social phenomena. The limitations of, and ethical issues involved in, social research are examined. Data collection methods, both quantitative and qualitative, including surveys, observation, and secondary data analysis are investigated. Students propose and complete a research project, applying material learned in Sociological Research Methods I. The laboratory portion of this course requires student application of various research techniques and computer-assisted data analysis. Lect. 2, Lab 2. Prerequisite: SOC 200, 250. 

SOC/ANT  354 Cr. 3
Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
An examination of the peoples and cultures of Latin America from prehistoric times to the present. This survey course will introduce the student to the prehistory of Mesoamerica and the Andes, colonial Latin America, and modern Latin America. Among the important issues discussed are the impact of the Spanish Conquest, the rise of the modern state, the development of the various cultures of Latin America, revolutionary movements, urbanization, gender, religion, and art and literature. Prerequisite: ANT/ECO/ GEO/POL/ SOC/HIS 202. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in SOC or ANT.) 

SOC/ANT  360 Cr. 3
Catastrophies and Human Societies
An analysis of cultural impact of catastrophic events in human societies - natural and human-engineered disasters. Various dramatic upheavals will be explored across time and cultures as the class examines human and environmental traumas to which societies must adapt, the cultural interpretations/response which follow, and the manner in which major disasters have redefined and redirected the character and probable future history of each damaged, even endangered society. Study cases will include volcanic and weather cataclysms, plagues and associated population crashes, environmental catastrophes, as well as war, terrorism, and bio-terrorism. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in SOC or ANT.) 

SOC/ERS  363            Cr. 3
American Indians and the Environment
This course introduces students to American Indian environmental issues. Topics include treaty-based hunting, fishing and gathering rights, air and water quality regulatory authority, environmental racism, toxic and nuclear waste disposal on Indian lands, mining and hydroelectric dams, sacred sites, and Indian vs. Western perceptions of the environment. Special attention will be given to current environmental controversies in Wisconsin Indian country. Prerequisite: One of the following: ERS 100, 253, ERS/SOC 343, SOC 225, 328, EFN 205. (Cross-listed with ERS; may only earn credit in ERS or SOC.) 

SOC   370   Cr. 3
Sociology of Gender
Explores the social construction, variation and consequences of gender categories across time and space. Examines how gender identities are developed and how gender structures our experiences in education, work, families, the media and other institutions. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. 

SOC   390   Cr. 3
Early Sociological Theory
Critical survey of scholars who contributed to the rise of scientific sociology, focusing on the historical circumstances, the personalities and the ideas of the prominent early sociologists prior to the mid-twentieth century. Particular attention is given to August Comte, Herbert Spencer, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, George Herbert Mead, and C. Wright Mills. Prerequisite: SOC 200.  

SOC   395   Cr. 3
Contemporary Sociological Theory
Modern sociological theories at the macro- and micro-levels are summarized, compared and applied. Macro-level theories include social evolution, general systems, functionalist, and social conflict theories. Micro-level theories include interaction, self, role, phenomenological, exchange, rational choice, and interaction ritual theories. The linkage of micro- and macro-level theory in sociology is addressed in network and organizational theories. Selected concepts and perspectives are applied in sociological practice projects. Prerequisite: SOC 200. Offered Sem 1. 

SOC/ANT/ARC   399      Cr. 1-3
Sociological Forum
Investigation of areas and topics of current social interest not covered in the regular curriculum ranging from local to transnational issues. (Cross-listed with ANT and ARC; may only earn 12 credits total in SOC, ANT and ARC.) Repeatable for credit maximum 12.  

SOC   405   Cr. 3
Quantitative Social Research Seminar
This course guides students through the completion of an independent quantitative sociological research project. Students conduct research on a topic related to their own interest within the field of sociology using standard quantitative methods such as survey research, evaluation research, or secondary data analysis. Each student formulates a sociologically relevant research hypothesis, designs the appropriate research methodology, reviews relevant theoretical and empirical literature, and gathers and analyzes data in a step-by-step process. The results of the research process are presented in a formal research paper. Prerequisite: SOC 350, 390 or 395.  

SOC   409 Cr. 2-3
Readings and Research in Sociology
Directed readings or research under the supervision of an instructor. Prerequisite: consent of supervising instructor and junior standing. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6. 

SOC   410   Cr. 3
Sociology Honors Project
The development and completion of an honors research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Open only to students who have been accepted into the Sociology Honors Program. Registration by consent of instructor. 

SOC   416   Cr. 3
Qualitative Explorations
This course is designed to familiarize students with the major techniques of qualitative data collection and analysis used by sociologists and other social scientists. These include feminist methods, participant observation, in-depth interviewing, biographical methods, content analysis, archival research, and a variety of nonreactive techniques. This course will also address the links among theory, data, and methods and provide an appreciation for the qualitative tradition in social sciences. Students will learn how to conduct field research. The course will follow a seminar format emphasizing reading, group discussion, in- and out- of class exercises, oral presentations, original research and writing. Prerequisite: SOC 350; SOC 390 or 395. Offered Sem. I. 

SOC   420   Cr. 3
Health Care and Illness
A survey of the social organization of medical professions, socialization of personnel, sick role dynamics, social construction of illness, lay referral networks, political factors in health care delivery, and problems of various age groups and families in coping with illness in several societies. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. 

SOC   422   Cr. 3
Death, Grief and Bereavement
A study of the interaction of individuals and families coping with dying and death in various social settings including hospitals, nursing homes, hospices. Topics include psychosocial aspects of grief and mourning, sociological dimensions of bereavement, and various rituals of funeralization in the U.S. and other societies. Special attention is given to case studies and medical/ethical decision-making at the end of life, as well as other aspects of the social organization of death, dying and bereavement. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. 

SOC   429   Cr. 3
Sociology of Deviance
Personal, social and cultural systems that generate atypical forms of social action/reaction can be subsumed under sociology of deviance. This course should offer the student further study of the “problems” courses — delinquency, criminology, population, corrections, etc. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101 and one other sociology course. 

SOC   450   Cr. 3-15
Internship in Sociology
An academically relevant field experience for majors and minors in sociology/anthropology. The field experience will be supervised by the sociology/anthropology staff. Prerequisite: SOC 200, junior standing with an overall GPA of at least 2.50. No more than six credits may be applied to a major in sociology and no more than three credits toward sociology minor or anthropology minor. Repeatable for credit — maximum 15. Pass/Fail grading. 

SOC   451   Cr. 3
Internship in Criminal Justice
An academically relevant field experience for minors in criminal justice. Prerequisite: SOC 324 and junior standing. Open only to criminal justice minors. Pass/Fail grading. 

SOC   475/575 Cr. 1-3
Workshop in Applied Sociology
Intensive short-term study of a problem area in terms of applied sociology framework. The workshops would focus on integration of the latest social science findings and their application to problem solving in various institutional and community settings. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6.  

SOC   480   Cr. 3
Comparative Sociology
Cross-cultural and cross-national study of basic institutions, including family, education, and political economy. Macro-sociological theories and comparative methodology are discussed. The main course objective is that students develop an understanding of the consequences of living in a global society. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or ANT 101. 

SOC   499   Cr. 3
Seminar in Sociology
Intensive study of some specific area or problem of sociology. Prerequisite: SOC 350 or 390 or 395. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6.

  

Anthropology (ANT) 

+ above a course number indicates a
General Education course. 

+
ANT    101   Cr. 3
Human Nature/Human Culture
This course is designed to focus student participation on discovering and understanding what it means to be human. The interdependency of human biology and culture are deciphered through a modern anthropological perspective. 

+
ANT    102   Cr. 4
Introduction to Physical Anthropology
This course introduces the basic fields of physical anthropology: population genetics, human osteology, primatology, pale anthropology, and forensics. The class provides a substantive framework for learning about the biological diversity of the human species through scientific inquiry. The foundations of evolutionary theory and the fossil evidence for human evolution are also presented. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. 

+
ANT    202   Cr. 3
Contemporary Global Issues
This course will offer a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the global society in the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern global society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science, and history. (Cross-listed with ECO/GEO/POL/SOC/HIS 202; may only earn credit in one department.)  

ANT    203   Cr. 3
Culture and Ecology
This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology using the paradigm of cultural ecological theory. Cultural ecological theory is used to study the interaction between humans and their environments including hunting and gathering bands, agricultural tribes, irrigation-dependent chiefdoms, and archaic and modern states. The course examines the impact of globalization on the social systems mentioned above. Much of the course is used to examine contemporary global issues.  

ANT    250  Cr. 3 
Women and Society
A comparative and evolutionary analysis of the development of sex roles in human society, concentrating on the experience of females. Considers sexual dimorphism; symbolic background of gender; relationships between techno-economy, social structure, political organization and women’s roles; personality and sex roles; and the experience of women in America. 

ANT/ARC   285     Cr. 3
Archaeology of Mexico and Central America
This course offers the student an overview of the evolution of the civilizations of ancient Mesoamerica (Mexico and Central America) from the earliest stages of hunting and food gathering until the conquest of Mesoamerica by Spain in the early 16th century. The course describes the social and economic life as organized by a complex religion which produced human sacrifice, writing, calendrical systems, advanced art forms, iconography, and monument building activities. (Cross-listed with ARC; may only earn credit in ANT or ARC.)  

ANT/SOC  300 Cr. 3
Latin America in Transition
The course uses a global studies approach to examine problems in human adaptation at distinct periods of time and place in Latin America. “Global studies” combines cultural ecology with political movements, such as the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the Nicaraguan Revolution of 1979, and current neo-liberal political movements on the quality of life in Latin America. Prerequisite: ANT/SOC 202 or POL 202 or GEO 202 or HIS202, ECO 202. (Cross-listed with SOC; may only earn credit in ANT or SOC.) 

ANT/ARC  304 Cr. 3
Hunter and Gatherer Societies
This course focuses on recent human societies throughout the world that have lived by hunting and gathering wild resources. The specific subsistence strategies of a wide range of hunter-gatherer groups are examined relative to their technology, social structure, territory, demography and interaction with food producers. The conclusion of this course will consider hunter-gatherers in prehistory. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing; ARC 200 recommended. (Cross-listed with ARC; may only earn credit in ANT or ARC.) 

ANT/ARC  305 Cr. 3
Indigenous Agricultural Societies: Past and Present
This course examines the origins, structure, social organization, and operation of indigenous agricultural societies. A central focus of the course is an inquiry based, sequential examination of geographically related couplets involving (1) contemporary indigenous agricultural tribal societies and (2) archaeological excavation reports. The utility of the ethnographic record as a guide to interpretation of the archaeological record is evaluated. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. (Cross-listed with ARC; may only earn credit in ANT or ARC.) 

ANT/ARC  315 Cr. 3
Prairie-Plains Archaeology
This survey of the Prairie-Plains examines cultural ecological adaptations, sociopolitical changes and continuities among Prairie and Plains Indians through time. Perspective from archeology, ethnology, history and contemporary literary sources are used to characterize human adaptation to the Prairie-Plains area and the impacts of Euro-American society on native peoples. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in ARC or ANT.) 

ANT/ARC  334 Cr. 3
Bones for the Archaeologist: Human Skeletal Anatomy and the Anthropological Study of the Dead
This course is designed for students majoring in archaeological studies or related fields. The focus of this course is a detailed study of the human skeleton. Each student will be required to learn the anatomy of the human skeleton in detail. Also considered are methods of determining an individual’s age, ethnic origins, sex, and stature from skeletal remains. The final three weeks of the course will be concerned with anthropological interpretation of the dead. (Cross-listed with ARC; may only earn credit in ANT or ARC.) 

ANT    342   Cr. 3
The Celtic World
Examines origins and dynamic development of Celtic tribes dominating pre-Roman Britain and Europe through the study of physical and social organization, ecological adaptations, religion, art and literature, music, gender, and resistance to Roman occupation. Traces Celtic themes through early Christian and medieval periods to the modern world. Explores Celtic survivals, revivals, and nationalism today, and considers Celtic contributions to U.S. history and culture. 

ANT    343   Cr. 3
North American Indians
This course concentrates on the Native peoples of North America (north of Mexico) immediately following the arrival of Europeans. The cultural patterns of representative groups will be studied intensively in each major region of North America. The region-by-region survey will be preceded by a brief discussion of the place of origin and time of arrival of the first people in the New World. This course will not be considering contemporary Native American issues. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. 

ANT    350   Cr. 3
Language and Culture
An investigation into the nature and origins of language, its relationship to other forms of communication, its role in the evolution of our species, and its place in the operation of cultural systems. 

ANT    352   Cr. 3
The Anthropology of War
The Anthropology of War examines bio-cultural processes in human evolutionary history and forces in the cultural present contributing to and associated with the emergence and recurrence of war and institutional violence. 

ANT/ARC/HIS   353     Cr. 3
Maya Civilization
The course presents an overview of the Maya culture located in southern Mexico and Central America. The class is organized chronologically into several sections that focus on the origins, adaptations to various environments, social, political, and religious organizations, and the belief systems of the Maya beginning at around 3000 B.C. Emphasis will be on Prehispanic Maya; will also explore life ways of contemporary Maya people. (Cross-listed with ARC and HIS; may only earn credit in ANT or ARC or HIS.) 

ANT/SOC  354 Cr. 3
Peoples and Cultures of Latin America
An examination of the peoples and cultures of Latin America from prehistoric times to the present. This survey course will introduce the student to the prehistory of Mesoamerica and the Andes, colonial Latin America, and modern Latin America. Among the important issues discussed are the impact of the Spanish Conquest, the rise of the modern state, the development of the various cultures of Latin America, revolutionary movements, urbanization, gender, religion, and art and literature. Prerequisite: ANT/ECO/GEO/POL/SOC/HIS 202. (Cross-listed with SOC; may only earn credit in ANT or SOC.) 

ANT    355   Cr. 3
Peoples of Africa and the Middle East
Examines the prehistoric antecedents, the histories, and the characteristics of the peoples and cultures of Africa and the Middle East. The course begins with the earliest systems of adaptation of which we have knowledge, and goes on to examine the origins of agriculture, the development of early states, the migrations of people, the cultures of both regions, the impact of colonialism, and the emerging problems of Africa and the Middle East. Prerequisite: ANT 101 or 202 or SOC 110. 

ANT/SOC  360 Cr. 3
Catastrophies and Human Societies
An analysis of cultural impact of catastrophic events in human societies - natural and human-engineered disasters. Various dramatic upheavals will be explored across time and cultures as the class examines human and environmental traumas to which societies must adapt, the cultural interpretations/responses which follow, and the manner in which major disasters have redefined and redirected the character and probable future history of each damaged, even endangered society. Study cases will include volcanic and weather cataclysms, plagues and associated population crashes, environmental catastrophes, as well as war, terrorism, and bio-terrorism. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 120 or 200 or ANT 101. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in SOC or ANT.) 

ANT/SOC/ARC  399     Cr. 1-3
Anthropological Forum
Investigation of areas and topics of current anthropological interest not covered in the regular curriculum, ranging from local and regional to transcultural issues. Repeatable for credit — maximum 12. (Cross-listed with SOC and ARC; may only earn 12 credits total in ANT, SOC, and ARC.) Departmental option for Pass/Fail grading. 

ANT    409 Cr. 1-3
Readings and Research in Anthropology
Directed readings or research under the supervision of an instructor. Prerequisite: consent of supervising instructor and junior standing. Repeatable for credit — maximum 6. 

ANT    444   Cr. 3
Comparative Religion and Magic
Religion and magic in human cultural system: origins, adaptations, and change. Analysis of primitive, traditional, modern, and western societies. 

ANT    450   Cr. 3-15
Internship in Anthropology

An academically relevant field experience for majors and minors in sociology/anthropology. The field experience will be supervised by the sociology/anthropology staff. Prerequisite: junior standing with at least a 2.50 G.P.A. and approval of the departmental internship committee. No more than six credits may be applied to a major in sociology and no more than three credits toward sociology minor or anthropology minor. Repeatable for credit — maximum 15. Pass/Fail grading. Offered occasionally. 

ANT/ARC  454 Cr. 3
Historical and Theoretical Approaches in Anthropology
This course is an examination of historical and theoretical approaches in Anthropology. The goal of the course is to prepare majors for graduate study by examining the history of the discipline and exploring the methods and theories developed by anthropologists to study and explain human behavior. Prerequisite: ARC 200, junior or senior standing. 

ANT/ARC  479 Cr. 1-2
Archaeology/Anthropology Laboratory Assistant
An opportunity to assist in the preparation and instruction of an archaeology/anthropology laboratory. Students will be expected to assist in preparation of course materials, demonstrate proper techniques, and evaluate student performance. Admission by instructor consent. Repeatable for credit — maximum 4. Not applicable to the archaeology major or anthropology minor. Pass/Fail grading.  

ANT    499 Cr. 2-3
Seminar in Anthropology
Intensive study of some specific area or problem of anthropology. Admission by consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit — maximum 12 between ARC 498 and ANT 499. Offered occasionally.

 

 

Archaeological Studies (ARC) 

+ above a course number indicates a
General Education course. 

+
ARC   100   Cr. 3
Archaeology: Discovering Our Past
This course is an introduction to the fascinating world of archaeology designed as a detailed exploration of the methods used to learn about past human life ways before written records. Each student will be involved in the process of discovering our past. 

ARC 195      Cr. 3
Archaeology
 This course is the introductory course for archaeology majors and a requirement to major in Archaeology. Methods and techniques for the recovery and interpretation of archaeological evidence are examined as well as the role of archaeology in modeling past human behavior and environments. Breakout sessions include exposure to and interpretation of archeological remains, field and lab methods, use of classification systems, and examination of prehistoric technologies such as stone tools and pottery.  Offered Sem I. 

ARC   200   Cr. 3
World Archaeology — The Story of Our Past
A survey course which examines the origin and development of human cultures from earliest Paleolithic times to the great ancient civilizations. An emphasis will be placed on how these evolutionary developments represent changing patterns of human adaptation to the social and natural environment. 

ARC/HIS  204 Cr. 3
Ancient Literate Civilizations
An historical and archaeological study of ancient Eurasia and North Africa, including a survey of the major archaeological sites. Topics such as the development of urbanization in the Near East and Mediterranean, and comparative studies of the Indus civilization, China, Classical Greece, Rome, and the New World will be discussed. (Cross-listed with HIS; may only earn credit in ARC or HIS.)  

ARC   205   Cr. 3
North American Archaeology
An intensive survey of the prehistoric cultures of North America from the time of the initial peopling of the New World to the period of European contact. Major archaeological sites will be critically examined and an interdisciplinary approach will be stressed. There will be field trips to archaeological sites and/or museums. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. 

ARC   250   Cr. 3
Museum Studies
This introductory course provides a history of museums, their goals and methods, administration, curation and exhibit techniques. Participants will be taking field trips to museums. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. 

ARC/HIS  275                   Cr. 3
Ancient Britain and Ireland
Exploration of the fascinating archaeological heritage of the British Isles and Ireland from the earliest Stone Age inhabitants to the end of the Roman Occupation. Prerequisite: ARC 200 and/or ARC/HIS 204 recommended. (Cross-listed with HIS; may only earn credit in ARC or HIS.) 

ARC   280   Cr. 3
Archaeology of the Andes
This course reviews the prehistory and early historic periods of the Andean regions of South America. Emphasis will be placed on tracing the rise of civilization in the Andes which culminated in the Inca Empire and the extraordinary events that led to the conquest of the Inca by the Spanish conquistadors. Topics to be explored include the controversial evidence of early man in South America, the role of the ocean and mountains in shaping pre-hispanic life, the origin of domesticated plants and animals, and the rise of the complex societies of Moche, Tiwanaku, Wari, Chimu, and of course, the Inca.  

ARC/ANT   285            Cr. 3
Archaeology of Mexico and Central America
This course offers the student an overview of the evolution of the civilizations of ancient Mesoamerica (Mexico and Central America) from the earliest stages of hunting and food gathering until the conquest of Mesoamerica by Spain in the early 16th century. The course describes the social and economic life as organized by a complex religion which produced human sacrifice, writing, calendrical systems, advanced art forms, iconography, and monument building activities. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in ARC or ANT.) 

ARC   300   Cr. 3
Cultural Resource Management
Since the 1980’s American archaeology has shifted from a strictly academic profession to a more practical occupation in which consulting and the implementation of legislation and public policy are major components. In fact, today Cultural Resource Management (CRM) is the dominant force in archaeology in the United States. The primary goals of this class are to provide students with an appreciation of the importance of CRM and an understanding of the legislation that drives it, as well as exposure to the everyday practices of archaeologists working in a CRM context. Prerequisite:   ARC 195. recommended  

ARC/ANT  304 Cr. 3
Hunter and Gatherer Societies
This course focuses on recent human societies throughout the world that have lived by hunting and gathering wild resources. The specific subsistence strategies of a wide range of hunter-gatherer groups are examined relative to their technology, social structure, territory, demography and interaction with food producers. The conclusion of this course will consider hunter-gatherers in prehistory. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing; ARC 200 recommended. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in ARC or ANT.) 

ARC/ANT  305 Cr. 3
Indigenous Agricultural Societies: Past and Present
This course examines the origins, structure, social organization, and operation of indigenous agricultural societies. A central focus of the course is an inquiry based, sequential examination of geographically related couplets involving (1) contemporary indigenous agricultural tribal societies and (2) archaeological excavation reports. The utility of the ethnographic record as a guide to interpretation of the archaeological record is evaluated. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in ARC or ANT.) 

ARC   310   Cr. 3
Midwest Archaeology
This course will focus on the human occupation in the Midwest/Great Lakes region over the past 12,000 years. Emphasis will be given to the dynamic quality of cultural adaptation and social organization. The cultural developments leading to the Middle Woodland and Mississippi climaxes in the region are to be stressed. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. 

ARC/ANT  315 Cr. 3
Prairie-Plains Archaeology
This survey of the Prairie-Plains examines cultural ecological adaptations, sociopolitical changes and continuities among Prairie and Plains Indians through time. Perspective from archeology, ethnology, history and contemporary literary sources are used to characterize human adaptation to the Prairie-Plains area and the impacts of Euro-American society on native peoples. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in ARC or ANT.) 

ARC   320   Cr. 3
Historical Archaeology
The focus of this course is historical archaeology. This discipline combines an archaeological evaluation of material remains from the historic past with an examination and analysis of historical sources. In the New World, historical archaeologists work on a broad range of sites that document early European settlement and its effects on Native American peoples, wars fought on American soil, the subsequent spread of the Euro-American frontier, and later periods of urbanization and industrialization. Historical archaeologists seek to understand the past from an anthropological perspective and appreciate how broad historical developments have shaped modern society. In this class we will explore all these aspects of historical archaeology in the New World and abroad. Prerequisite: ARC 200 recommended. 

ARC/HIS  331 Cr. 3
The Ancient Greek World
An historical and archaeological survey of the ancient Greek world (Greece proper, the Aegean Islands, southern Italy, western Turkey). Periods discussed will include Cretan (Minoan), Mycenaean, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, and Early Greek Christian. (Cross-listed with HIS; may only earn credit in ARC or HIS.) Offered every fourth semester. 

ARC/HIS  332 Cr. 3
Ancient Rome and the Mediterranean
An historical and archaeological survey of the ancient Mediterranean area (with emphasis on the Italian peninsula) from the founding of the city of Rome to the collapse of the western Roman Empire in the 5th century A.C.E. Periods discussed will include: Italy in the Neolithic period, the founding of Rome, Etruscan Domination, the Roman Republic, the Roman Principate/ Empire, and the advent of Roman Christianity. (Cross-listed with HIS; may only earn credit in ARC or HIS.) Offered every fourth semester. 

ARC/ANT  334 Cr. 3
Bones for the Archaeologist: 
Human Skeletal Anatomy and the Anthropological Study of the Dead
This course is designed for students majoring in Archaeological Studies or related fields. The focus of this course is a detailed study of the human skeleton. Each student will be required to learn the anatomy of the human skeleton in detail. Also considered are methods of determining an individual’s age, ethnic origins, sex, and stature from skeletal remains. The final three weeks of the course will be concerned with anthropological interpretation of the dead. (Cross-listed with ANT; may only earn credit in ARC or ANT.)

ARC/HIS  340 Cr. 3
The Rise and Fall of Ancient Civilizations
A historical and archaeological study of the nature of the origin of ancient civilizations and causes for their decline and fall. Numerous case studies will be surveyed, including the rise and fall of Sumerian, Egyptian, Iranian, Hittite, Harappan, Israelite, Chinese, Minoan, Classical Greek and Roman, and New World civilizations, among others. (Cross-listed with HIS; may only earn credit in ARC or HIS.)  

ARC   350 Cr. 1-6 
Independent Foreign Research in Archaeology
An individually designed, directed archaeological research project in a foreign country dealing with a significant field, laboratory, museum, or archival/library research problem. The course permits in-depth, independent research using foreign sources, facilities, and resource persons. Requires a high degree of motivation and the ability to work independently. Prerequisite: INS 250, junior or senior standing, and consent of the department of sociology/archaeology. Only three credits may apply to the major.  

ARC/ANT/HIS  353     Cr. 3
Maya Civilization
The course presents an overview of the Maya culture located in southern Mexico and Central America. The class is organized chronologically into several sections that focus on the origins, adaptations to various environments, social, political, and religious organizations, and the belief systems of the Maya beginning at around 3000 B.C. Emphasis will be on Prehispanic Maya; will also explore life ways of contemporary Maya people. (Cross-listed with ANT and HIS; may only earn credit in ARC, ANT, or HIS.) 

ARC/HIS  365 Cr. 3
Ancient Iraq
A historical and archaeological survey of ancient Iraq (Syro-Mesopotamia) from its prehistoric origin in the neolithic period to the Seleucid period. Ethnic groups discussed will include the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Kassites, Amorites, Chaldeans, and Elamites. Topics will include the rise of urbanism, cuneiform writing, religion, literature, displaced persons, gender relations, and social structure. (Cross-listed with HIS; may only earn credit in ARC or HIS.)  

ARC/HIS  366 Cr. 3
Ancient Israel
A historical and archaeological survey of coastal Syria and Palestine from the neolithic period to the Roman conquest. Various ethnic groups discussed will include the Eblaites, Phoenicians, Philistines, Canaanites, Arameans, Israelites, Samaritans, and Judeans. Special emphasis will be placed on putting biblical history in its Palestinian context. Topics will include social structure, gender relations, religion, and literature. (Cross-listed with HIS; may only earn credit in ARC or HIS.) 

ARC/HIS 367  Cr. 3
Ancient Egypt
This course is a survey of the history, archaeology, culture, and civilizations of ancient Egypt from the prehistoric periods, the Pharaonic periods, as well as the Greaco-Roman periods (to the advent of Christianity). Special attention will be given to reading historical texts in translation. We will also explore various aspects of Egyption religion, and the treatment of woman and non-Egyption ethnic groups. (Cross-listed with ARC; may only earn credit in HIS or ARC.) 

ARC/HIS  372 Cr. 3
History of Women in the Ancient World
A history of the nature and status of women in the ancient world as derived from textual sources, including works of literature, private letters, economic documents, and tomb inscriptions. Areas studied will be Syro-Mesopotamia, Israel, Iran, Anatolia, Egypt, and the Mediterranean world. Also discussed will be the study of women as derived from archaeological sources. (Cross-listed with HIS; may only earn credit in ARC or HIS.) Offered once every three semesters. 

ARC   395   Cr. 1
Graduate Preparation Seminar
Third year students who are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in anthropology or archaeology have many things to consider. This seminar is designed to help students determine what research they intend to pursue after graduation, what graduate schools are particularly well suited to meet their research needs, how to target and apply to certain programs, and how to develop an impressive resume. This seminar will also serve to prepare students who do not intend to continue their education in graduate school for employment opportunities upon graduation. Other restrictions: archaeology majors of at least junior standing. Pass/Fail grading. 

ARC/SOC/ANT  399           Cr. 1-3
Archaeological Forum
Investigation of areas and topics of current archaeological interest not covered in the regular curriculum ranging from local and regional to transcultural issues. Repeatable for credit—maximum 12. (Cross-listed with SOC and ARC; may only earn 12 credits total in ARC, SOC, and ANT.) Departmental option for Pass/ Fail grading. 

ARC   402 Cr. 3-8
Field Methods in Archaeology
Practical application of the basic skills used in the excavation of archaeological sites, including surveying techniques, methods of excavation, compilation of field data, and laboratory analysis. Enrollment by permission of instructor. ARC 195 recommended.  Offered summer session. 

ARC   403   Cr. 3
Archaeology Lab Methods
Taking a hands-on approach to analyzing and interpreting archaeological remains, the class will integrate lectures with demonstrations, experiments, and supervised laboratory projects. Study will focus on the potential for interpreting human life ways and adaptations to the environment from stone tools, ceramics, floral, and faunal remains. Prerequisite: ARC 200; recommended ARC 205, 310 or 402. Offered even-numbered years. 

ARC   404   Cr. 3
Environmental Archaeology
This course investigates the relationship between prehistoric human societies and their biotic communities. An array of techniques using plant and animal remains from archaeological contexts to reconstruct aspects of ancient environments, climates, and human subsistence patterns are examined. Applications of environmental data toward the understanding of human settlement and subsistence systems are discussed. Prerequisite: ARC 200, junior or senior standing.  

ARC   409/509 Cr. 1-3
Readings and Research in Archaeology
Directed readings or research under the super-vision of an instructor. Prerequisite: ARC 200 or 490/590 or ARC 493/593, consent of supervising instructor, junior standing. Repeatable for credit — maximum 12.  

ARC   445   Cr. 3
Research Methods in Archaeology
This course is an introduction to a broad spectrum of research strategies available to archaeologists with a focus on quantitative methods. It is not a course in statistics. Rather, the course is intended to help students learn to be comfortable working with qualitative and quantitative data, and to be a sampler of commonly used quantitative methods in archaeology. Prerequisite: MTH 145 or 250 is recommended. 

ARC   450   Cr. 1-15
Internship in Archaeology
An academically relevant field experience for archaeology students. The experience will involve direct participation in excavation, laboratory analysis, or other aspects of archaeological science including museum work, supervised by an archaeologist or professional of a related discipline. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing with a GPA of at least 3.00 and approval of the department. Repeatable for credit — maximum 15. Only three credits can apply to the major. Pass/Fail grading.     

ARC/ANT  454 Cr. 3
Historical and Theoretical Approaches in Anthropology
This course is an examination of historical and theoretical approaches in Anthropology. The goal of the course is to prepare majors for graduate study by examining the history of the discipline and exploring the methods and theories developed by anthropologists to study and explain human behavior. Prerequisite: ARC 200, junior or senior standing. 

ARC   455   Cr. 3
Historical and Theoretical Perspectives in Archaeology 
This course reviews the practice of archaeology from its antiquarian beginnings through modern times. The goal of the course is to explore, from a historical perspective, the theoretical approaches that have been used by archaeologists to explain past human behavior. By exploring the development of archaeological thought through time, students will gain a deeper understanding of current theoretical approaches in archaeology. Prerequisite: ARC 195 and junior or senior standing. 

ARC/ANT  479 Cr. 1-2
Archaeology/Anthropology Laboratory Assistant
An opportunity to assist in the preparation and instruction of an archaeology/anthropology laboratory. Students will be expected to assist in preparation of course materials, demonstrate proper techniques, and evaluate student performance. Admission by instructor consent. Repeatable for credit — maximum 4. Not applicable to the archaeology major or anthropology minor. Pass/Fail grading.  

ARC   490/590 Cr. 3
Archaeology for Teachers
This course explores methods and resources for applying archaeology in the regular precollegiate classroom. A brief overview of the science of archaeology, and the pre-European cultures of Wisconsin and Minnesota is provided. Offered occasionally. 

ARC   491/591 Cr. 3
Archaeology Field School for Teachers
Participants will experience the basic skills used in the excavation of archaeological sites, including surveying techniques, methods of excavation, compilation, of field data and laboratory analysis. Practical application of the skills will be related to the classroom of the precollegiate instructor. Prerequisite: ARC 490/590 or ARC 493/593. Repeatable for credit — maximum 12. Offered occasionally. 

ARC   492/592 Cr. 3
Archaeology Analysis Procedures for Teachers
Taking a hands-on approach to analyzing and interpreting archaeological remains, the class will integrate lectures with demonstrations, experiments, and supervised laboratory projects. Study will focus on the potential for interpreting human life ways and adaptations to the environment from stone tools, ceramics, floral, and faunal remains. Practical application of the interpretation process will be related to the classroom of the precollegiate instructor. Introduction will provide an overview of field procedures. Prerequisite: ARC 490/590 or ARC 493/593. Offered occasionally. 

ARC 493/593 Cr. 3
Wisconsin Archaeology for Teachers
This class is designed to provide teachers with substantial content on the science of archaeology and the pre-European history of Wisconsin. Through an inquiry-based approach, teachers learn the process of archaeological interpretation of cultural patterns from material remains by undertaking the reconstruction of such patterns from a provided sample of material remains. This process is applicable to the K-12 classroom. Offered occasionally. 

ARC 494/594 Cr. 1-3
Applied Archaeology for Teachers
This class is designed to give teachers a comprehensive and hands-on personal experience in archaeological data acquisition, interpretation and experimental archaeology. Participants will apply class content to the K-12 classroom. Repeatable for credit— maximum 12.  Offered occasionally. 

ARC   498/598 Cr. 1-3
Seminar in Archaeology

Intensive study of some specific area or problem of archaeology. Prerequisite: ARC 200 or 490/590 or ARC 493/593. Repeatable for credit — maximum 12 credits between ARC 498 and ANT 499. Department option for Pass/Fail grading.
 

ARC   499   Cr. 3
Senior Project/Thesis in Archaeology
This course is the last course in the Archaeological Studies major course sequence and is normally taken during the student’s final year. The course is designed to assist the student in completing the graduation requirement of the senior project/thesis. Prerequisite: senior standing and prior agreement with project adviser. Offered Sem. II.

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