Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning (CATL)

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Fall 2017

Discussion Design Alternatives
Marjorie Bazluki, Instructional Designer
2:30-3:30 p.m., Thursday, September 28, in 153 Murphy Library

Online asynchronous discussions are critical for promoting learning and often incorporated into blended and online courses, providing opportunities for rich dialogue among students outside of the traditional face-to-face classroom environment.  This session explores ways to promote engaging and interactive online discussion.

​As a collaborative working session, you're encouraged to bring existing discussion questions or discussion ideas that may be developed or revised. Examples of good discussion questions turned great discussion questions will be shared.


Designing Writing Assignments (Writing-Intensive Instructor Series)
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, September 29, in 153 Murphy Library

Writing assignments can be challenging to integrate into courses given the time constraints faced by students and instructors alike. This session is an opportunity for instructors to reflect on how they use writing in one of their classes and overcome potential challenges. Prior to this session, you will be given access to a collection of sample writing assignments and design strategies. During the session, we will discuss ways to select, sequence, and streamline formal and informal writing assignments in out courses.  This session is recommended for faculty and staff across the disciplines, including Writing  Emphasis/Writing-in-the-Major instructors.


Giving Feedback on Student Writing (Writing-Intensive Instructor Series)
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, October 6, in 153 Murphy Library

Many instructors report that giving feedback on writing is one of the most time-intensive aspects of their job. How can feedback be delivered more efficiently, increasing the chances students will actually use it? After a quick review of instructor and peer feedback strategies, this session will spotlight techniques that can significantly reduce the time it takes to respond to student work and improve student learning. Those who register for this session will be given access to a collection of feedback strategies and practical tips for integrating them into your courses. During the session, instructors will develop a plan for generating and delivering feedback on writing assignments. This session is recommended for faculty and staff across the disciplines, including Writing Emphasis/Writing-in-the-Major instructors.


Helping Students Be Successful in Your Online Course
Brian Udermann, Director of Online Education
2:30-3:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 10, in 153 Murphy Library

There are a variety of strategies instructors can utilize to help their online students be successful. These strategies can range from how a course is designed to using effective communication and facilitation practices when teaching online. This workshop will focus on providing practical tips and suggestions instructors can use to help their online students succeed.


Assessing Student Writing (Writing-Intensive Instructor Series)
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, October 13, in 153 Murphy Library

What does success look like in student writing?  Regardless of our definition of success, it can be challenging to communicate expectations to students and manage the grading workload associated with writing assignments. This session will focus on ways to articulate assignment goals, write evaluation criteria, and develop a grading scheme. After registering, participants will receive a link to a collection of teaching resources dedicated to writing assessment, including several examples of writing rubrics and scoring guides. Participants are invited to bring copies of writing assignments and/or rubrics they would like to review during the hands-on portion. This session is recommended for faculty and staff across the disciplines, including Writing Emphasis/Writing-in-the-Major instructors.


Instructor Mindset (Inclusive Teaching Series)
Deb Hoskins, CATL Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, October 20, in 153 Murphy Library

Many instructors – perhaps even most – believe that all students can succeed.  How do we demonstrate our belief in students?  Are there times or circumstances when we don't?  If there are such times and circumstances, what do we do, and what could we do differently?

UWL's Strategic Plan commits us to trying to convince students that learning is possible, even those who've absorbed the idea that they "just aren't good" at some important skill.  That message means most to students when it's obvious that their instructor believes it, and believes it about every student in the room. In this session, we will examine research on highly successful single-population institutions indicating that student success requires high belief, along with high challenge and high support. We will then consider how and where we can apply their assumption of high belief to out own practices, beginning with our syllabi. Instructors should bring a copy of a course syllabus with them to this session.

Each session in the Inclusive Teaching series will return to this issue in some form.


High Support and Students Who Struggle (Inclusive Teaching Series)
Deb Hoskins, CATL Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, October 27, in 153 Murphy Library

If any student can learn, how do we respond when a student struggles?  Do we really believe that one learns more from failure than success?  If we do, how do students who struggle experience our belief? How do extenuating circumstances — the size of the class, the proportion who struggle, the centrality of the learning goals, the level of the course — affect our response?  Can we design high support into the course?  When, and how?  How transparent are we with students about how we should respond?  Do we simply refer struggling students elsewhere?  When should we refer?  How?  Are there other ways we could support students who struggle that we have not considered?

In this session, you'll develop a flowchart for a particular course to help think through decisions when working with a student who is struggling.


Level of Challenge (Inclusive Teaching Series)
Deb Hoskins, CATL Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, November 3, in 153 Murphy Library

We know from research on specific-population institutions that high challenge, combined with high belief and high support, is key to student success. There's an inherent conflict in this idea for instructors: if everyone succeeds, is it because we set the bar too low?  And yet, don't we want everyone to succeed?  Does a high rate of Ds, Fs, and Ws indicate quality? And if we tell students that, what messages might students from historically underserved populations hear in that statistic?

Documenting how you determine the level of challenge in a course, and the processes you engage to help students reach those high goals, are important contributions to the teaching evidence in your promotion and retention materials.  In this session, instructors will chart each of those processes as we consider a variety of options for each.

CATL Workshop Archives

Recent Workshops and Working Sessions (Fall 2017)

September 2017

  • Consolidate and Deepen Students' Knowledge after Lecture (Sep 21)
  • Infographics as Visual Learning Tools (Sep 15)
  • Strategies that Promote Deeper Learning during Lecture (Sep 14)
  • Helping Students be Successful in Your Online Course (Sep 8)
  • Strategies to Develop Students' Prior Knowledge before Lecture (Sep 7)

August 2017

  • CATL Kickstart Working Session (Aug 24)
  • Improving Assignments through Peer Review (Aug 17 - 24)
  • Online Course Development Working Session (Aug 21)

Past Workshops (Fall 2010-Spring 2017)