Final Assessment for Wisconsin Collaborative

ASSIGNMENT: You have been given the assignment of revising your school's U.S. history textbook. Based on our experience in the Teaching American History grant, provide chapter headings, rationale for each chapter and cite resources for each chapter. Also, include any essay questions you may assign at the end of each unit.

Instructor: Brent Larson, AP U.S. History, Central High School, La Crosse, WI

Textbook: Kennedy, Cohen, and Bailey: The American Pageant. Copyright 2002.

*Documents cited are from Our Documents, 100 Milestone, Documents From the National Archives

 

SEMESTER 1

Unit 1: Colonial History

  • Readings: The American Pageant, Chapters 1-6

  • Themes:

    1. The emergence of American cultural traits and the factors that contributed to them

    2. Emerging regional patterns and how they evolved

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. What's Important, and What's Not

    3. Shared Humanity

    4. Campaign Against Monocausality

    5. People Who Made a Difference

    6. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Various Colloquium Resources

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Write your definition of culture. Use your definition to compare the cultures of Native Americans and Europeans.

    2. Write your definition of progress. Use this definition to demonstrate that the discovery of America did or did not lead to progress in human history.

    3. Select any combination of two of the three colonial settlement areas (South, New England, Middle) and compare and contrast them. Focus on the motives of their founders, religious, and social orientation, economic pursuits and political development.

    4. Write your definition of mass hysteria. Then use this definition to argue that the Salem witchcraft episode was or was not a simple case of mass hysteria.

 

Unit 2: Independence

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 7-8

  • Themes:

    1. Colonists reevaluate their relationship with Great Britain and with each other

    2. The American Revolution as a conservative or a radical movement

    3. The American Revolution's place in world developments of the time period

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. Historical Empathy

    3. Change and Consequences

    4. Change and Continuity

    5. People Who Made a Difference

    6. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Declaration of Independence

    2. Treaty of Alliance with France

    3. "Common Sense" and "The Crisis"

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Write your definition of democracy. Then use this definition to argue that colonial politics had or had not become democratic by 1760.

    2. The French and Indian War has also been called the "Great War for Empire." Explain why this might be an appropriate name for this war.

    3. Create a scenario for the period 1763-1776to demonstrate that the American Revolutionary War and colonial independence from Great Britain were not inevitable.

    4. What does the phrase point of no return mean to you? Identify that point in colonial-British relations between 1760 and 1776, and explain why you picked that event/date.

 

Unit 3: Post-Independence and the Critical Period

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 9, 10

  • Themes:

    1. Impact of colonial experiences on post-independence government

    2. Development of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights

    3. The emergence of political parties and the factors that divided them

    4. The development of sectional specialization and interdependence

    5. The conflict between national power and states' rights

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. Historical Empathy

    3. Change and Consequence

    4. History is Unfinished Business

    5. People Who Made a Difference

    6. The Unintended and the Unexpected

    7. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Articles of Confederation

    2. Treaty of Paris

    3. Constitution of The United States

    4. Federalist Papers #10 and 51

  • Essay Questions:

    1. List three important battles of the Revolutionary War. Justify your selections

    2. It is often argued that the British "lost" the Revolutionary War more than the

    Americans "won" it. Do you agree or disagree? Why?

    3. Why didn't the leaders of the American Revolution extend their spirit of equality to the abolition of slavery and giving women the right to vote?

    4. Compare and contrast the Articles of confederation and the Constitution, especially in regard to the specific powers granted by each to the national government.

    5. Write your definition of democracy. Then use this definition to argue that Jefferson or Hamilton was the better spokesperson for democratic government in the 1790s.

 

Unit 4: Jefferson's Administration/Growth of Nationalism

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 11, 12

  • Themes:

    1. The peaceful transfer of power from one party to another

    2. Changes of party positions

    3. National growth and the growth of nationalism

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. What's Important, and What's Not

    3. Shared Humanity

    4. Change and Consequences

    5. Change and Continuity

    6. Campaign Against Monocausality

    7. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Northwest Ordinance

    2. Alien and Sedition Acts

    3. U. S. Patriot Act

    4. Selected Journal Entries form Lewis and Clark

    5. Marbury v. Madison

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Why do the text's authors refer to the case of Marbury v. Madison as "epochal"? Describe the short- and long-term ramifications of the decision.

    2. Assess the Jeffersonian presidency. What do you think were his three most important legacies?  Explain your choices.

    3. Which do you think was the most significant event of the decade following the Treaty of Ghent: panic of 1819,McCulloch v. Maryland, Florida Purchase Treaty, Missouri Compromise, Monroe Doctrine? Justify your selection.

    4. What might the president and Congress have done in 1812to avoid war with Britain and still maintain the nation's honor?

 

Unit 5: The Age of Jackson

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 13-15

  • Themes:

    1. The emergence of the second American party system

    2. The emergence of the "Common Man" in American politics

    3. Geographical and economic expansion

    4. Reform movements and the American character

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. Historical Empathy

    3. Shared Humanity

    4. People Who Made a Difference

    5. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Jackson's Indian Removal Message

    2. Primary Sources on Indians from Colloquium

    3. Dawes Act

  • Essay Questions:

    1. If you had been living in the age of Jackson, would you have been for or against the following: nullification, veto of the bank, and Indian removal? Justify your position.

    2. What do you find the single most worthwhile reform movement of the early nineteenth  century? Why?

    3. What would be your view on slavery if you were a typical

    • a. planter aristocrat

    • b. small slave owner

    • c. nonslaveowning white

    • d. mountain southerner

    • e. free black

 

Unit 6: Slavery and Sectionalism

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 16-19

  • Themes:

    1. Sectionalism

    2. Slavery and causes of the Civil War

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. Historical Empathy

    3. Shared Humanity

    4. Change and Consequences

    5. Campaign Against Monocausality

    6. People Who Made a Difference

    7. Time and Place are Inseparable

    8. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Missouri Compromise

    2. Dred Scott Decision

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Write your own definition of imperialism. Then use this definition to argue that the United States was or was not an imperialistic nation in the 1840s.

    2. The authors argue that the North "got the better of the Compromise of 1850." Doyou agree? Why or why not?

    3. What were the implications of the Dred Scott decision for

    • a. the status of free blacks in the United States?

    • b. the concept of popular sovereignty?

    • c. the future of slavery in America?

 

Unit 7: Civil War and Reconstruction

  • Readings: Text, chapters 20-22

  • Themes:

    1. Secession and war

    2. Reconstruction issues and plans

    3. The struggle for equality

    4. Native American relations

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. What's Important, and What's Not

    3. Historical Empathy

    4. Change and Continuity

    5. History's Tentative Nature

    6. People Who Made a Difference

    7. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Emancipation Proclamation

    2. Gettysburg Address

    3. 13th, 14th,and 15thAmendments to Constitution

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Do you think that President Lincoln was justified in his violations of ordinary civil liberties during the Civil War? Why or why not?

    2. When confronted with Southern secession in 1861,why didn't Lincoln simply allow the South to separate in peace?

    3. Explain the economic, military, and diplomatic results of the Union victory and Confederate defeat in the Civil War. What do you think was the main reason that the South lost? Explain your choice.

    4. Compare and contrast Lincoln's, Johnson's, and Congress's plans for Reconstruction. Cite what was included and what was omitted. Which program do you think was the best? Why?

 

Unit 8: Rise of Business and Labor

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 23,24

  • Themes:

    1. Political alignment and corruption in the Gilded Age

    2. Role of government in economic growth and regulation

    3. Social, economic, and political impact of industrialization

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Historical Empathy

    2. Shared Humanity

    3. People Who Made a Difference

    4. Evaluating Evidence

  • Essay Questions:

    1. How did government change as a result of the industrialization of America?

    2. What explains the rise of the Populist Party in the 1890s? Were the Populists reflecting only farmers' discontent, or did they express a deeper disaffection with the weaknesses of the two-party system?

    3. Why did labor unions find it difficult to organize industrial workers in the late nineteenth century?

 

 

SEMESTER 2

Unit 9: Populists and Progressives

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 25, 26, 29, and 30

  • Themes:

    1. Inflation/Deflation-Role of government in the economy

    2. Role and effectiveness of third parties

    3. Immigration and urbanization

    4. Patrician reformers

    5. Jeffersonian goals in Hamiltonian form

    6. Teddy Roosevelt/Taft/Wilson: Conservatives as Progressives (reform to preserve)

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. What's Important, and What's Not

    3. Historical Empathy

    4. History is Unfinished Business

    5. People Who Made a Difference

    6. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. 16thand 17thAmendments

    2. Excerpts from The Jungle

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Had you lived during this period, which political party-Democratic, Republican, or Populist would have attracted your allegiance?

    2. Most active progressives were middle-class Americans. Why was progressive reform more attractive to them than to other "interest groups" at the time?

 

Unit 10: Imperialism and World War I

  • Readings: Chapters 27, 28, and 31

  • Themes:

    1. The changing role of the U.S., in world affairs-from isolationism to world power

    2. U.S. motives in World War I and postwar agreements

    3. Presidential and congressional roles in policy management

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. Historical Empathy

    3. Change and Consequences

    4. History is Unfinished Business

    5. Campaign Against Monocausality

    6. People Who Made a Difference

    7. The Unintended and Unexpected8. Time and Place are Inseparable

    9. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Zimmermann Telegram

    2. Woodrow Wilson 14 Points

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Summarize the impact of American participation in World War I on

    • a. the national economy.

    • b. civil liberties.

    • c. public attitudes.

    2. Why did President Wilson finally decide that the United States needed to enter World War I? Do you agree that the United States should have entered the war? Why or why not? Do you think that Wilson took the nation to war for the right reasons? Explain.

    3. Summarize President Wilson's Fourteen Points. Which were substantially attained as a result of American participation in World War I? Which were not? Why?

 

Unit 11: 1920-1930s

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 32-35

  • Themes:

    1. The 1920s

    • a. Post-World War I, compared to post-Civil War nativism, laissez-faire, labor government, farmers, attitudes toward reform

    • b. U.S. pursuit of "advantages without responsibilities"

    • c. Administration policy of "nullification by administration"

    • d. Cultural conflicts: native v. foreign; rural v. urban

    • e. Revolution in manners and morals

    2. The 1930s

    • a. The role of government in society and the economy

    • b. Political realignment

    • c. Human suffering and response to the Great Depression

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. What's Important, and What's Not

    3. Shared Humanity

    4. Change and Continuity

    5. History is Unfinished Business

    6. Campaign Against Monocausality

    7. People Who Made a Difference

    8. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resource for the 1920s:

    1. 19thAmendment

  • Resources for the 1930s:

    1. Various Excerpts from Casting Her Own Shadow

    2. Social Security Act

    3. The Four Freedoms: FDR's Speech

    4. Colloquium Resources

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Would you like to have lived in the 1920s? Why or why not? Explain what you find most alluring about the decade and what you would not have liked.

    2. Outline the causes of the great crash of 1929.Why did it come so unexpectedly?

    3. Compare and contrast the first two years of the New Deal with the later New deal after 1934. Account for the differences.

 

Unit 12: World War II and the Origins of the Cold War

  • Readings: Chapters 36, and 37

  • Themes:

    1. Comparison of Wilson and Roosevelt as neutrals, wartime leaders, Allied partners, postwar planners

    2. U.S. adopts new role as peacetime leader in postwar world

    3. Home front conduct during World War I and World War II

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. Historical Empathy

    3. Shared Humanity

    4. Change and Consequences

    5. Change and Continuity

    6. History is Unfinished Business

    7. Campaign Against Monocausality

    8. People Who Made a Difference

    9. The Unintended and Unexpected

    10. Time and Place are Inseparable

    11. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Lend Lease Act

    2. FDR's Address: Declaration of War

    3. Executive Order 9066: Japanese Relocation

    4. Surrender of Japan

  • Essay Questions:

    1. At what point do you think American entry into the war in Europe became inevitable? Explain.

    2. In what ways did the United States emerge from World War II fundamentally changed? Consider national power, economic health, and the home front.

    3. Trace the origins of the Cold War, considering the historical background of United States-Soviet Union relations, the wartime relationship, and early postwar developments.

 

Unit 13: Postwar Domestic Issues

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 38 and 39

  • Themes:

    1. Continued impact of New Deal in government's role in society

    2. Struggle for civil liberties and civil rights

    3. Checks and balances at work in American politics

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. What's Important, and What's Not

    3. Change and Consequences

    4. Change and Continuity

    5. History is Unfinished Business

    6. History's Tentative Nature

    7. The Unintended and Unexpected

    8. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. UN Charter

    2. Marshall Plan

    3. Brown vs. Board of Education

    4. Order to desegregate Central High School

    5. Civil Rights Documents from Colloquium

  • Essay Questions:

    1. What do you think was the most important domestic issue or development of the 1950s? The most significant foreign-policy decision or event of the 1950s?Explain your choices.

    2. Based on Varying Viewpoints, who do you believe was responsible for the Cold War?

 

Unit 14: Foreign Policy-Eisenhower-Reagan

  • Readings: Text, Chapters 40-42

  • Themes:

    1. Cycles of freezes and thaws in East-West relations

    2. The "Vietnam Syndrome" in postwar foreign policy

    3. Human rights v. strategic self-interest in policy formulation

    4. Interrelationship of foreign policy and economic stability

  • Habits of the Mind Emphasis:

    1. Significance of the Past

    2. Change and Consequences

    3. Change and Continuity

    4. History is Unfinished Business

    5. Campaign Against Monocausality

    6. People Who Made a Difference

    7. The Unintended and Unexpected

    8. Time and Place are Inseparable

    9. Evaluating Evidence

  • Resources:

    1. Aerial Photos of Missiles in Cuba

    2. Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

    3. My Lai Trial Transcripts

  • Essay Questions:

    1. Explain why the civil rights movement became more radical and violent as the 1960s progressed. What changes occurred in the motives, assumptions, and leadership of the movement?

    2. Do you think that President Kennedy promised more as a candidate than he delivered as president? Focus on his domestic reform proposals and be specific. What did he promise, and what did he accomplish?

    3. Assess President Nixon's strategy of "Vietnamization." Do you think that it was the best way to end the war? Why or why not?

    4. Was Gerald Ford's pardon of Nixon justified? Why or why not?

    5. What do you think have been the three most important world events since 1980? Assess America's public reaction and presidential leadership in relation to these events.

 

Unit 15: Post-Exam Work

 

 

Revised 08/25/2008  

 

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