Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning (CATL)

Expand page menu
Skip to page menu

Attention and Learning

As teachers we may view attention as one of the basic precursors for learning. Students won’t learn unless they pay attention. What can we do to enhance this basic process and enhance student learning?

Effective Learning Techniques

By the time students reach college we expect them to be able to regulate their own learning. A basic aspect of self-regulated learning is being able to use specific learning techniques to acquire, understand and remember new material. In this presentation we examine recent research that evaluates the utility of 10 common learning techniques, and speculate on why some techniques work well while others do not.

Exploring How Students Learn

This is a collection of resources related to college student learning. This resources here highlight research findings and theoretical perspectives about learning that have direct implications for improving college teaching.

Online Readiness Tutorial

This self-paced tutorial is designed to help students taking online courses succeed in a virtual learning environment. 

Metacognition in Practice

Metacognition is thinking about one’s thinking. In this article Tanner (2012) offers activities she uses in her biology class that could be easily adapted for other subject-areas. Tanner (2012) asserts that metacognitvie instruction should also be embedded with the content and activities about which students are thinking.  Why?  Metacognition is “not generic” (Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, p. 19) but instead is most effective when it is adapted to reflect the specific learning contexts of a specific topic, course, or discipline (Zohar & David, 2009).

Reducing Stereotype Threat at UWL

This address uses the psychologist’s toolbox to understand why certain schools and workplaces cause students to underperform relative to their potential and what interventions combat underperformance. 

Reducing Test Anxiety

This 3-minute video explains how student test anxiety interferes with students' performance and how an expressive writing strategy can reduce the negative effects of test anxiety.