Spring 2019

Equity Gaps in Higher Education: A Framework for Solutions
Deb Hoskins, Inclusive Excellence Coordinator, CATL
Barbara Stewart, Vice Chancellor for Diversity & Inclusion
Tuesday, January 29, 12:40 – 4:00 p.m., 150 Murphy Library

What are “equity gaps”? How do we know they exist? Aren’t we inheriting these gaps from K-12? Can we fix this problem before K-12 fixes it? Beginning with definitions and evidence, this workshop will examine a framework to help us strategize evidence-based approaches that have been shown to narrow equity gaps grounded in race in higher education, including the mental shifts instructors must make to develop consistency in our approach to this problem.


How to Improve Your Objective Tests
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
Friday, February 1, 8:45 - 9:45 a.m., repeated 2:15 – 3:15 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

This session focuses on how to improve your objective tests (multiple choice) by:

  1. using guidelines for writing “good” test items
  2. writing items aligned with your learning objectives
  3. using a test plan to ensure your tests are fair and represent what students were supposed to learn.

Bring one of your multiple-choice tests to use as a “test-case” to analyze and annotate possible changes.


Getting Started Teaching Online
Brian Udermann, Director of Online Learning
Wednesday, February 6, 8:50 – 9:45 a.m., repeated 2:15 – 3:10 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

Deciding to develop and teach an online course for the first time can be a difficult decision with many factors to consider. This workshop is geared towards instructors who are contemplating teaching online or who have limited online teaching experience. Topics covered will include course design & organization, engaging online learners, instructor presence, facilitating effective online discussions and
workload management.


Equity Gaps in Higher Education: Practicing High Belief
Deb Hoskins, Inclusive Excellence Coordinator, CATL
Barbara Stewart, Vice Chancellor for Diversity & Inclusion
Thursday, February 7, 3:45 - 5:00 p.m., 150 Murphy Library

Many instructors – perhaps even most – believe that all students can succeed. How do we demonstrate our belief in students? Are there times or circumstances when we don't? If there are such times or circumstances, what could we do differently?

UWL's Strategic Plan commits us to trying to convince students that learning is possible, even those who've absorbed the idea that they "just aren't good" at some important skill. That message means most to students when it's obvious that their instructor believes it, and believes it about every student in the room. In this session, we will examine research on highly successful single-population institutions indicating that student success requires high belief, along with high challenge and high support. We will then consider how and where we can apply their assumption of high belief to our own practices, beginning with our syllabi. Instructors should bring a copy of a course syllabus with them to this session.


How to Use Testing to Improve Student Learning
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
Thursday, February 14, 8:00 – 9:00 a.m., repeated 2:15 – 3:15 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

One hundred years of research has shown that testing oneself or being tested is a powerful way to learn. This session identifies how instructors can use tests, quizzes, clicker questions, questions embedded in readings, and other techniques to promote student learning. We will explore testing strategies to use before, during and after your class that boost learning, involve little grading, and support students’ motivation for learning.


How to Be an Ally to Students
Deb Hoskins, Inclusive Excellence Coordinator, CATL
Amanda Goodenough, Director, Campus
Climate
Wednesday, February 20, 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., 150 Murphy Library

UWL has long had a reputation for caring and support both of students and of colleagues. Yet our retention rates for students of color and our students’ film “Inclusive Negligence” suggest that we can do better. In this workshop, we will identify and practice some basic skills that will help you support the retention and success of your students.


Equity Gaps in Higher Education: Providing Effective Support
Deb Hoskins, Inclusive Excellence Coordinator, CATL
Barbara Stewart, Vice Chancellor for Diversity & Inclusion
Monday, March 4, 3:45 – 5:00 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

If any student can learn, how do we respond when students struggle? How do extenuating circumstances – the size of the class, the proportion who struggle, the centrality of the learning goals, the level of the course – affect our responses? Can we design high support into our course? Are there ways we could support students who struggle that we have not considered?

In this session, instructors will consider several research-based strategies for providing student support.


High-Impact Writing Practices
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
Thursday March 7, 7:45 - 8:45 a.m., repeated 3:55 - 4:55 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

<Description forthcoming>


Fact-checking in the (Mis)Information Age:
Seven Strategies to Support Critical Thinking in Our Classes

Khendum Gyabak, CATL Instructional Designer
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
Thursday, March 28, 2:15 – 3:15 p.m., 150 Murphy Library

It is increasingly difficult to determine what is true and false online. Conventional methods of evaluating the veracity of online content are limited and may be obsolete (Wineburg et al., 2016). False information may shape — or distort — our students’ prior knowledge and influence how they learn in our classes. Many instructors incorporate online resources into their teaching and students commonly use Internet research when completing assignments, but to what extent can students evaluate the information they are using? Fact-checking is a fundamental 21st century critical thinking skill and instructors increasingly need to model how to critically evaluate online content. This session will highlight seven strategies used by professional fact-checkers that can be adapted for classroom use. Participants will be given tools and resources for evaluating online content that can be tailored to their subject areas and delivered in both face-to-face and online classes. 

Fall 2018

CATL Kickstart Work Session 
Friday, August 24, 8:30 – 4:00 p.m.,
150 Murphy Library

The Kickstart is a work session at which you can prepare a syllabus, plan your course, put the finishing touches on a course preparation, design a new assignment, discuss teaching issues with consultants, or simply explore alternative teaching practices. Attend as long as your schedule permits. CATL staff members will be available to discuss any topics and questions with you, and provide feedback on your revisions. This combination of dedicated work-time, resources, feedback and on-demand consultation may help you feel better prepared for the coming semester. Refreshments will be available throughout the day, with a lunch option available for those who register by Tuesday, August 21st.


Strategies to Develop Students’ Prior Knowledge before Lecture (Learning from Lecture Series)
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
Thursday, September 6, 8:00 – 9:00 a.m., repeated 2:30 – 3:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

Prior knowledge consists of students’ factual information, skills and beliefs about a subject, and is critical for learning more about the subject. Students exhibit four distinct prior knowledge problems that impede new learning (Ambrose et. al, 2010):

  1. Insufficient PK. They know little about the new topic at hand.
  2. Inaccurate PK. They have misconceptions or erroneous beliefs about a new topic.
  3. Inappropriate PK. They draw upon irrelevant prior knowledge in learning a new topic.
  4. Inert PK. They have relevant prior knowledge but do not use it to learn a new topic.

In this session, we will examine prior knowledge strategies, such as a prior knowledge tests, prior knowledge assignments, and in-class exercises to activate students’ prior knowledge. You will outline a plan to use strategies that best fit your learning goals and class. 


Strategies to Reduce Unnecessary Cognitive Load during Lecture (Learning from Lecture Series)
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
Thursday, September 13, 8:00 – 9:00 a.m., repeated 2:30 – 3:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

Students are often presented with large amounts of new information that exceed their processing capacity, resulting in cognitive overload and poor learning (Mayer, 2011). As one group of researchers argues:

      By far the most common problem is that lectures contain too much   
      information. One count has it that an average engineering lecture introduces
      a new equation every 2.5 minutes and a new variable every 45 seconds
      (Blikstein & Wilensky, 2010). Imagine sitting through that for an hour!  

                       Schwartz, Tsang, & Blair, 2016, The ABCs of How We Learn, p. 124  

Too much information is not the only source of overload. Distractions, disorganized instruction, and even an instructor’s anecdotes can create unnecessary cognitive load that makes it harder for students to learn.

In this session, you will use a cognitive load checklist to identify types of unnecessary cognitive load in your lectures, and plan ways to reduce or manage unnecessary cognitive load in your class, e.g., modify lecture organization, slides and visuals, classroom distractions, and pace of delivery. 


Strategies to Promote Deeper Learning during Lecture (Learning from Lecture Series)
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
Thursday, September 20, 8:00 – 9:00 a.m., repeated 2:30 – 3:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

Researchers distinguish between shallow and deep processing in learning. Shallow processing involves trying to learn material through rote memorization, repetition, rereading, and highlighting. These activities re-expose students to the material but often result in superficial learning (Chi, 2009). Deeper learning involves trying to make sense of the material by:

  • connecting new information to what you already know
  • looking for patterns, themes, organizing principles
  • exploring the implications or consequences of the new information 

Deep processing activities lead to better understanding and more durable learning (Chi & Wylie, 2014). For example, when students try to explain a new concept they make new connections among ideas, infer missing information, and identify what they still do not understand very well. In this case, students don’t remember an explanation they already learned, they learn the material by explaining it.

In this session, you will outline a plan to implement deep learning strategies in your lectures. From a menu of strategies, you can select or modify any that fit your content area, learning goals and teaching preferences.


Fact-checking in the (Mis)Information Age: Seven Strategies to Support Critical Thinking in Our Classes
Khendum Gyabak, CATL Instructional Designer
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
Friday, September 21, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

It is increasingly difficult to determine what is true and false online. Conventional methods of evaluating the veracity of online content are limited and may be obsolete (Wineburg et al., 2016). False information may shape — or distort — our students’ prior knowledge and influence how they learn in our classes. Many instructors incorporate online resources into their teaching and students commonly use Internet research when completing assignments, but to what extent can students evaluate the information they are using? Fact-checking is a fundamental 21st century critical thinking skill and instructors increasingly need to model how to critically evaluate online content. This session will highlight seven strategies used by professional fact-checkers that can be adapted for classroom use. Participants will be given tools and resources for evaluating online content that can be tailored to their subject areas and delivered in both face-to-face and online classes. 


Classroom Discussions, Free Speech, and UW-System Policy 
Nizam Arain, Director of Equality and Affirmative Action
Tuesday, September 25, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m., 150 Murphy Library

Last year, the Board of Regents for UW System revisited its Commitment to Academic Freedom and Free Speech. What does this policy mean for classroom instructors? What classroom policies should instructors put into place? Please read the policy here, and join Nizam Arain for an investigation of the issues.


Strategies to Consolidate and Deepen Students’ Knowledge after Lecture
(Learning from Lecture Series)
Bill Cerbin, CATL Director
Thursday, September 27, 8:00 – 9:00 a.m., repeated 2:30 – 3:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

A single exposure to lecture material in class is unlikely to produce durable knowledge. Students may leave class with only a tenuous understanding of the material. In fact, research shows that students’ notes typically contain fewer than half of the main ideas from lecture (King, 1992; Kierwa, 2002). Unless students continue to think about the material after lecture they won’t achieve much depth of understanding, and are likely to forget most of it.

In this session, we will identify strategies that help students elaborate and consolidate what they started to learn in lecture. You will outline a plan to use activities during the last few minutes of class time and after class, e.g., minute papers, elaborating class notes, online quizzes, and application problems.  


Strategies to Utilize High-Impact Practices in Online Courses
Brian Udermann, Online Education Director
Marjorie Bazluki and Khendum Gyabak, CATL Instructional Designers
Friday, September 28, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

As the number of online courses and degree programs continues to grow, faculty are increasingly utilizing high-impact practices (common intellectual experiences, writing, collaborative assignments, ePortfolios, service learning, etc.) in online course offerings. This workshop will explore how high-impact practices are being used in online courses across a variety of programs and disciplines.


Accessible Instructional Design is Good Instructional Design
Marjorie Bazluki, CATL Instructional Designer
Friday, October 5, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library 

Advancements in educational technology, coupled with the increasing number of students with disabilities, require instructors to design more accessible online courses. This workshop is an opportunity to learn a wide variety of basic concepts related to access challenges in online courses that benefit not only students with a disability but all students with a special look at the accessibility feature in Canvas.


Developing a Proposal for a Short-term Faculty-led Education Abroad Program
Emelee Volden, Director, International Education and Engagement
Wednesday, October 10, Noon 1:00 p.m., 153 Murphy Library
(this session will be repeated Friday, October 26, 3:00 4:00 p.m.)

The goal of this information session is to provide participants with the information needed to complete a successful proposal for a new education abroad program. Participants have an opportunity to network with faculty and staff members familiar with running faculty-led study abroad programs.  Discussion topics include:

  • Program director responsibilities
  • Program location and timing
  • Curriculum
  • Health, safety and security
  • Fiscal issues and administrative matters
  • Required paperwork and proposal process

From Bad Grammar to Good Writing
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
Virginia Crank, Sara Heaser, Stephen Mann, and Darci Thoune, Department of English

Friday, October 12, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

According to a new report by the Primary Research Group, most college students think they do not need any grammar instruction. Are they right? Instructors across the disciplines lament the grammar, usage, spelling, punctuation, and mechanics issues they see in student writing. While some teachers prioritize grammar in their grading, others pay no attention to misplaced commas, confused words, awkward phrasing, etc. How should correctness issues and the use of conventions be handled in writing assignments? This session will share research-based perspectives from campus writing specialists and highlight strategies instructors can incorporate into their classes.


Managing the Workload of Writing Assignments
Bryan Kopp, CATL Writing Programs Coordinator
Friday, October 19, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

Many instructors report that responding to student writing is one of the most time-intensive aspects of their job. After a quick review of instructor and peer feedback strategies, this session will spotlight techniques that can significantly reduce the time it takes to respond to student work and can improve student learning. The hands-on portion of the session will focus on creating a feedback system and an assessment plan that aligns with your assignment goals. Participants are asked to bring a computer and a writing assignment they wish to develop or refine. All instructors who are interested in or who are already incorporating writing into their classes are invited to attend, especially instructors teaching Writing Emphasis courses or within approved Writing-in-the-Major programs.


Developing a Proposal for a Short-term Faculty-led Education Abroad Program
Emelee Volden, Director, International Education and Engagement
Friday, October 26, 3:00 4:00 p.m., 153 Murphy Library
(Repeat of October 10 session)

The goal of this information session is to provide participants with the information needed to complete a successful proposal for a new education abroad program. Participants have an opportunity to network with faculty and staff members familiar with running faculty-led study abroad programs.  Discussion topics include:

  • Program director responsibilities
  • Program location and timing
  • Curriculum
  • Health, safety and security
  • Fiscal issues and administrative matters
  • Required paperwork and proposal process

How to Be an Ally
Deb Hoskins, CATL Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
Amanda Goodenough, Director of Campus Climate
Friday, November 2, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., 150 Murphy Library

UWL has long had a reputation for caring and support both of students and of colleagues. Yet our retention rates for colleagues and students of color, and our students’ film “Inclusive Negligence,” suggest that we can do better. In this workshop, we will identify and practice some basic skills that will help you support the retention and success of your colleagues and students.


Equity Gaps in Higher Education
Deb Hoskins, CATL Inclusive Excellence Coordinator
Barbara Stewart, Vice Chancellor, Diversity and Inclusion
Friday, November 9, 1:30 – 2:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

What are “equity gaps”? How do we know they exist? Aren’t we inheriting these gaps from K-12? Can we fix this problem before K-12 fixes it? Beginning with definitions and evidence, this workshop will examine several evidence-based approaches that have been shown to narrow equity gaps grounded in race in higher education, and the mental shifts instructors must make to develop consistency in our approach to these problems.


Introduction to Canvas
Khendum Gyabak, CATL Instructional Designer
Monday, November 21, 2:15 - 4:15 p.m., 102 Wing Technology Center

This session introduces users to navigation, course tools, and communicating with students.


Copyright: The Good, The Bad, and The Legal 
Scott Pfitzinger, Access Services Librarian
Thursday, November 29, 2:15 - 3:15 p.m., 150 Murphy Library

University faculty have a unique and sometimes confusing position when it comes what is allowed and not allowed in copyright law. We will discuss copyright law as applied to print and media materials in classroom use, library reserves, and online courses. It may not be what you think! (The facilitator is NOT a lawyer and does not even play one in western movies.)


Grading in Canvas
Khendum Gyabak, CATL Instructional Designer
Thursday, December 6th, 2018, 2:15-3:15 p.m., 102 Wing Technology Center

This session covers the assignment, quiz, and grading features on Canvas.
(No registration required)


Helping Students Learn Collaboratively: An Assignment Feedback and Revision Workshop
Lindsay Steiner, English & Bryan Kopp, English/CATL
Friday, December 7, 1:30 - 2:30 p.m., 153 Murphy Library

Collaborative assignments are considered a high-impact learning practice because students learn to solve problems in teams and engage with diverse perspectives. Assigning group projects can help students develop project management and interpersonal skills. However, students often encounter pitfalls when trying to do group work, including unequal commitment, poor delegation, ineffective co-authoring, and a lack of professionalism. Instructors may also struggle with team-based projects—specifically how to improve student motivation, ensure equitable contributions, and assign individual grades.

This workshop is an opportunity for instructors to receive feedback on existing collaborative assignments. Participants will need to bring a copy of a collaborative assignment that they used either in fall semester or a previous semester (no need to create anything new for this workshop). During the session, participants will share their experiences with collaborative assignments and will engage in a feedback session to assist in revising those assignments for use in a future semester.


Grading in Canvas
Khendum Gyabak, CATL Instructional Designer
Monday, December 10, 2018 - 3:30-4:00 p.m., 102 Wing Technology Center

This session covers the assignment, quiz, and grading features in Canvas.  
No registration required.


Introduction to Canvas
Khendum Gyabak, CATL Instructional Designer
Wednesday, December 16, two sessions to select from:
9:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.
or 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
102 Wing Technology Center


This session introduces users to navigation, course tools, and communicating with students.