Creative Imperatives

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Schedule of events

All events take place on the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse campus and are free unless otherwise noted

View the map of event locations

DAILY EVENTS are located below the ongoing festival events on each tab, so keep scrolling!

ONGOING FESTIVAL EVENTS  

ART: Exhibition- All Students Juried Show

Location: Main Gallery, Center for the Arts

ALL: Student Research & Creative Work Display

Throughout the festival, posters, art, and other work created by students in the School of Arts & Communication will be on display in the lobby of the Center for the Arts.  The work includes both culminating class projects and undergraduate research.

ALL: Exhibition- Identity Matters Gallery

Enjoy this special exhibit showcasing the representation of identity through art, including the work of Advanced Graphic Design students as well as the art projects from the Educational Studies course “Choice in Advocacy Discourse.”

ART: Watch Them Work

The Watch Them Work series is designed to showcase several of the studios in the Department of Art. The format encourages audiences to visit multiple studios during this time to learn more about each creative process and how it shapes an artist’s identity. Participants are encouraged to get involved and make something of their own!

Printmaking
Time: 8:50 - 1`1:20 a.m.

Location: Room 334, Center for the Arts
Joel Elgin

You are invited to join the UWL printmakers, who, through the magical, mystifying acts of printmaking will assist you in in unmasking your true identity. Please bring a shirt and have it freshly printed with a UWL “Printfool” original artwork that will reveal your true character.

Blacksmithing & Metalsmithing
Time: 8:50 - 1`1:20 a.m.

Location: Rooms 20 & 23, Center for the Arts
Brad Nichols

Art majors will demonstrate both non-ferrous metalworking skills and traditional blacksmithing techniques. Students will be available to answer technical questions, discuss creative influences, and guide visitors through the two studios.

Ceramics
Time: 8:50 - 1`1:20 a.m.

Location: Room 25, Center for the Arts
Karen Terpstra

Attend a demonstration of ceramic techniques and a tour of the studio. There will also be opportunities to work with clay and to see examples of ceramic work from around the world.

Art History: 8 Swimming Lessons, or "This Is Not an Art History Lecture"
Time: 8:50 - 1`1:20 a.m.

Location: Room 120, Center for the Arts
Deborah Eve Lombard

A discussion of Marcel Duchamp and his belief that "What art is, in reality, is this missing link, not the links which exist. It's not what you see that is art; art is the gap." This session will be offered three times, starting at 8:50 a.m., 9:50 a.m., and 10:50 a.m.

THEATRE/MURPHY LIBRARY: Presentation & Discussion

From Performance on Paper to Performance Onstage

Time: 9:55 - 11:30 a.m.
Location: Frederick Theatre
Beth Cherne and Teri Halford-Talpe

How do playwrights create characters, complete with individual identities?  What happens when “characters” are based on real people from the past? How can the playwright/theatre company ethically and responsibly fill in the inevitable blanks in the stories of real, historical figures?  This session explores those issues through observation of a studio class in theatre, “Devising: Theatre From Scratch”, in which students will create theatrical scenes based on personal letters between two La Crosse sisters, Henrietta and Katharine Martindale, and other ephemera  found in the Murphy Library Area Research Center. Discussion of the session's central questions will follow the presentation.

MUSIC: Discussion

Music, Race & Gender- Changing Professional Stereotypes in Music

Time: 9:55 - 10:50 a.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall
Jonathan Borja, Tammy Fisher, Karyn Quinn

For many centuries, the classical music field was an “old boys club.” While there are acclaimed women and non-European musicians in music history, this century has witnessed the most progress in breaking down some of these stereotypes.  Dr. Borja, Dr. Fisher, and Ms. Quinn will host a panel discussion to share their experiences, offering perspective on the changes in these barriers as well as the stereotypes still in place within the music world.

ETHNIC & RACIAL STUDIES: Presentation

More Than a Label: Preserving the Sounds & Songs of the Greater Syrian Diasporsa in WI 1896-1961

Time: 9:55 - 10:50 a.m.
Location: Room 333 Center for the Arts
Richard M. Breaux

This session looks at the central role of vintage music in shaping Syrian-Lebanese American's sense of identity, self-determination, and connection to home and New York's Mother Colony from 1891-1961.  It explores the cultural and social history of Syrian-Lebanese immigrants and their children to Wisconsin with special focus on Syrian-Lebanese communities in La Crosse and Janesville, Wisconsin through the 78 rpm record collections of two families: Siad and Shaheenie Addis and Joe and George Melan. From 1901 to 1961, the most common form of recorded sound and music appeared on 10" or 12" 78 rpm phonograph discs.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES: Discussion

Sports Fandom, Rivalry and Identity

Time: 11:00 - 11:55 a.m.
Location: Room 1404, Centennial Hall
Greg Ormes, Kate Lavelle

Intense sports fandom serves as a salient example of how individuals adopt largely-arbitrary social identities that can have a profound impact on their behavior.  Examples abound of sports fans behaving in otherwise unconventional ways as a demonstration of their identity as a fan of a particular team.  This can range from humorous and innocuous examples such as fans celebrating shirtless in sub-freezing temperatures all the way to the profound and tragic examples of fans behaving violently toward fans of opposing/rival teams. With this session, we will use a series of salient examples to inform a dialogue about sports fandom and team rivalries that will enlighten us about the source of fandom identity and its sometimes-profound ramifications.

THEATRE: Performance

Musical Theatre Showcase

Time: 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Annett Recital Hall
Kathryn Skemp Moran

Who We Are, a musical revue featuring songs of identity and self discovery.  Singers from the musical theater vocal studio of Kathryn Skemp Moran perform songs that take on questions of who we are and why.

ALL: Presentation

The Over-Consumption of Native American Imagery and the Ongoing Results

Time: 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall
Daniel Green

An extensive collection of slides of contemporary Native American images and discussion of the patterns to be found in the collection, which have included primitivism, savagery, sex objectification, buffoons, anachronisms, and stereotypes. Dan Green’s research explores the misinformation, lies, stereotypes and myths about Native Americans which have resulted in an image, held by both Native and non-Native, that is archaic at best and psychologically harmful at worst.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES: Discussion

Conversations About Native American Identity:  We Are Still Here

Time: 1:10 - 2:05 p.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall
Tracy Littlejohn and the Native American Student Organization

Members of the Native American Student Association (NASA), featuring Tracy Littlejohn, will screen a short film and lead a discussion about past and current Native American imagery. Join NASA to discuss why it is so imperative to move Native American images from the past to the present.

ALL: Discussion

Disability, Access, and Identity on a College Campus

Time: 1:10 - 2:05 p.m.
Location: 1403 Centennial Hall
Students Advocating Potential Ability with guest Steve Anderson

Members of the organization of Students Advocating Potential Ability will lead a discussion about awareness and disability issues in a university setting.  Guest Steve Anderson is the Director of Disability Services at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

ART: Watch Them Work

The Watch Them Work series is designed to showcase several of the studios in the Department of Art. The format encourages audiences to visit multiple studios during this time to learn more about each creative process and how it shapes an artist’s identity. Participants are encouraged to get involved and make something of their own!

Printmaking
Time: 1:10 - 3:40 p.m.

Location: Room 334, Center for the Arts
Joel Elgin

You are invited to join the UWL printmakers, who, through the magical, mystifying acts of printmaking will assist you in in unmasking your true identity. Please bring a shirt and have it freshly printed with a UWL “Printfool” original artwork that will reveal your true character.

Photography and the Camera-Less Image
Time: 1:10 - 3:40 p.m.

Location: Room 26, WING Technology Center
Linda Levinson

Think you need a camera or at least your phone to take a photo? Come discover the world of Photograms, a photography technique that requires only light to capture an image. Participants will learn the tips and tricks, and leave with a creation or two of their own.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES: Presentation

Social Support for First Generation Students at UWL

Time: 2:15 - 3:10 p.m.
Location: Room 1404, Centennial Hall
Authrene Ashton, Jasmin Barnhill, Sonia Garcia,and Marquel Thelen

In this panel, students enrolled in CST 430: Advanced Topics in Interpersonal Communication will display their work, discuss the importance of understanding first-generation student identity on campus, and answer questions about this population of students. These participants are first-generation college students themselves, and this identity has played a role in their time as students here.

THEATRE: Demonstration

Makeup: Changing Your Identity to Suit the Scene

Time: 2:15 - 3:10 p.m.
Location: Makeup Room, Center for the Arts (in the basement!)
Joe Anderson

Actors have used stage makeup for generations to alter their appearance and create a new identity on stage.  Although the actor's true self is never completely hidden, it is the point of much stage makeup design to create an identity appropriate to any given production.  Come watch actors change their physical identity and get a peek at some "behind the scenes" work and techniques. How do you tear flesh for example, become an animal, become an alien...

PSYCHOLOGY: Presentation

Burial Practices and Identity

Time: 2:15 - 3:45 p.m.
Location: Room 1400, Centennial Hall
Erica Srinivasan and Ellen Rozek

How do burial practices inform our cultural and personal identities (including attitudes and beliefs) around death? Do they help us to embrace death as a part of life or avoid it? How do burial practices in an institutional setting and a home setting differ in the way they inform how we grieve and our identity around loss? These questions will be explored after viewing the film A Family Undertaking which takes a look at the cultural movement of home funerals and how that influences our cultural and individual identities around death and grief. Our overarching cultural identity towards death and our personal identity towards death inform the way we grieve and the way we identify our place in the greater world.

THEATRE: Discussion

Ridiculously Small Pockets, or The Challenges Women Face in a Stereotypically Male Work Environment

Time: 3:00 - 3:55 p.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall
Megan Morey, Nabamita Dutta, Adrienne Loh

This session will be a panel discussion on perceived and real identities of women working in male-dominated careers, exploring how and why society as a whole does not have a place for women who choose to do these jobs while still embracing other female attributes.

ALL: Discussion

Are Male and Female Faculty Perceived Differently as Teachers?

Time: 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.
Location: Room 1400, Centennial Hall
Nabamita Dutta- Economics, Grace Deason-Psychology, TJ Brooks- Economics, Terry Lilley- Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies

A discussion exploring the perceived differences between male and female faculty addressing the following questions: (1)  To what extent are student perceptions influenced by cultural and gender norms? (2) Do students address male and female faculty differently? (3) Why do SEI scores differ based on gender.  (4)  Do students perceive faculty differently as a result of their department/college?

COMMUNICATION STUDIES: Presentation

Identity After Memory Loss

Time: 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.
Location: Room 1404, Centennial Hall
Amber Jannusch, Ellen Rozek, and Erica Srinivasan

This panel will feature researchers and people with first-hand experience dealing with loved ones whose identities change (or do they?) with the loss of language and memory due to dementia. How do we communicate our identities when we lose our ability to speak and remember? What is our identity as a caretaker and family member of a person who no longer remembers us? This panel will be based on the panelists' research and personal stories.

RECEPTION & PRESENTATION OF STUDENT WORK

Time: 5:00 - 6:30 p.m.
Location: Lobby, Art Gallery, Room 116, Center for the Arts

Students from Art, Communication Studies, Music, and Theatre Arts will answer questions and share the inspirations behind the work that has been on display throughout the festival. The presentation will also include additional student music performances.

ARTIST TALK & DISCUSSION: Karen Olivo

Time: 7:30 p.m.
Location: Toland Theatre, Center for the Arts

A versatile actress of stage and screen, Karen Olivo can currently be seen in Chicago as Angelica Schuyler in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s smash hit Hamilton.  Olivo will share details of her journey from college musical theatre student to a leading role in In the Heights and a Tony-Award-winning performance as Anita in the 2009 Broadway revival of West Side Story  to a move from New York to Madison, Wisconsin where she traded the unflinching glare of Broadway life for a more balanced career teaching, writing, performing, and building a family. She explores the question of what defines your identity as a performer, and how stardom and stability can coexist.

 

ONGOING FESTIVAL EVENTS

ART: Exhibition- All Students Juried Show

Location: Main Gallery, Center for the Arts

ALL: Student Research & Creative Work Display

Throughout the festival, posters, art, and other work created by students in the School of Arts & Communication will be on display in the lobby of the Center for the Arts.  The work includes both culminating class projects and undergraduate research.

ALL: Exhibition- Identity Matters Gallery

Enjoy this special exhibit showcasing the representation of identity through art, including the work of Advanced Graphic Design students as well as the art projects from the Educational Studies course “Choice in Advocacy Discourse.”

EDUCATIONAL STUDIES: Discussion

Choice in Advocacy Discourse: Art Project I

8:50 - 9:45 a.m.
Location: 3rd Floor Art Gallery, Center for the Arts
J. Scott Baker

Undergraduate teacher education students in EDS 206, Multicultural Education, are asked to address lived experiences of race, gender, economic status, sexual orientation, religion, and citizenship to prepare for their future roles as teachers in PK-12 classrooms. Through the Choice in Advocacy Discourse (ChAD) project, students explore social justice and diversity through individual assignments, projects, and presentations to enhance their future PK12 students’ learning. The goal of this project is to better understand the role of social justice in teacher preparation.  The participating students will discuss their work and answer questions.

MUSIC: Artist Talk

Career Goals and Music

9:55 - 10:50 a.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall
Jonathan Borja and Festival Guest Brandon Ridenour

A conversation between Jonathan Borja and Festival Guest Brandon Ridenour about what it means to be a musician in the 21st century and what a musician needs to do to find his or her own voice in a field that is already too populated.

SOCIOLOGY: Workshop

Identities in Transition

9:55 - 11:55 a.m.
Location: Room 333, Center for the Arts
Dawn Norris

Using Professor Norris’s own research on job loss, identity and mental health as an illustrative case, the first part of this session will explore basic sociological perspectives perspectives on identity, identity threats, and successful identity-based strategies that promote mental health. The second part of the session is a guided hands-on workshop where participants can use these concepts to explore their own identity transitions, with a focus on creating the most positive transitional identity experience possible.

HISTORY: Presentation

It’s Me Mohannad- A Professor’s Foray into Making an Episodic Web Series

11:00 - 11:55 a.m.
Location: Room 102, Wing Technology Center
Heidi Morrison

A popular trend in documentary filmmaking right now is the production of episodic web series. These are scripted or non-scripted videos periodically released on the internet. Morrison will screen a short “webisode” from her project, which deals with the matter of transgender identities in a non-Western context.  She will discuss both the content of the video and the process of making the series while on a Fulbright research fellowship in Palestine.  The session will also include time for questions and comments from the audience.

THEATRE: Workshop

Changing Character through Improvisation

11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.
Location: Frederick Theatre, Morris Hall
Mary Leonard

Participants will observe a variety of exercises using improvised scenarios. Improvisation by its very nature exercises the act of discovering new identities to change character, personalities and perceptions.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES: Reading & Discussion

Reading and Discussion with Kirstin Cronn-Mills

12:00 - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall

Festival Guest Kirstin Cronn-Mills will read from her award-winning young adult book Beautiful Music for Ugly Children.  “Seventeen-year-old Gabe knows he’s a boy—he’s known that for a long time. And while his new job as a DJ for a local radio station allows him to be himself as he is, at home his parents struggle to come to terms with losing their daughter Elizabeth. It’s not long before the issue of Gabe’s identity comes to a head as he faces the challenges of the average American teenager—falling in love, hating your parents, and embracing self-acceptance—as well as the painstaking struggles of coming out as trans in a suburban high school environment.” (Lambda Literary Review)

BIOLOGY: Presentation

Insects vs. Humans: The Boundaries of Creativity and Industry

1:10 - 2:05 p.m.
LocationRoom 333, Center for the Arts
Barrett Klein & Robin Richardson

Picture an engaging discussion and mini-presentation that draws into question the exclusivity of human identity in the realm of creativity. How are we different in this respect to... the "lowly" insect? If human identity depends on our ability to think and behave creatively, is it appropriate for us to draw a line (quantitatively or qualitatively) when it comes to nonhuman animals, and insects in particular? The presentation will include  stunning examples of architecture, dance, etc.... as performed by insects and their closer relatives.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES: Discussion

The Opportunities and Limits of Allyship

1:10 - 2:05 p.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall
AJ Clauss, Terry Lilley, Will Van Rosenbeek, & Festival Guest Kirstin Cronn-Mills

A conversation about what it means to be an ally and about people who are in marginalized positions who deal with allies. When does an ally "go too far" and co-opt the rights and identities of those in marginalized identity groups?

MUSIC: Trumpet Master Class

1:10 - 2:05 p.m.
Location: Annett Recital Hall, Center for the Arts
Festival Guest Brandon Ridenour

Observers are welcome to join this session where virtuoso trumpet player Brandon Ridenour conducts a master class with UWL Music Students. An award-winning soloist and chamber musician, Ridenour will share the techniques that have led him to performances with groups including the iconic Canadian Brass, the National Symphony Orchestra, the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, and to a recital debut last year at Carnegie Hall.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES: Presentation

Reading and Performing Identity Through Social Media

2:15 - 3:10 p.m.
Location: Room 333, Center for the Arts 
Beth Boser

Communication scholars know that identity is a performance. However, the “stage” for the performance is incredibly complex in our heavily-mediated lives! Social media profiles and communication provide endless opportunities for us to cultivate, curate, and communicate our selves. This session invites the audience to reflect upon their mediated identities and consider questions such as: How do I construct and present myself through social media? Who is the audience (real or imagined) for this performance? How do I read and interpret the identities of others? Participants should be prepared to access and discuss at least one of their own social media accounts/profiles with others.

THEATRE: Presentation

Revealing Identity with Light

2:15 - 3:10 p.m.
Location: Toland Theatre, Center for the Arts
Ben Golden and Amanda Kolbe

Depending on intensity, focus, or color of light, our perceptions about identity of someone onstage can change. This session will explore how theatrical lighting can reveal different identities onstage during a production and why they change.

ALL: Film Screening & Panel Discussion

Inclusive Negligence

3:00 - 3:55 p.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall
Jamie Capetillo, Karter Etchin, Isabella Kilibarda, Pilar Olvera, Bedston Burrell, & Laurie Cooper Stoll

Following a screening of this powerful student film, audiences will have the chance to engage in conversation with some of the film’s creators about the topics raised.

ENGLISH: Workshop

Professional Identity and Building a Personal Brand

3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Location: Room 335, Center for the Arts
Lindsay Steiner

The development of a clear professional identity—or ethos—is a foundational starting point to success on the job market. Typically, job searches require a resume and a cover letter. While these documents are standard in the current job market, there are other important ways for applicants to communicate their professional identity to potential employers. This workshop will guide student attendees through the development of a personal brand for professional purposes. Student participants will discuss the idea and ethics of personal branding, and then work through the process of developing a personal brand statement that meets their needs. Students will leave the workshop with a carefully crafted set of their own professional values and expertise, as well as a preliminary personal brand statement.

ALL: Hands-On Discussion

Disability & Diversity

4:00 - 5:15 p.m.
Location: Hall of Nations, Centennial Hall

This session will explore definitions, myths, and truths about persons with disabilities, and how diversity enters into the picture.  Participants will join an active conversation and have a chance to gain some hands-on perspective. The discussion will also explore approaches to accommodations and support for students with disabilities on a college campus. The session will be led by Steve Anderson, Director of Disability Resources at Hamline University.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES: Event

Public Speaking Competition

4:00 - 5:30 p.m.
Location: Room 1309 & 1400, Centennial Hall
Kate Lavelle

The Public Speaking Competition promotes and showcases student excellence in public speaking. Six finalists, narrowed down from a pool of over 2,000 students enrolled in CST 110 during Spring and Fall 2016, will present their persuasive speeches to an audience of community members and UWL students, instructors, and staff. This event is organized and supported by the Department of Communication Studies.

MUSIC: Performance

7:30 p.m.
Location: Annett Recital Hall, Center for the Arts
Festival Guest Brandon Ridenour

Festival Guest Brandon Ridenour will treat audiences to a recital where he will be joined by Rich Ridenour on piano.  The program will showcase Brandon's versatility as a performer, including classics, his own arrangements, and some popular tunes.

Program

 

Wednesday, March 1

Presentation and Discussion:  CeCe McDonald

Time:  7:30 p.m.

Location:  Toland Theatre, Center for the Arts

Festival Guest CeCe McDonald shares the story of her journey to activism following her personal experience with bias, violence, and the criminal justice system.   In August 2014 McDonald was awarded the Bayard Rustin Civil Rights Award by the Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club.