Exercise and Sport Science (ESS)

College of Science and Health
Department Chair: Patrick DiRocco
137 Mitchell Hall,
(608)785-8173
email: dirocco.patr@uwlax.edu

www.uwlax.edu/sah/ess

Professors: Batesky, Foster, Mikat, Porcari, Steffen, Tymeson;
Associate Professors:
DiRocco, Martinez, Udermann, Waters, Yu;
Assistant Professors: Adegbamigbe, Battista, Felix, Gibson, M., Mally, Pein, SkempArlt, Wright;
Lecturers:
Blum, Burton, Dobertstein, Dodge, Durnin, Erickson B., Erickson T., Gibson B., Gillette, Healy, Heeren, Helixon, Kline, Malecek, Mickschl, Olson, Perkins, Petersen.

CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The Center of Excellence designation was awarded to the Department of Exercise and Sport Science by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. The purpose of the center, which reflects the excellent reputation of the department, is to serve as a catalyst for maintaining faculty and curricular vitality while expanding the scope of comprehensive services provided to professionals in Wisconsin and throughout the nation. General goals are to provide in service and expertise in emerging content areas and technology to physical educators and students in professional preparation programs; modify undergraduate and master's curricula to incorporate recent trends and projected professional needs and expand research and public service components with special emphasis on assessment.

A three dimensional professional preparation model was developed with the following foci: (1) enhancing life span motor development; (2) promoting the major purposes of professional preparation in physical education - prevention of injury or illness, skill enhancement, meaningful active living, and rehabilitation; and (3) developing instruments for assessment of performance and programs. Additional emphasis is placed on the importance of movement of young children and on age related changes in active, older adults to develop and maintain efficient movement throughout the lifespan. The professional preparation programs within the Department of Exercise and Sport Science prepare graduates to assist individuals of all ages in developing meaningful, active lifestyles. Improving the level of skill in a wide variety of activities and promoting effective movement patterns will result in more active and healthy individuals in our society. For additional information regarding the Center of Excellence in Physical Education, please contact: Department Chair, Exercise and Sport Science, Mitchell Hall, University of Wisconsin La Crosse, La Crosse, WI 54601.

Exercise Science, Health and Recreation Transfer Policy -

Students transferring into the exercise, science, health, and recreation programs must have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher at the time of transfer.

Premajor and Admission to Program

All students in the department of exercise and sport science will be designated as premajor until they have been admitted to their specific program. This applies to the following majors: preathletic training, preESSfitness, preESSsport management, and preESSphysical education teaching.

Students are advised to become aware of the application criteria for their major, and may refer to program Web sites for the most detailed information regarding these criteria and procedures. Meeting minimum criteria does not guarantee admission, as the department programs have competitive admission processes.

Athletic Training Major

(College of Science and Health) - 72 credits - ESS 181, 201, 205, 206, 207, 283, 286, 287, 302, 303, 323, 349, 368, 378, 379, 386, 387, 450, 481, 483, 484, 485, 486. Interdisciplinary Requirements: HPR 105*, HP 401.Athletic training majors are required to take BIO 105* to meet prerequisite for advanced courses.

Note:

Admission to the athletic training program is competitive and not all who apply can be accommodated. Admission requires an application/ selection process for entry into ESS 181. Enrollment in ESS 181 is limited to 35 candidates who will be considered for final selection into the program following completion of ESS 181 and a subsequent semester of volunteer athletic training center experience. Ten to fourteen (10-14) of the 35 candidates are selected at the end of the two-semester experience to enter the CAAEP accredited undergraduate program. Application deadline for enrollment in ESS 181 is February 1 for consideration for each fall semester. Application materials may be obtained from the program Web site. Notification of acceptance into ESS 181 will be made by approximately April 1.

Students accepted to the athletic training educational program after the observational year may not participate in intercollegiate athletics secondary to scheduling conflicts with clinical and field experiences required in the educational program.

* These courses may apply to the General Education requirements. May substitute BIO 103 for BIO 105.

Consideration for selection into ESS 181 is based on the following criteria:

  1. Acceptance into the University of Wisconsin La Crosse;
  2. Cumulative high school/university GPA;
  3. GPA in science and sports medicine related course work;
  4. SAT or ACT scores and rank in class;
  5. Strength of student's athletic training commitment as reflected in letters of recommendation;
  6. Previous athletic training/sports medicine experience, extracurricular activities and leadership experience.
  7. Evaluation of application by selection committee.

Students admitted into the athletic training education program must maintain a minimum 2.75 cumulative grade point average (GPA), a minimum of a 3.0 GPA in all course work in the major, and have clinical evaluation scores of 3.0 or above (5.0 scale). Failure to meet any one of these retention criteria requires the student to be on a probationary status. If the student does not meet all criteria in two consecutive semesters, the student will be removed from the program.

Exercise and Sport Science Major - Physical Education

(Teacher Certification programs) 60 credits of professional requirements. (freshman year) ESS 112, 117, 121; (sophomore year) ESS 205, 206, 207, 225, 231, 258, 261; (junior year) ESS 302, 303, 310, 322, 325, 367; (senior year) ESS 401, 412, 422, 423, 424; 12 credits of teacher education requirements: CI 403 student teaching practicum; 5 credits of statutory requirements: PSY 370 and RDG 330. Total credits: 84-87.

Note:

Physical education teacher certification majors and minors are required to take BIO 103* or 105* or MIC 100*, and HPR 105* to meet prerequisite requirements for advanced courses. It is recommended that all incoming freshmen wishing to major in exercise and sport science - physical education teacher certification enroll in ESS 112, 117, and 121 during their first year at UWL.

Students should refer to policies identified in the School of Education web page. These policies apply to students in all teacher certification programs. The School of Education Web site has additional information.

Additional Program Requirements

Admission

Admission to the physical education teacher education (PETE) program is competitive and successful completion of application requirements does not guarantee admission into the PETE program. Students who wish to be considered for acceptance into the program will be evaluated using the following criteria: physical fitness assessment reflection, grade point average in foundation courses (ESS 112, 117 , 225, BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100, HPR 105); 2.75 combined cumulative GPA (including transfer grade points), passage of all parts of the PreProfessional Skills Test (PPST), K12 leadership involvement and reflection, a satisfactory interview with PETE admission committee members, and a background check. Approximately thirty students are admitted each semester to the PETE major. Students are allowed to apply for PETE admission twice during their academic career at UWL. Course substitutions may be authorized by the program director. Curriculum changes may result in a revision of courses and other criteria used as admission requirements.

Retention and Advancement

Students admitted into the PETE program must maintain a 2.75 grade point average. In order to enroll in student teaching and clinical courses, students must have earned and maintained a 2.75 combined cumulative GPA and a 2.75 GPA in the major, minor, concentration and professional course work. Passing scores for the PRAXIS II Subject Assessment is required in each certification area prior to entering student teaching.

Aquatics and First Aid Certification

Exercise and Sport Science Teaching majors must possess a current Water Safety Instructor (WSI) and American Red Cross First Aid or equivalent agency certification prior to student teaching

Exercise and Sport Science Major with Fitness Emphasis (College of Science and Health) - 60 credits.

Required courses (57 credits): ESS 115, 201, 205, 206, 281, 302, 303, 320, 323, 344, 355, 368, 410, 442, 443, 447, 449, 450 (12 credits); MKT 309; CST 260 or ENG 307. Electives (3 credits): ESS 100 (Approved Topics - Advanced Yoga, Aerobic Exercise, Cardio Kickboxing, Cross Country Skiing, Cycling, Fitness Walking, Golf, Hip Hop, Indoor Rock Climbing, InLine Skating, Jogging and Fitness, Lifeguard Training, Pilates, Sport Conditioning, Strength Training, Swim Fitness, Tai Chi Chuan, Tennis, Water Exercise, Water Safety Instructor, Yoga) HED 409, 439, 473

* These courses may apply to the General Education requirements. May substitute BIO 103 for BIO 105.

Workshops: A maximum of three credits of approved workshops may be applicable to the fitness emphasis.

General Education Requirements- Exercise and sport science majors with fitness emphasis are required to take BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100, ECO 110, CS 101, HPR 105 to meet prerequisites for advanced courses and/or for admission to the emphasis.

Additional Program Requirements

Admission

Admission to the fitness emphasis is competitive and not all who apply may be accommodated. From those applying each year, approximately 30 will be admitted into the fitness emphasis. Admission and retention process:

  1. To be considered for admission to the exercise and sport science major fitness emphasis, the student must have completed at least 30 semester credits, including General Education credits and the three preadmission core courses (BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100, HPR 105, ESS 115) with a grade of at least "C" in each of these core courses and a cumulative GPA of 2.75.
  2. Applications are due October 1 to be considered for admission to the program spring semester or February 1 to be considered for admission to the program for fall semester. All candidates must meet academic requirements, physical fitness standards and professional and personal qualifications and be approved by the fitness advisory board. Consideration for selection is based on the following criteria: a) cumulative GPA; b) fitness evaluation; c) professional site visitations/observations; d) work experiences; e) writing skills; and f) interview.

Retention and Advancement

1. Once admitted, a 2.75 GPA (cumulative and major) must be maintained and a "C" grade or better must be earned in all required and elective major courses for retention in the program. Students whose GPA falls below 2.75 will be placed on probation for one semester. Failure to achieve a

2.75 GPA (cumulative and major) by the end of the probation semester will result in ineligibility to continue in the program.

2. To be admitted to ESS 450 internship, students must achieve a 2.75 cumulative and major GPA and have successfully completed all program course work.

For complete details regarding application procedures, contact the fitness program director in the department of exercise and sport science.

Exercise and Sport Science Major with Sport Management Emphasis

(College of Science and Health)- 58 credits - Required courses (52 credits): ESS 115, 201, 205, 206, 302, 303, 320, 410, 445, 447, 448, 449, 450 (12 credits); ACC 221; MGT 308; MKT 309; MGT 300 or CST 260 or ENG 307. Electives (6 credits): ESS 281, 323, 349, 368, 442; ECO 320; FIN 355; HED 409, 439, 473; MGT 205, 305, 385; MKT 365, 444; REC 305.

Workshops: A maximum of three credits of approved workshops may be applicable to the sport management emphasis.

General Education requirements - Exercise and sport science majors with sport management emphasis are required to take BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100, CS 101, and ECO 110 to meet prerequisite for advanced courses and/or for admission to the emphasis. These courses will also fulfill General Education requirements.

 

Additional Program Requirements

Admission

Admission to the sport management emphasis is competitive and not all who apply may be accommodated. From those applying each year, approximately 30 will be admitted into the sport management emphasis. To be considered for admission to the exercise and sport science major sport management emphasis, the student must have:

  1. completed or be "in progress" of completing at least 30 semester credits, including General Education credits and the three preadmission core courses (BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100; CS 101; ESS 115) with a grade of at least "C" in each of these core courses.
  2. a cumulative GPA of 2.75.
  3. Applications are due October 1 to be considered for admission to the program spring semester or February 1 to be considered for admission to the program for fall semester. All candidates must meet academic, professional involvement, physical fitness and personal qualifications and be approved by the Sport Management Advisory Board. Consideration for selection is based on the following criteria: a) cumulative GPA; b) professional involvement; c) professional site visitations/observations/work experiences; d) word processing and writing skills; and e) interview.

Retention and Advancement

  1. Once admitted, a 2.75 GPA (cumulative and major) must be maintained and a "C" grade or better must be earned in all required and elective major courses for retention in the program. Students whose GPA falls below 2.75 will be placed on program probation for one semester. Failure to achieve a 2.75 GPA (cumulative and major) by the end of the probation semester will result in ineligibility to continue in the program.
  2. To be admitted to ESS 450 Internship, students must achieve a cumulative and major GPA and have successfully completed all program course work.
  3. For complete details regarding application procedures, contact the sport management program director in the department of exercise and sport science.

Concentration in Coaching Competitive Athletics

(Teacher Certification and Recreation programs) - 24 credits - Required courses (16-18 credits): ESS 100 Strength Training or ESS 368, ESS 201, 205, 206, 281, 348, 349, 451 (2-3 credits); elective courses (6-8 credits): ESS 130, 207, 249, 302, 303, 323, 348, 368, 404, 410, 451, HED 409, 439, 474, SHE 458.

Concentration in Adapted Physical Education

(Teacher Certification programs) - 15 credits - ESS 233, 430, 435, 436, 437, 439. Students will be required to participate in two adapted physical education clinical experiences (in addition to ESS 231) and student teaching in adapted physical education complete during the regular student teaching. In order to receive the Wisconsin addon Adapted Physical Education 860 certificate, a person must be certified to teach physical education.

Admission Requirements

Admittance into the concentration requires Physical Education Teacher Education program admission; a grade "BC" or higher in ESS 231; completion of required written application; and the approval of the coordinator of adapted physical education.

Retention and Advancement

  1. A "C" grade or higher must be attained in all adapted physical education courses, except for ESS 439 in which a grade of "B" or higher.
  2. A 2.75 GPA is required in the adapted physical education concentration courses.

Concentration in Strength and Conditioning

(All colleges) - 22 credits - ESS 205, 206, 209, 302, 303, 309, 368, 403, 411, 409.

Students in the strength and conditioning concentration receive a theoretical and practical education with a combination of classes and hands-on experience. Graduates are prepared to take the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist examination. These graduates are prepared for employment in a variety of educational, fitness, and sports settings and capacities.

Students who desire a strength and conditioning concentration must apply for entrance into the program. Admission to the strength and conditioning concentration is competitive and not all who apply may be accommodated. From those applying, approximately 30 will be admitted into the strength and conditioning concentration each year. Priority order for admission: 1) ESS majors, 2) health and recreation majors, and 3) other UWL majors. For complete details regarding the application process, contact the strength and conditioning center or the Department of Exercise and Sport Science.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the strength and conditioning concentration, students must:

  1. Have a minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA
  2. Complete and submit application materials by Oct.1st for spring semester enrollment and Feb. 15th for fall semester enrollment
  3. Have completed at least 28 semester credits including BIO 103 or 105 (prerequisite for ESS 205 and 206).
  4. Have completed 100 supervised preclinical hours in strength centers
  5. Possess current CPR certification

Retention and Advancement

  1. A "C" or better in all strength and conditioning courses.
  2. Satisfactory clinical evaluations.
  3. Completion of competencies in strength and conditioning clinicals.
  4. A cumulative GPA of 2.50. Note: students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 to register for ESS 403 and 411.)
  5. Maintain current CPR certification.

Practical Experience

Students must complete 350 supervised laboratory hours in one of three UWL strength centers. Much of this practical experience is accomplished in the 100 hour preclinical requirement and the three clinical courses. This experience is designed to give students practice designing and implementing strength and conditioning programs.

The exercise and sport science department incorporates a significant amount of writing through the required courses instead of identifying particular courses as writing emphasis courses. Students who complete the ESS major, including any of the emphases, will fulfill the university writing emphasis requirement.


+ next to a course number indicates a General Education course.


ESS 100 Cr. 1 Physical Activities

A program of instruction to enhance participation in physical activities throughout one's lifetime. The primary emphases for specific activities may include acquiring a knowledge base, learning new skills and/or refining skills, developing components of health-related fitness, enhancing affective skills. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail grading.

+ ESS 104 Cr. 2 Dance Appreciation

This course attempts to develop an awareness and appreciation of the role of dance in human society through the study of its purposes, functions and various forms.

+ HPR 105 Cr. 3 Creating a Healthy, Active Lifestyle

This course will focus on the knowledge and skills necessary for developing and maintaining a healthy, physically active lifestyle throughout one's lifespan. Major issues directly affecting one's health such as physical fitness, movement skills and activities, health promotion and disease prevention, the effective use of leisure and content in various wellness topical areas will be included.

HPR/HP 106 Cr. 2 Introduction to Health Related Careers

Overview of health related professions in the health delivery system. Course will include educational and professional aspects of a broad range of health related careers. General topics will include an overview of the health related delivery system, health reform, legal and ethical issues, and professionalism. An interdisciplinary approach will be utilized to present specific information on individual health related professions. (Cross-listed with HP; may only earn credit in HPR or HP.)

ESS 112 Cr. 4 Fundamentals of Movement

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the development of fundamental movement skills and movement concepts related to the elementary physical education student. Emphasis is placed on attaining knowledge of developmentally appropriate practices for the elementary physical education student. This course includes fundamental movements, educational games, and educational dance.

ESS 113 Cr. 1 Basic Swimming

This course is open to Exercise and Sport Science majors and minors only. Emphasis is placed on the improvement of the individual student's swimming skill. Course content ranges from the non-swimmer level through American Red Cross intermediate skill level. Physical education teaching majors and minors are required to enroll in ESS 113 unless they hold one of the following American Red Cross certifications: Water Safety Instructor or Lifeguard Training.

ESS 115 Cr. 2 Orientation to Exercise and Sport Science

This course is designed to introduce the Exercise and Sport Science major to the profession of exercise and sport science and to give insight into the many diverse careers that can result from studying the discipline. Background knowledge of the foundations of the profession and the selection of a career path that reflects personal interests and abilities will be the focus.

ESS 116 Cr. 2 Water Safety Instruction

This course is designed to cover the basic components for certification by the ARC including infant and preschool, Longfellow's Whale Tales, progressive instruction, safety training for swim coaches and basic and emergency water safety. Upon successful completion of this course the student will be certified to instruct aquatics by the American Red Cross.

ESS 117 Cr. 2 Health Related Fitness Activities in Physical Education

This course is designed to help students start to understand health-related fitness self-efficacy promotion through lifetime physical activity applications. Students will focus on exercise prescription design and goal setting strategies linked to skill development in fitness related activities. This activity-based course will focus on fitness principle applications as they relate to cardiovascular, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition activities. Pedagogical strategies and the Personalized System of Instruction model will be introduced for health related fitness activity integration. Lect. 1, Lab 2.

ESS 121 Cr. 2 Adventure Theory for Physical Educators

This course presents the concepts of adventure education including cooperative and initiative games. The students will learn to use and implement a ropes course as a classroom for different age groups and diverse populations, especially as applied to physical education programs. Much of the emphasis of the adventure theory will be introducing the teaching and methodology of adventure education. This course introduces undergraduate students to teaching adventure education in elementary and secondary physical education programs in the schools.

ESS 130 Cr. 1-2 Officiating Athletics

Provides a general background of the rules, interpretations and mechanics of officiating athletic events at various levels of competition. Knowledge in this area may lead to WIAA certification in the following sports: basketball, baseball, football, gymnastics, swimming, track and field, volleyball, and wrestling. Repeatable for credit.

ESS 181 Cr. 3 Introduction to Sports Medicine

An introductory course designed to provide insight into the areas of sports medicine. Fundamental emergency care procedures and wrapping/taping techniques are taught. Students are exposed to athletic training room procedures, accident forms, maintenance of equipment and use of athletic training materials. Enrollment in the course is dependent on an application/ selection process. See requirements for athletic training emphasis. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 201 Cr. 1 Safety, First Aid and CPR

Instruction and practice in proper first aid principles, procedures and emergency care including CPR training. American National Red Cross Standard First Aid certification and CPR certification will be awarded to those students who meet certification requirements. One lecture/lab for seven weeks.

ESS 205 Cr. 3 Human Anatomy

This course is designed to cover the structure and function of the muscular, nervous skeletal, sensory, and integumentary systems. Emphasis will be placed on the musculoskeletal system during the laboratory component. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100. (Not open for credit to students who have had BIO 312.)

ESS 206 Cr. 3 Human Physiology

This course is designed to cover the structure and function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, endocrine, reproductive, digestive and renal systems. Metabolism will also be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on exercise physiology during the laboratory component. Lect. 2. Lab. 2. ESS 206 may precede ESS 205 or may be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or 105 or MIC 100. (Not open for credit to students who have had BIO 313.)

ESS 207 Cr. 3 Human Motor Behavior

This course is an investigation into the nature of human motor development, motor control, and motor learning. Topics will be approached from a constraints perspective, focusing on the interaction among the individual, the environment, and the task. Prerequisite: ESS PE majors must have ESS 112. Lect. 2, Lab 2.

ESS 209 Cr. 2 Strength Training Clinical I

A course designed to provide practical experience in the supervision of a strength center. Students will have the opportunity to instruct proper lifting technique, assist with the assessment of strength, power and speed, and learn facility and equipment maintenance. Lab. 4. Prerequisite: acceptance into strength and conditioning concentration; ESS 205 or 206 (can be concurrent). Pass/Fail grading.

ESS 225 Cr. 3 Introduction to Instruction

This course focuses on knowledge and growth in the art and science of teaching, including clinical observation of physical education at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Content includes the characteristics and behaviors of effective teaching, classroom management theories and practices, and meeting the diverse needs of K12 students. Emphasis is on learning to plan for quality instruction in physical education settings. Students will begin development of electronic portfolios. Lect. 2, Lab 2.

ESS 231 Cr. 3 Introduction to Adapted Physical Education

This course is designed to introduce future teachers to the process of teaching physical education to PK12 students with disabilities. Course content includes general characteristics of selected disabilities and how these disabilities impact a person's movement potential and performance, the federal and state laws pertaining to the education of PK12 students with disabilities, the process of special education referral and placement of students in the least restrictive environment, appropriate physical education teaching methods to use for inclusive instructional settings, adapted teaching techniques for motor development, health-related fitness, sport/recreational skills, and aquatics; and behavior management techniques. In addition, all students are required participate in the UW-La Crosse Motor Development Program conducted on Thursday evenings for approximately 25 clinical education hours for the semester. Prerequisite: ESS 207, 225, or concurrent enrollment. Lect. 2, Lab 3.

ESS 233 Cr. 2 Teaching Methods in Adapted Aquatics

This course focuses on strategies and techniques for teaching persons who are disabled in an aquatic setting. Emphasis is placed on program and teacher effectiveness. Two hour lab required. Students are expected to have intermediate level swimming skills. Prerequisite: ESS 231 or RTH 326. Priority enrollment will be given to students admitted to the Adapted Physical Education concentration. Lect. 1, Lab 2.

ESS 249 Cr. 2 Youth Sport Issues

An investigation of how youth sport programs can provide a healthy experience for participants. Concepts dealing with when to teach sport techniques and the physical, psychological and social implications of athletic experiences will be covered.

ESS 258 Cr. 3 Teaching Activities I

An activity-based course focused on the movement skills as they relate to children in grades 312 within team, individual and leisure activities. The main purpose is for the students to develop the knowledge of the basic skills and progressions related to each activity. There will be two team, two individual, and two leisure activities selected from, but not limited to, the following activities: team (soccer, basketball, ultimate frisbee, field games, speedball, speedaway, gator ball), individual (badminton, bowling), leisure (yoga, pilates, fitness walking). Prerequisite: Admission to the ESS Physical Education Teacher Education program. Lab 6.

ESS/PSY/WS 259 Cr. 1 Girls and Women in Sport

An introduction to the involvement of girls and women with sport. Topics include a historical perspective on women’s sport participation, cultural images of women athletes, physiological and psychological benefits of sport participation as well as negative correlates, teaching and coaching implications of current research, Title IX, and recreation/leisure approaches to physical activity. (Cross-listed with PSY and WS; may only earn credit in ESS, PSY, or WS.)

ESS 261 Cr. 2 Educational Gymnastics

This course prepares the student to safely plan and conduct an educational gymnastics curriculum through the study of jumping and landing, balance, hanging and swinging, and rolling and transfer of weight activities. Emphasis is on appropriate progressions, safety procedures, proper mechanics, and sequencing of skills, methodology, fitness and games within a gymnastics environment and error analysis on a variety of gymnastics apparatus. Course will include 46 clinical hours with school children. Prerequisite: ESS 112. Lect. 1, Lab 2.

ESS 281 Cr. 2 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries

Gives students who are interested in interscholastic athletics part of the necessary background to become a qualified coach or director. This course includes: common injuries occurring as a result of participating in athletics and physical education activities; procedures and techniques in the prevention and care of injuries; and the understanding of the coaches' and teachers' roles in the care of injuries. Prerequisite: ESS 201 and 205.

ESS 283 Cr. 3 Clinical Pathology for Athletic Trainers

Course designed to introduce students to the pathology of injuries and illnesses treated by athletic trainers. Topics included are categorized into physiological responses to trauma, disease, inflammatory responses and autoimmune/immunodeficiency responses to various diseases. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the athletic training program.

ESS 286 Cr. 2 Athletic Training Clinical I

A course designed to provide clinical experiences in an athletic training setting. Students will have the opportunity to gain competency in skills that have been previously instructed and practiced in classroom and laboratory settings. Prerequisite: ESS 181 and acceptance to the athletic training program. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 287 Cr. 2 Athletic Training Clinical II

A course designed to provide clinical experiences in an athletic training setting. Students will have an opportunity to gain competency in upper extremity evaluation skills, and management of pathologies of the upper extremity, trunk/thorax and the head and neck that are common in athletics. Prerequisites: ESS 286. Offered Sem. II.

ESS 302 Cr. 2 Physiology of Exercise

Applied physiology: a study of how normal physiological function (homeostasis) is altered, and subsequently restored, in response to various forms of stress (exercise and training). Prerequisite: BIO 103 or 105, a grade of "C" or better in ESS 206.

ESS 303 Cr. 2 Biomechanics

Biomechanics emphasizes the investigation and application of mechanical principles to the study of human motion and the motion of sport objects. Students will learn systematic approaches for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the human body as it engages in motor activities. Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in ESS 205. Recommended: MTH 150, 151, or 207.

ESS 309 Cr. 2 Strength Training Clinical II

A course designed to provide experience in the supervision of a strength center. Students will have the opportunity to instruct proper lifting technique, assess strength, power and speed, maintain the strength facility, and assist with the design of lifting and conditioning programs. Lab. 4. Prerequisite: ESS 209. Pass/Fail grading.

ESS 310 Cr. 2 Teaching Outdoor Activities in Physical Education

This course will focus on teaching physical educators how to implement outdoor activities as part of the K12 physical education curriculum. Included are such activities as hiking, backpacking, climbing, skiing, primitive camping, canoeing, snowshoeing, and biking. Common pedagogical knowledge and skills which cut across activities will be emphasized. Students will participate in the scope and sequence for skill development in at least two outdoor activities, and plan the scope and sequence for one additional outdoor activity. Open to Exercise and Sport Science majors only. Prerequisite: ESS 121, 225. Lect. 4, Lab. 1.

ESS 320 Cr. 3 Field Experience in Fitness or Sport Management

Practical experience in a fitness and/or sports management setting. Experiences provided may include: sports event facilitation, budget preparation and monitoring, preparing contracts, checking eligibility, marketing and promotion, exercise leadership, assisting with fitness assessment and exercise prescription. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the ESS major - fitness or sport management emphasis.

ESS 321 Cr. 2 Evaluation in Health Education and Physical Education

An introductory course in the meaning and application of measurement, tests, elementary statistical procedures and evaluation in physical education. Prerequisite: Admission into teacher education.

ESS 322 Cr. 4 Elementary Methods, Assessment and Clinical in Physical Education

A junior level pedagogy course focused on developmentally appropriate methodology and assessment for the elementary physical education setting. Emphasis is placed on developing the capability to apply an understanding of planning for learning for the K5 student. This course includes completion of a clinical experience in the elementary physical education setting. Prerequisite: ESS 207 or concurrent enrollment and admission to the physical education teacher education program. Lect. 3, Lab. 2.

ESS 323 Cr. 2 Nutrition and Sport

Basic principles of human nutrition and nutritional needs for athletes and/or active populations. Issues discussed include ergogenic aids, carbohydrate loading/manipulation, eating disorders, and protein supplementation. Practical application will include dietary analysis and composition for people in various activities and conditions. Prerequisite: ESS 02 or NUT 200.

ESS 324 Cr. 1-3 Individual Problems in Physical Education

Provides an opportunity for physical education majors or minors to pursue specific subject areas within their programs of study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department chair. Repeatable for credit maximum 6.

ESS 325 Cr. 4 Secondary Methods, Assessment and Clinical in Physical Education

A junior level pedagogy course focused on developmentally appropriate methodology and assessment for the secondary physical education setting. Emphasis is placed on developing the capability to apply an understanding of planning for learning for the 612 student. This course includes completion of a clinical experience in the secondary physical education setting. Prerequisite: Admission into the physical education teacher education program. Prerequisite: ESS 207. Lect. 3, Lab. 2.

ESS 326 Cr. 2 Clinical Experience in Teaching Physical Education II

Students will practice teaching with close supervision of both the university instructor and the elementary/middle school cooperating teacher. The students will learn to use objective analysis instruments, videotaping, computer analysis techniques, and intervention processes. Students will have a minimum of 48 hours of public school clinical experiences. Must be taken concurrently with ESS 321, 322, 325. Prerequisite: admission into teacher education.

ESS 327 Cr. 2 Physical Education for the Elementary Classroom Teacher

Students participate in lecture and laboratory experiences to gain and practice skills in teaching elementary physical education. Applied teaching experience occurs at a local school allowing for implementation of appropriate skill progression, movement education management and a variety of curriculum options. Prerequisite: EFN 210 and CI 211. For elementary education majors only. Lect. 1, Lab. 2.

ESS 344 Cr. 3 Introduction to Fitness Assessment

The purpose of this course is to review the clinical and diagnostic approach to cardiovascular anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology, and to provide basic knowledge in evaluation, methodology and interpretation of fitness testing. Areas of emphasis will be population characteristics, participant screening and referral process, alternatives of fitness assessment and exercise prescription. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: ESS 302 and acceptance into the ESS major - fitness emphasis.

ESS 348 Cr. 2 Theory of Coaching (specific sports as listed)

Theory of coaching specific competitive sports. Coaching and directing youth, club, interscholastic and intercollegiate sports programs. Theory of coaching the following sports will be offered on a rotational basis: baseball/softball, basketball, football, gymnastics, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field/cross country, volleyball, and wrestling. Prerequisite: junior standing. A competitive background in and fundamental knowledge of the sport is HIGHLY recommended. Repeatable for credit - maximum 4.

ESS 349/549 Cr. 2 Psychology of Coaching Competitive Athletics

Aids the prospective coach to better understand the application of psychological concepts to the coaching of sports. Emphasis will be on the methods of improving the performance of athletes through a better understanding of the factors affecting teaching and learning in athletics.

ESS 355 Cr. 3 Methods of Exercise Leadership

This course will cover the methodology of developing, teaching and leading sound exercise workouts for all levels of physiological fitness and for individual needs. Prerequisite: ESS 302, 303, and acceptance into the ESS major - fitness emphasis. Lect. 2, Lab 2.

ESS 367 Cr. 3 Teaching Activities II

An activity-based course focused on movement skills as they relate to children in grades 312 within team, individual and leisure activities. The main purpose is for the students to develop the knowledge of the basic skills and progressions related to each activity. There will be two team, two individual, and two leisure activities selected from, but not limited to, the following activities: team (softball, volleyball, team handball, flag football, ultimate frisbee), individual (golf, tennis), leisure (archery, cardio kickboxing, inline skating). Prerequisite: Admission to the physical education teacher education program. Lab 6.

ESS 368 Cr. 2 Strength Training Techniques and Programs

This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of proper lifting and spotting technique, an understanding of the various types of equipment and modes of strength training, basic program design and programming for special populations, and weight training for competition. Students will be taught to design and individualize a strength training program. Prerequisite: ESS 205 and 206. ESS 100 Strength Training recommended.

ESS 378 Cr. 4 Athletic Injury Assessment Techniques - Lower Body

This course is designed for individuals seeking certification from the Board of Certification (BOC). Content addresses observation and evaluation techniques for athletic injuries to the lower body. Students must integrate anatomical structures and physiological principles to provide a basis for critical decision-making in an injury management environment. Prerequisite: ESS 286 and 379. Lect. 3, Lab 2. Offered Sem. II.

ESS 379 Cr. 4 Athletic Injury Assessment Techniques - Upper Body

This course is designed to give athletic training students a basis for injury evaluation of the upper body. Evaluations will follow the format of: history, inspection, palpation, range of motion, strength tests, stress tests, special tests, and functional tests. Lecture, demonstration, and practical experience will be the instructional methods used to help students gain knowledge and confidence in their assessment techniques Prerequisite: ESS 181 and admission to the athletic training program. Lect. 3, Lab 2. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 386 Cr. 2 Athletic Training Clinical III

A course designed to provide clinical experience in an athletic training setting. Students will have an opportunity to gain competency in lower extremity evaluation skills, and management of pathologies of the lower extremity that are common in athletics. Prerequisite: ESS 287. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 387 Cr. 2 Athletic Training Clinical IV

A course designed to provide clinical experience in an athletic training setting. Students will have an opportunity to gain competency in utilization of therapeutic modalities for the management of pathologies that are common in athletics. Prerequisite: ESS 386. Offered Sem. II.

ESS 401 Cr. 2 Teaching Dance

Theory and methods of teaching age-appropriate dance activities for students in elementary and secondary physical education. Emphasis will be on skill progressions, teaching models and methods, and assessment. Prerequisite: Admission into the physical education teacher education program. Lect. 1, Lab. 2.

ESS 402 Cr. 1 Advanced Activities

A program of opportunities to enhance advanced teaching knowledge and participation in a self-selected physical activity. The course will go beyond the knowledge, skills and strategies that may be offered at the introductory level. These opportunities may include, but not be limited to, participation in advanced activity classes offered both on and off campus, participation in advanced certification programs, intern teaching experiences in the student's area of expertise. Repeatable for credit in different activities - maximum 3. Only one credit counts toward the PETE major. Prerequisite: ESS 321, 322, 325, 326. Pass/Fail grading.

ESS 403 Cr. 2 Advanced Strength Training Applications and Techniques

This course presents advanced strength training and conditioning theory and practice. Designed primarily for students specializing in strength and conditioning, the course explores advanced periodization models and their utilization, mastery and analysis of Olympic lifts, plyometric programming, ergogenic aids (identification, legal implications, nutritional alternatives,) facility design, and special population needs. Prerequisite: ESS 302, 303, and 368. Offered Sem. II.

ESS 409 Cr. 2 Strength Training Clinical III

A course designed to provide practical experience in management of a strength center. Students will have the opportunity to instruct proper lifting technique, assess strength, power and speed, maintain the strength facility, design lifting and conditioning programs, and assist with the supervision and instruction of junior staff members. Lab. 4. Prerequisite: ESS 302, 303, 309, 368.

ESS 410 Cr. 2 Legal Implications of Sport and Activity

The demands of today's young people and adults can be met more effectively if professional personnel concerned with the operation of physical education programs, competitive athletic programs as well as community and commercial fitness programs, understand the legal aspects of these activities. It is imperative that individuals enjoy the protection of a safe environment. Prerequisite: ESS 201. Must be accepted into the ESS major-fitness or sport management emphasis.

ESS 411 Cr. 2 Strength and Conditioning Educator Training

This course is a capstone experience for students specializing in strength and conditioning. Content includes exercise physiology and biomechanics, nutrition and ergogenic aids, testing and evaluation, exercise techniques, program design, and organization and administration of a strength and conditioning facility. Prerequisite: ESS 403 or concurrent enrollment. Offered Sem. II and summer session.

ESS 412 Cr. 3 Issues and Philosophies in Teaching Physical Education

This course is designed to provide student teachers with an opportunity for communication and discussed focused on student teaching experiences. Course emphasis is placed on development of teaching competencies as outlined by the beginning teacher standards. Prerequisite: Completion of all course work required to student teach, successful completion of PRAXIS II exam. Taken concurrently with Student Teaching. Pass/Fail grading.

ESS 422 Cr. 3 Teaching Healthy, Active Lifestyles

This course provides the pre-service physical education student with the pedagogical skills necessary to promote, advocate for, and empower K12 students to become lifelong learners who value physical activity. The emphasis of this course will focus on health related fitness concepts and applications related to exercise prescription, nutritional planning, exercise adherence, and fitness skill development for students in the K12 setting. Physical education majors will also explore curricular and instructional models that promote and foster health and fitness applications to K12 students. Prerequisite: Admission into the physical education teacher education program, ESS 302 or concurrent enrollment.

ESS 423/523 Cr. 2 Individual and Social Factors in Physical Activity

This course provides the essential theoretical foundations and practical applications of the psychological concepts involved in living a physically active lifestyle. Content will include working with individuals on motivation, anxiety/ stress reduction, self concepts, and character development; working with groups for cohesion, cooperation and competition, conflict resolution, and goal achievement; and development of personal skills and knowledge to achieve desired goals in physical activity environments. Prerequisite: Admission to an exercise and sport science major program.

ESS 424 Cr. 4 Curriculum Development and Administration of Elementary/Secondary Physical Education Programs

Senior level experience designed to provide an understanding of the curriculum development process through application. Selection of activities based on national and state standards, community resources, growth and developmental characteristics and facilities. Includes content and experiences related to PK12 program development including scope and sequence, program evaluation, scheduling, advocacy activity and co-curricular/outside school activities. The administrative component will include principles related to gender equity, risk management, budgeting, collaboration, and program accountability. Prerequisite: Admission into the physical education teacher education program, senior standing.

ESS 430/530 Cr. 4 Causes and Effects of Developmental, Physical and Sensory Disorders

The etiology and effects of selected physical, sensory, mental, and emotional disorders. Content includes the full range of each category - mild through severe/profound and the role of physical education in the educational program. Students in the special physical education concentration are given priority in enrollment. Prerequisite: ESS 231 or RTH 326.

ESS 435/535 Cr. 2 Sports for Persons with Disabilities

This course provides an introduction to appropriate instruments and testing strategies necessary for assessing the gross motor development and health-related physical fitness levels of persons with disabilities. Students learn how to administer, interpret, and use the results of motor assessments to develop individualized education program plans that are utilized in either adapted or general physical education programs for students with disabilities. Prerequisite: ESS 231. Priority enrollment will be given to students admitted to the adapted physical education concentration. Offered Sem. II.

ESS 436/536 Cr. 3 Assessment and Program Evaluation in Adapted Physical Education

This course provides an introduction to appropriate instruments and testing strategies necessary for assessing the gross motor development and health-related physical fitness levels of persons with disabilities. Students learn how to administer, interpret, and use the results of motor assessments to develop individualized education program plans that are utilized in either adapted or general physical education programs for students with disabilities. Priority enrollment will be given to students admitted to the Adapted Physical Education concentration. Prerequisite: ESS 231. Offered Sem. II and summers as needed.

ESS 437 Cr. 3 Teaching and Service Delivery Models in Adapted Physical Education

This course focuses on adapted physical education teaching strategies and service delivery models in PK12 settings. Instructional programming and best practices in early childhood, elementary, middle/secondary, and transitional programs for students with disabilities in adapted physical education are covered. Emphasis is on collaboration among professional service providers such as special educators, regular physical educators, and related service personnel. (e.g. occupational, physical, and recreational therapists), as well as health and other community agency staff. School psychology visits and practical teaching are included, along with guest presentations on related disciplines and program. Prerequisite: Admission to the adapted physical education concentration; ESS 436, or concurrent enrollment.

ESS 439 Cr. 3 Teaching Methods and Internship in Adapted Physical Education

Students are provided practical teaching and supervision opportunities to enhance their skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating adapted physical education programs for children and youth with a variety of disabilities. Emphasis is also placed on effective staff collaboration and consultation as well as teacher and program supervision. A Saturday morning laboratory is required during fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite: 3 of the following courses: ESS 233, 430, 436, 437. Lect. 2, Lab 3.

ESS 442 Cr. 2 Aging and Physical Activity

The course will explore why and how physical activity must change to meet the modifications that occur to the human body with aging. The physiological and psychological status of an aging population will be presented, along with suggestions to address the physical activity needs of this growing group. Practical experience in both on and off campus sites. Prerequisite: ESS 302. Must be accepted into ESS major-fitness emphasis or have a declared emphasis in Gerontology.

ESS 443 Cr. 3 Youth and Family Fitness

This course addresses the principles and procedures for designing physical fitness experiences for children and families. Lecture, practice, and field experiences are included. Prerequisite: ESS 302, 303 (or concurrent enrollment), and acceptance into the ESS major - fitness emphasis.

ESS 445/545 Cr. 3 Planning Facilities for Physical Activity and Sport

A study of planning techniques concerning facility development and maintenance for schools, athletic clubs, fitness centers and professional sport organizations. Prerequisite: Acceptance to sport management emphasis or ESS graduate program.

ESS 447 Cr. 3 Administration in Fitness and Sport

The course will cover principles of administrative theory and practice in the fitness and sport industry, including general administrative functions, public relations, personnel, budget and finance, facility management, and evaluation techniques. Prerequisite: acceptance into the ESS major - either fitness emphasis or sport management emphasis.

ESS 448 Cr. 3 Promotion and Development of Fitness and Sport Programs

This course will provide understanding of and skill in the promotion process as it relates to advertising and public relations activities for the operation of programs in sport, physical education and fitness. Primary focus will be on the application of promotion principles to specific sport scenarios. Prerequisite: MKT 309, MGT 308. Must be accepted into the ESS major -  fitness or sport management emphasis. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 449 Cr. 1 Seminar in Fitness/Sports Management

An in-depth orientation to the required senior internship experience. Required course to be taken one semester prior to internship. Prerequisite: GPA of 2.75 (cumulative and major), acceptance into the ESS Major - fitness or sport management emphasis, senior standing.

ESS 450 Cr.8or12 Exercise and Sport Science Internship

The internship is designed to be a terminal experience for students majoring in fitness or sport management (12 credits) emphases and athletic training (eight credits) with an intensive supervised practical work experience. Prerequisite: fitness/sport management: all course work for the appropriate major must be completed, and a minimum cumulative and emphasis GPA of 2.75; athletic training: ESS 484. Pass/Fail grading for all emphases.

ESS 451 Cr. 2-3 Practicum in Athletic Coaching

The practicum in athletic coaching is designed to be a terminal experience for students completing the concentration in Coaching Competitive Athletics. Students will be placed with department approved university or public/private school athletic teams to obtain practical coaching experience in the sport(s) of their choice. The practicum experience will be supervised by coaches of the assigned team and the director of the concentration in coaching competitive athletics. Prerequisite: completion of requirements in coaching concentration with the exception of ESS 368 and 404 and elective credits. Repeatable for credit in different sport(s) - maximum 6. Pass/Fail grading.

ESS 452/552 Cr. 2 Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

An in depth study of lifestyle principles as identified by Stephen Covey in the book 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Students will explore how to apply these principles as teachers and coaches personally and with peers, students and athletes. Prerequisite: senior standing.

ESS 460/560 Cr. 1-3 Exercise Science Clinical Forum

Visiting lecturers as well as university professors will address various topics related to exercise science. Repeatable for credit.

ESS 480/680 Cr. 2 Injury Prevention, Management and Rehabilitation

Designed to assist the student in refinement of skills in prevention, management and rehabilitation of injuries occurring in a high activity environment. Special attention will be given to injury recognition and common injuries. Basic rehabilitation protocols will be reviewed in addition to conditions for referral. Prerequisite: teaching and/or coaching experience.

ESS 481 Cr. 4 Therapeutic Modalities or Athletic Training

Introduction and overview of the principles and therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of athletic injuries and the role of rehabilitation in athletic training. Course is designed for students interested in taking the certification examination from the Board of Certification (BOC). Prerequisite: ESS 287 and 378. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 483 Cr. 3 Administration of Athletic Training Programs

A study and analysis of administrative policies involved in the management of an efficient athletic training program. Course is designed to provide information in program and strategic planning, evaluation of plans, record keeping, facility design and planning, budgeting and purchasing, inventory control, management of human resources, and governance structures in athletic training. Prerequisite: ESS 387 and 484. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 484 Cr. 4 Rehabilitation Techniques for Athletic Injuries

This course covers the knowledge and skills needed in the rehabilitation of specific injuries received in recreational and sports participation. Rehabilitation strategies are designed to utilize rehabilitation principles and functional activities to prepare patients for safe return to full sports and physical activity. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: ESS 481 and ESS 386. Offered Sem. II.

ESS 485 Cr. 3 Current Readings and Research in Athletic Training

This course is designed to give students an overview of the research process in athletic training. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of building a research base in athletic training, the basics of developing a research study, protecting human subjects, presenting and publishing data, manuscripts review, and fundamentals of grant writing. Students will also review and discuss current published research in the field and give presentations pertaining to special topics not included in regular course work. Prerequisite: ESS 483 and 486. Offered Sem. II.

ESS 486 Cr. 2 Athletic Training Clinical V

A course designed to provide clinical experience in an athletic training setting. Students will have an opportunity to gain competency in rehabilitation and management of pathologies that are common in athletics. Prerequisite: ESS 387. Offered Sem. I.

ESS 499 Cr. 3 Seminar in Physical Education

The provision of intensified experiences in the solution of some individual or group problem. The utilization of some rudimentary research techniques receive marked attention, including the formulation of hypotheses, the design of study, the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data. Prerequisite: open to students of "honor" quality having senior class standing, a minimum 2.75 grade point average will be required. Offered occasionally.