Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning (CATL)

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Fall 2017

Online Course Development Working Session
Facilitators: Brian Udermann, Director of Online Education; Marjorie Bazluki & Khendum Gyabak, Instructional Designers
9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Monday, August 21, 150/153 Murphy Library 

This working session is intended for instructors who are developing a new online course, and instructors who want to revise an online course they have already developed and taught. Brian, Marjorie and Khendum will be on hand to answer questions, and give feedback and suggestions about your courses. Assistance will be provided for instructors who might be looking for help to: develop student learning objectives that are measureable and clearly stated; demonstrate alignment between learning objectives, course activities, and assessments; design and develop engaging course content; use online discussions more effectively; develop appropriate assessments; develop ways to provide better feedback for online learners; manage the workload associated with teaching online; use technology and media more effectively; improve online teaching facilitation skills; make sure online course material is accessible to all learners; create an online course that is more visually appealing.

You can attend for the entire day to work on online course revisions, or drop in at your convenience to get specific help throughout the day.


Improving Assignments through Peer Review
Facilitators: Betsy Knowles & Laurie Miller, Economics; Bill Cerbin, Deb Hoskins, & Bryan Kopp, CATL
9:00 - 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, August 22 & Thursday August 24, 153 Murphy

Assignments are powerful teaching tools, and their design is one of the most consequential intellectual tasks that faculty undertake in their work as educators. In some ways they are always a work in progress. We plan an assignment and based on student performance, we realize how it falls short of our goals. We think of ways to make it more effective, we revise it, and try it again. 

To assist instructors in the development of effective assignments, the Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning will facilitate an opportunity for instructors to revise and improve an important class assignment. As a participant, you will share ideas with colleagues, give and receive feedback, and do a substantive revision of a class assignment.

You will work with a small peer review group of 3-4 instructors. After reading your group members’ assignments, you will meet to discuss and give feedback on one another’s assignments, and then use the feedback to revise your own assignment. The process is modeled after the efforts of the National Institute of Learning Outcomes Assessment in the area of assignment design.

The benefits of participating in this workshop include:

  •      Improving your assignment
  •      Practice using assignment design principles
  •      Having your assignment peer reviewed
  •      Being a peer reviewer
  •      The opportunity to see assignments from other disciplines
  •      Creating evidence of teaching efffectiveness

Registration deadline is noon, August 15.  To register, select a class assignment you want to revise. Complete the COVER PAGE, and submit both the cover page and your assignment to Bill Cerbin, wcerbin@uwlax.edu. Enrollment is limited to 20 participants. You will receive additional information after registering.

Date

Activity

Preparation
August 17-21

Read your group members' assignments and make notes to bring to the meeting.

Peer Review Meeting
August 22
9:00 - 11:00
153 Murphy

Give and receive oral and written feedback on one another's assignments.

Assignment Revision
August 22-24

After receiving feedback, revise your assignment and prepare to bring to the final peer review meeting.

Peer Review Meeting
August 24
9:00 - 11:00
153 Murphy

Discuss and critique revised assignments.

 


CATL Kickstart Working Session
8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Thursday, August
24, 150 Murphy

CATL is offering a daylong work session at which you can prepare a syllabus, plan your course, put the finishing touches on a course preparation, design a new assignment, discuss teaching issues with consultants, or simply explore alternative teaching practices. CATL staff members will be available to discuss any topics and questions with you, and provide feedback on your revisions. This combination of dedicated work-time, resources, feedback, and on-demand consultation may help you feel better prepared for the coming semester. 

You can attend for the entire day to work on preparing your teaching content, or drop in at your convenience to get specific help throughout the day.


Strategies to Develop Students' Prior Knowledge Before Lecture (Science of Learning Series)
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
2:30-3:30 p.m., Thursday, September 7, 153 Murphy

Prior knowledge (PK) consists of students' factual information, skills, and beliefs about a subject and is critical for learning more about the subject. Students exhibit four distinct prior knowledge problems that impede learning from lecture (Ambrose et. al, 2010):

  1. Insufficient PK. They know little about the new topic at hand.
  2. Inappropriate PK. They draw upon irrelevant PK in learning the topic.
  3. Inaccurate PK.  They have misconceptions or erroneous preconceptions about the topic.
  4. Inert PK. They have relevant prior knowledge but do not use it to learn the topic

In this session, you will explore strategies to develop students' prior knowledge relevant to your lectures.


Helping Students Be Successful in Your Online Course
Brian Udermann, Director of Online Education
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, September 8, in 153 Murphy Library

There are a variety of strategies instructors can utilize to help their online students be successful. These strategies can range from how a course is designed to using effective communication and facilitation practices when teaching online. This workshop will focus on providing practical tips and suggestions instructors can use to help their online students succeed.


Strategies that Promote Deeper Learning during Lecture (Science of Learning Series)
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
2:30-3:30 p.m., Thursday, September 14, in 153 Murphy Library

Researchers distinguish between shallow and deep processing in learning (Chi & Wylie, 2014). Shallow processing involves trying to remember material through rote memorization, repetition, re-reading, and highlighting. These activities re-expose students to the material but often result in superficial learning (Chi, 2009). Deep(er) learning involves trying to make sense of the material by connecting new information to what you already know looking for patterns, themes, organizing principles exploring the implications or consequences of the subject matter ​Deep processing activities lead to better understanding and more durable learning (Chi & Wylie, 2014). For example, when students try to explain a new concept they discern new connections among ideas, and identify what they still do not understand very well.

​In this session you will identify deeper learning strategies that best fit your subject matter, and explore how to incorporate them into your lectures, discussions, and class activities.


Infographics as Visual Learning Tools
Khendum Gyabak, Instructional Designer
1:30-3:00 p.m., Friday, September 15, in 153 Murphy Library

Infographics have become a popular way to communicate pertinent information. Recent studies on visualization and memorability suggest that infographics can be viewed as an effective learning tool (Borkin et al, 2015). This hands-on work will walk you through identifying key design elements for creating and using infographics.

​As a working session, participants are asked to bring their laptop and a topic/concept in your subject-area that you want to design as an infographic.


Consolidate and Deepen Students' Knowledge after Lecture (Science of Learning Series)
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
2:30-3:30 p.m., Thursday, September 21, in 153 Murphy Library

​The first exposure to the lecture material in class is unlikely to produce durable knowledge (Nuthall, 2007). Unless students ​do something more ​with the newly acquired information, they may not achieve much depth of understanding, and are likely to forget most of the material quickly. What should students do after lecture to elaborate, consolidate and remember what they have been learning?  What can teachers do to support students' post-lecture learning?

​In this session you will explore learning strategies that make learning last, and how you can incorporate these into your courses.


Discussion Design Alternatives
Marjorie Bazluki, Instructional Designer
2:30-3:30 p.m., Thursday, September 28, in 153 Murphy Library

Online asynchronous discussions are critical for promoting learning and often incorporated into blended and online courses, providing opportunities for rich dialogue among students outside of the traditional face-to-face classroom environment.  This session explores ways to promote engaging and interactive online discussion.

​As a collaborative working session, you're encouraged to bring existing discussion questions or discussion ideas that may be developed or revised. Examples of good discussion questions turned great discussion questions will be shared.


Designing Writing Assignments (Writing-Intensive Instructor Series)
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, September 29, in 153 Murphy Library

Writing assignments can be challenging to integrate into courses given the time constraints faced by students and instructors alike. This session is an opportunity for instructors to reflect on how they use writing in one of their classes and overcome potential challenges. Prior to this session, you will be given access to a collection of sample writing assignments and design strategies. During the session, we will discuss ways to select, sequence, and streamline formal and informal writing assignments in out courses.  This session is recommended for faculty and staff across the disciplines, including Writing  Emphasis/Writing-in-the-Major instructors.


Giving Feedback on Student Writing (Writing-Intensive Instructor Series)
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, October 6, in 153 Murphy Library

Many instructors report that giving feedback on writing is one of the most time-intensive aspects of their job. How can feedback be delivered more efficiently, increasing the chances students will actually use it? After a quick review of instructor and peer feedback strategies, this session will spotlight techniques that can significantly reduce the time it takes to respond to student work and improve student learning. Those who register for this session will be given access to a collection of feedback strategies and practical tips for integrating them into your courses. During the session, instructors will develop a plan for generating and delivering feedback on writing assignments. This session is recommended for faculty and staff across the disciplines, including Writing Emphasis/Writing-in-the-Major instructors.


Helping Students Be Successful in Your Online Course
Brian Udermann, Director of Online Education
2:30-3:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 10, in 153 Murphy Library

There are a variety of strategies instructors can utilize to help their online students be successful. These strategies can range from how a course is designed to using effective communication and facilitation practices when teaching online. This workshop will focus on providing practical tips and suggestions instructors can use to help their online students succeed.


Assessing Student Writing (Writing-Intensive Instructor Series)
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, October 13, in 153 Murphy Library

What does success look like in student writing?  Regardless of our definition of success, it can be challenging to communicate expectations to students and manage the grading workload associated with writing assignments. This session will focus on ways to articulate assignment goals, write evaluation criteria, and develop a grading scheme. After registering, participants will receive a link to a collection of teaching resources dedicated to writing assessment, including several examples of writing rubrics and scoring guides. Participants are invited to bring copies of writing assignments and/or rubrics they would like to review during the hands-on portion. This session is recommended for faculty and staff across the disciplines, including Writing Emphasis/Writing-in-the-Major instructors.


Instructor Mindset (Inclusive Teaching Series)
Deb Hoskins, CATL Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, October 20, in 153 Murphy Library

Many instructors – perhaps even most – believe that all students can succeed.  How do we demonstrate our belief in students?  Are there times or circumstances when we don't?  If there are such times and circumstances, what do we do, and what could we do differently?

UWL's Strategic Plan commits us to trying to convince students that learning is possible, even those who've absorbed the idea that they "just aren't good" at some important skill.  That message means most to students when it's obvious that their instructor believes it, and believes it about every student in the room. In this session, we will examine research on highly successful single-population institutions indicating that student success requires high belief, along with high challenge and high support. We will then consider how and where we can apply their assumption of high belief to our own practices, beginning with our syllabi. Instructors should bring a copy of a course syllabus with them to this session.

Each session in the Inclusive Teaching series will return to this issue in some form.


High Support and Students Who Struggle (Inclusive Teaching Series)
Deb Hoskins, CATL Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, October 27, in 153 Murphy Library

If any student can learn, how do we respond when a student struggles?  Do we really believe that one learns more from failure than success?  If we do, how do students who struggle experience our belief? How do extenuating circumstances — the size of the class, the proportion who struggle, the centrality of the learning goals, the level of the course — affect our response?  Can we design high support into the course?  When, and how?  How transparent are we with students about how we should respond?  Do we simply refer struggling students elsewhere?  When should we refer?  How?  Are there other ways we could support students who struggle that we have not considered?

In this session, you'll develop a flowchart for a particular course to help think through decisions when working with a student who is struggling.


Level of Challenge (Inclusive Teaching Series)
Deb Hoskins, CATL Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
1:30-2:30 p.m., Friday, November 3, in 153 Murphy Library

We know from research on specific-population institutions that high challenge, combined with high belief and high support, is key to student success. There's an inherent conflict in this idea for instructors: if everyone succeeds, is it because we set the bar too low?  And yet, don't we want everyone to succeed?  Does a high rate of Ds, Fs, and Ws indicate quality? And if we tell students that, what messages might students from historically underserved populations hear in that statistic?

Documenting how you determine the level of challenge in a course, and the processes you engage to help students reach those high goals, are important contributions to the teaching evidence in your promotion and retention materials.  In this session, instructors will chart each of those processes as we consider a variety of options for each.