CLINICAL SCIENCE (CSC)

Professors: Taylor, Weeks; Associate Professors: Martin, McCoy, Perry, Zellmer (Chair);
Assistant Professors: Huffman, Scheuermann, Uphoff;
Lecturers: Garland, Heinz, Kratz, Majewski, Rathgaber, Saeger, Temple, Wessels.

The Clinical Science Department includes five health professions programs. These programs include the following: Medical Laboratory Science (MLS), Occupational Therapy (O-T), Physician Assistant Studies (PA), Radiation Sciences: Nuclear Medical Technology (NMT), and Radiation Sciences: Radiation Therapy (R-T). Each of these programs has an identified professional curriculum including both didactic and clinical experiences which leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. Each program has defined pre-professional prerequisites and admission criteria which must be completed before seeking admission to the professional program. The MLS, O-T, PA and R-T programs all either hold or are pursuing programmatic accreditation with their professions' accrediting agency. The NMT program has academic relationships with several hospital-based programs which hold the NMT professional program accreditation. Further information about each of the Clinical Science Department's programs is found below.

The department's faculty and instructional academic staff includes those involved directly with each of these programs and those involved with multiple programs in the department. The department has several courses which allow pre-professional students to explore the various health professions and aspects of healthcare. Recognizing the significant academic contributions to the department by professionals in the clinical setting, numerous clinicians from many disciplines hold clinical, adjunct and CSC academic staff appointments. See p. 269 for a listing of those individuals.

CSC/HPR 106 Cr. 2
Introduction to Health Related Careers
Overview of health related professions in the health delivery system. Course will include educational and professional aspects of a broad range of health related careers. General topics will include an overview of the health related delivery system, health reform, legal and ethical issues, and professionalism. An interdisciplinary approach will be utilized to present specific information on individual health related professions. (Cross-listed with HPR; may only earn credit in CSC or HPR.)

CSC 350 Cr. 1-3
Topics in Clinical Science
Topics for this course are selected by the instructor and/or as developed by student/faculty dialogue to meet special interests and needs of students. These topics are relevant to pre-professional physician assistant education or others interested in health care careers, but are not found elsewhere in the university curriculum. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6.

CSC 421/P-T 521 Cr. 5
Human Gross Anatomy
A comprehensive consideration of the human anatomy including both neuromusculoskeletal components and internal organs. The course includes the complete regional dissection of the human cadaver. Biomechanical function, topographic and radiographic correlations, and clinical applications are emphasized. Prerequisite: admission to the physician assistant program, occupational therapy program or consent of the instructor. (Cross-listed with P-T 521; may only earn credit in CSC 421 or P-T 521, not both.) Offered summer session.

Physician Assistant Studies

See College of Science and Allied Health,

Associate Professor: Zellmer (Program Director); Lecturers: Garland, Kratz, Majewski.

Physician Assistant Studies Major -
(Science and Allied Health)

Pre-professional requirements -
The following courses must be completed prior to admission to the professional curriculum or may be waived by the PA program director based on review by the PA program admission committee: BIO 101, 312, 313; MIC 230; CHM 103, 104; PSY 100; MTH 205 or 305; MTH 151 or 207; one of the following: BIO 306, 308, 361, or 424; one of the following: CHM 300 or (303, 304 and 305); one of the following: CHM 325, (CHM 417 and 418), BIO 315, or 435. The following additional courses are recommended: PHY 125 or (103 and 104) or (203 and 204), and an additional psychology or sociology course.

Professional core requirements -

Preclinical phase - 62 credits including CSC 421, 422, 425, 426, 427, 428, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 436; BIO 718, 719; CHM 427; HED 495.

Clinical phase - 54 credits including CSC 460, 461, 462, 463, 464, 465, 466,467, 470 (4 credits), 475. In addition, students must pass the PA program's summative exam, and be approved for graduation by the program's student progress and conduct committee.

Admission to the physician assistant program is competitive with a class of 12 students admitted annually from an applicant pool of approximately 200. Application materials are available in July of each year with a late November deadline for classes starting the following June. Most students selected for the program already hold a baccalaureate degree and have some health care experience.

At the time of application, candidates must have the preprofessional curriculum completed, or be able to demonstrate a plan to complete these courses prior to enrollment in the program. In addition to these specific course prerequisites, candidates must also complete the UW-L General Education program, or already hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college; have completed a total of at least 90 semester credits; have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00; and meet the program's Technical Standards of Performance (available in program materials). Candidates lacking one or more of the preprofessional course requirements or the minimum GPA who have significant work and life experience may also be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Factors considered in the admission process include:

1. Academic preparation

2. Motivation, maturity, ability to work with people, and suitability for clinical practice

3. Health care and other work experience

4. Knowledge of the PA profession and the profession's role in the health care system

5. Background in rural Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa, and potential for future practice in rural areas and to meet the needs of underserved populations in southwestern Wisconsin, southern Minnesota and northeastern Iowa

6. Letters of recommendation

7. Personal and group interviews

CSC 422 Cr. 1
Clinical Neuroanatomy
This course provides the student an understanding of the structure, organization and function of the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems including the vascular supply to each of these components. This provides the basis for appreciating the anatomical basis of more common neurologic disorders and neurologic testing. Cadaveric specimens are used in the laboratory. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 425 Cr. 5
Medical Pathophysiology
The study of pathophysiology provides the understanding of the nature and mechanisms of disease which is the foundation for critical thinking in clinical practice. This course provides a systematic approach to the physiologic basis for disease. The general pathology of cell injury, inflammation, infection and neoplasia is presented along with the disease processes of organ systems including the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, neurologic, renal, urinary, reproductive, musculo- skeletal, immunological, endocrine, dermatological, and hematological systems. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 426 Cr. 2
Clinical Pathology
Through participation in this course, students will gain an understanding of the technologies used in the performance of clinical diagnostic tests, be able to interpret these tests, and make appropriate clinical correlations for patients states of disease and health. Students will also develop competencies in the performance of selected laboratory tests. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 427 Cr. 5
Medical Pharmacology
This course represents a broad survey of the general principles of pharmacology. Included are the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics, the mechanisms of action, toxicities and interactions of specific drugs and drug groups, and an introduction to medical therapeutics. The physiologic basis and clinical characteristics of disease states receptive to pharmacologic therapy will also be discussed. The objective of the course is to lay a cognitive foundation in pharmacology and therapeutics that can be refined and applied in clinical practice. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and/or approval of the PA program director.

CSC 428 Cr. 4
Medical Microbiology
This course is designed to introduce the general principles of infectious diseases and the characteristics of the important pathogens involved. The discussion will focus on the clinical aspects of each infectious disease with a minor emphasis on the microbiology of the disease. A survey of microorganisms that infect human beings, including bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic pathogens, will be covered. In addition, the immune system as it pertains to infectious diseases will also be discussed. A laboratory component will demonstrate techniques utilized in both the clinical laboratory and office settings. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and/or approval of the PA program director.

CSC 430 Cr. 1
Clinical Epidemiology for Interpretation of the Medical Literature
This course presents concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics as applied to the interpretation of the medical literature. Students are ultimately able to review and critique published research from the medical literature, and consider the appropriate assimilation of research into clinical practice. Prerequisite: admission to the physician assistant program.

CSC 431 Cr. 3
Introduction to Clinical Skills and Issues I
This course is the first of a three-semester sequence designed to prepare the physician assistant students for their professional clinical role. This course provides an overview of the PA profession, its history, current role in health care and other issues of professional interest. Students also develop the patient interview and communication skills through classroom and limited structured clinical experiences. An introduction to radiographic anatomy and interpretation is also presented. Prerequisite: admission to the physician assistant program.

CSC 432 Cr. 4
Introduction to Clinical Skills and Issues II
This course is the second of a three-semester sequence designed to prepare the physician assistant student for their professional clinical role. An introduction to the medical history and physical exam are presented and students begin to practice these skills both in the teaching lab and in the clinical setting. Students also explore a variety of issues of current interest to the PA profession. Prerequisite: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 433 Cr. 3
Introduction to Clinical Skills and Issues III
This course is the third of a three-semester sequence designed to prepare the physician assistant student for their professional clinical role. Students continue to develop and refine their patient communication, medical history and physical exam skills. Body system specific and comprehensive medical history and physical exams are performed. Special techniques for the examination of pediatric and electrocardiogram interpretation are also explored. Other profes-sional issues are also considered including medical ethics, spiritual and legal aspects of medical practice. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 434 Cr. 2
Wellness, Preventive Medicine and Healthcare Systems for Physician Assistants
This course presents theories and principles of health and wellness education programs and prevention strategies in clinical practice. It also provides the student with an understanding of current health care and reimbursement systems, their operation and impact on community health and medical practice. This course is taught collaboratively with the Department of Health Education and Health Promotion. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 435 Cr. 2
Physical Diagnosis and Clinical Skills
Developing a variety of procedural skills and refining student skills in performing and interpreting the medical history and physical exam are the primary purposes of this course.Students learn various surgical protocols and procedures along with other standard diagnostic and hospital procedures typically used in primary care practice. Clinical staff from the Mayo School of Health Related Sciences take responsibility for presenting this course which is only taught in Rochester during a 12-week summer session. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 436 Cr. 12
Introduction to Clinical Medicine
This course provides a comprehensive presentation of primary care focused topics across the spectrum of clinical medicine. The course is designed to allow PA students to develop the critical clinical reasoning skills, and an advanced understanding of disease processes and their treatment, necessary for the supervised practice of medicine. Clinical staff from the Mayo School of Health Related Sciences take responsibility for presenting this course which is only taught in Rochester during a 12-week summer session. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 450 Cr. 1-3
Topics in Clinical Science for Physician Assistant Students
Topics for this course are selected by the instructor and/or as developed by student/faculty dialogue to meet special interests and needs of students in the physician assistant professional curriculum. Such topics are chosen from those not specifically presented within the required or existing PA program curriculum. Prerequisite: admission to the physician assistant program. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6.

CSC 460 Cr. 2
Dermatology Clinical Rotation
In the two-week dermatology rotation, students have a brief but intense exposure to the wide variety of skin conditions while developing skills in the recognition and treatments for these conditions. Because these experiences generally occur in secondary referral practices, students also come to appreciate the role of a consulting dermatologist in the provision of primary care. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for a written examination at the end of the rotation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 461 Cr. 4
Emergency Medicine Clinical Rotation
This four-week rotation allows the student to develop skills in managing patients in the emergency room setting. These skills include those necessary for appropriate triage, stabilization, and initial management of patients with traumatic injuries and illnesses, the management of the less life threatening problems which present to the emergency room, working with the pre-hospital emergency medical service team, and making appropriate secondary referrals. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for a written examination at the end of the rotation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 462 Cr. 6
General Surgery Clinical Rotation
This six-week rotation is designed to prepare the student to function as an assistant to the surgeon in the primary or secondary care setting. Students assist in surgical procedures in the operating room, the diagnostic evaluation of surgical patients, with post-operative care and with the ambulatory care of surgical patients. Proficiency is to be developed in suturing, incision and drainage, excision and the biopsy of simple wounds and lesions. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for a written examination at the end of the rotation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 463 Cr. 6
Internal Medicine Clinical Rotation
During the six-week internal medicine rotation, physician assistant students become a part of an internal medicine practice caring for adult and geriatric patients. Students perform patient history and physical examinations, obtain diagnostic testing and present the data to their precepting physician(s) with a proposed differential diagnosis and treatment plan. Students function in a role similar to the intended role of a practicing physician assistant, including participation in hospital rounds where diagnostic and therapeutic plans for acutely ill patients are discussed, performing and observing various clinical procedures, and preparing written and oral communication about patients. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for a written examination at the end of the rotation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 464 Cr. 6
Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinical Rotation
This six-week rotation provides an opportunity for the physician assistant student to develop skills in the management of obstetrical patients during the antenatal, perinatal and post natal periods. Students also have experience in managing common outpatient gynecology problems, gynecologic diagnostic techniques and therapy, family planning, assisting at gynecologic surgery, and techniques for the early detection of gynecologic cancer. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for a written examination at the end of the rotation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 465 Cr. 4
Orthopedics Clinical Rotation
The orthopedic clinical rotation, four weeks in length, is designed to develop student skills necessary for the care of patients with orthopedic problems including fractures, wounds, soft tissue injuries, and degenerative conditions found in primary care. Through work with orthopedic surgeons, and other professionals in orthopedic practice, the student gains an appreciation for their roles, and becomes better able to make timely orthopedic referrals in primary care. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for a written examination at the end of the rotation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 466 Cr. 6
Pediatrics Clinical Rotation
During the six-week pediatric rotation the physician assistant student has an intense exposure to primary care pediatric problems with the objective of developing skills in well child preventive care, the care of common pediatric illnesses and the care of the newborn. These experiences are obtained primarily in the out-patient setting. However, exposure to the acute care of hospitalized pediatric patients is also expected. The student also comes to appreciate and begins to work with the many professionals, such as teachers, psychologists, speech and hearing pathologist, nurses and social workers, involved in the care and evaluation of children. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for a written examination at the end of the rotation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 467 Cr. 4
Psychiatry Clinical Rotation
The clinical rotation in psychiatry, four weeks in length, involves experiences, primarily in out-patient settings, that allow students to develop skills in the evaluation and management of patients with a variety of psychiatric problems. Through these experiences students gain an appreciation for the role of the psychiatrist, psychologist, nurse and social worker in the care of the mentally ill, and becomes better able to make appropriate psychiatric referrals from primary care. The use of psychoactive pharmaceuticals, and the role of psychotherapy in psychiatry are explored in the experience. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for a written examination at the end of the rotation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.

CSC 470 Cr. 2-4
Independent Study: Elective Clinical Rotation(s)
During the preclinical phase and early portion of the clinical phase physician assistant program students consider their own clinical practice interests and needs for skill development. The student selects (a) clinical area(s) for the elective clinical rotation(s) with the approval of program faculty. Students may select elective experiences from specialty areas not included in the required rotations, or in one of the required clinical areas. With the consultation and approval of program faculty the student develops an individualized learning contract which includes objectives for their elective rotations(s), and a method to demonstrate achievement of these objectives at the conclusion of the rotation(s). Where possible and appropriate, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. Students are required to have a total of four credits (four weeks) of elective clinical rotation for graduation. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director. Pass/Fail grading.

CSC 475 Cr. 12
Family Medicine Preceptorship
This 12-week preceptorship provides students with a prolonged experience in one setting during which students refine their skills in performing the history and physical exam, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, and developing treatment plans for the diversity of patients in a typical rural family medicine practice. With this prolonged experience the student begins to appreciate the long term impact of health care on patients' lives and becomes more skilled in preventive health care and the long term management of chronic medical problems. To the extent possible, preceptorship sites include at least two family physicians, one or more physician assistants or nurse practitioners who might practice in a satellite clinic, and a community hospital where students can be involved with acute inpatient care, obstetrical, surgical and emergency room practice. Where possible, students participate in grand rounds, noon conferences and other clinically relevant didactic presentations. A set of cognitive objectives guides student reading in preparation for written examinations at the middle and end of the preceptorship. Prerequisites: admission to the physician assistant program and approval of the PA program director.