Geography and Earth Science faculty and students are constantly working on remarkable and innovative research. Below you can find some of the latest developments, from conference presentations to book publications!

Current Research Projects

  • La Crosse River Marsh Lead contamination study
  • Isle Royale National Park Lead contamination project
  • Mississippi River biological community
  • Working with USGS with automated feature extraction software recognition developing land covers, experimenting with software, goal, getting it to process wetland vegetation and delineate different landcovers as well as research mississippi pools
  • Development of interactive web campus maps by students
  • Understanding the effects of climate on the ancient community of Aztalan, south-central Wisconsin
  • Mapping and modeling land use change in Ganges Delta Region, India
  • Wildlife conservation and community water access conflicts in Kenya
  • Reconstructing hydroclimatic variability during the past 2000 years in the Upper Midwest

Recent Publications

For recently published work from our faculty and staff, please see below.

2021 expanding section

Chaudhuri, G., Mainali, K., & Mishra, N. (2021, March). Analyzing the dynamics of urbanization in Delhi National Capital Region in India using satellite image based time series analysis. Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science.

2020 expanding section

Kelly, John. (2020).Village-scale reserves in the forest frontier regions of Chenes and Calakmul, MexicoJournal of Land Use Science (2-3), 203-220. DOI: 10.1080/1747423X.2019.1648578

Polk, M.H., Mishra, N.B., Young, K.R., & Mainali, K. (2020, July 28). Greening and Browning Trends across Peru's Diverse EnvironmentsRemote Sensing, 12(15), 2418. DOI: 10.3390/rs12152418

Hassan, Mohammad Mehedy, Meshari S. Alenezi, and Ryan Z. Good. "Spatial pattern analysis of manufacturing industries in Keraniganj, Dhaka, Bangladesh." GeoJournal 85.1 (2020): 269-283. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10708-018-9961-5 

Tatum, Sam, Caley Feemster, Jennifer Heeth, Sabine Nix, Jeffrey Luvall, Robert Griffin, Ryan Z. Good, Ryan Marshman, Amanda Tomlinson, and Chiara Phillips. “Kenya Food Security & Agriculture II: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Enhance Drought Warning Systems and Develop Capacity to Use the RHEAS Model in Kenya.” NASA DEVELOP Technical Report. April 3, 2020.

Bunbury, J., Risher R.G., and Blumenstein, T. Anthropogenic and climate change impacts on lake-water chemistry over the past 20 years, Upper Midwest, United StatesPhysical Geography. 2020; 41(5):433-450.

Mishra, N., Chaudhuri, G., Mainali, K., Mal, S., Tiruwa, B., Singh, P. Quantifying melt dynamics on a debris-covered Himalayan glacier using repeated UAS photogrammetry derived DSM and point cloud differencing. Preprints 2020, 2020070555 (do: 10.20944/preprints202007.0555.v1).

2019 expanding section

Colin S. Belby, Lindsay J. Spigel, Faith A. Fitzpatrick*, 2019. Historic changes to floodplain systems in the Driftless Area, The Physical Geography and Geology of the Driftless Area: The Career and Contributions of James C. Knox, Eric C. Carson, J. Elmo Rawling, III, J. Michael Daniels, John W. Attig

Chaudhuri, G., and Clarke, K. C. (2019), Modeling an Indian megalopolis– a case study on adapting SLEUTH urban growth model. Computer, Environment, and Urban System, Vol – 77: XX-XX.

Chaudhuri, G.,and Foley, S. (2019), DSLEUTH: a distributed version of SLEUTH urban growth model, SpringSim-ANSS 2019, April 29-May 2, Tucson, AZ, USA; ©2019 Society for Modeling and Simulation (SCS) International

Adjei Adams, E., Sambu, D., & Smiley, S.L (2019). Urban water supply in Sub-Saharan Africa: historical and emerging policies and institutional arrangementsInternational Journal of Water Resources Development, 35:2, 240-263. DOI: 10.1080/07900627.2017.1423282

2018 expanding section

Ryan, S.C., Belby, C.S., King Heiden, T.C., Haro, R., Ogorek, J., & Gerrish, G. (2018, October). The role of macroinvertebrates in the distribution of lead (Pb) within an urban marsh ecosystemHydrobiologia 827(1). DOI: 10.1007/s10750-018-3785-7

Olson, A.J., Cyphers, T., Gerrish, G., Belby, C.S., & King Heiden, T.C. (2018, August). Using morphological, behavioral, and molecular biomarkers in Zebrafish to assess the toxicity of lead-contaminated sediments from a retired trapshooting range within an urban wetlandJournal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Part A, 81(18), 1-15. DOI: 10.1080/15287394.2018.1506958

Adams, Ellis & Sambu, Daniel & Smiley, Sarah. (2018). Urban water supply in Sub-Saharan Africa: historical and emerging policies and institutional arrangements. International Journal of Water Resources Development. 1-24. DOI: 10.1080/07900627.2017.1423282.

2017 expanding section

Kelly, J., Herlihy, P., Tappan, T., Hilburn, A., & Fahrenbruch, M. (2017). From Cognitive Maps to Transparent Static Web Maps: Tools for Indigenous Territorial Control in La Muskitia, Honduras. Cartographica, 52(1) 1-19.

Mishra, Niti & Mainali, Kumar. (2017). Greening and browning of the Himalaya: Spatial patterns and the role of climatic change and human drivers. Science of The Total Environment. DOI: 587. 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.156.

Chaudhuri, G.(2017), Simulating urban growth in South Asia: A SLEUTH Application, Proceedings of Geocomputation 2017, September 5 – 7, University of Leeds, UK.

2016 expanding section

Mishra, N.B., Mainali, K. A. & Crews, K. A. (2016, May). Modeling spatio-temporal variability in fires in semi-arid savannas: A satellite based assessment around Africa's largest protected area. International Journal of Wildland Fire, 25(7). DOI: 10.1071/WF15152 

Mishra, Niti. B. Chaudhuri, G. (2016). Spatially Variable Vegetation Greenness Trends in Uttarakhand Himalayas in Response to Environmental Drivers. In R.B. Singh, U. Schickoff, & S. Mal (Eds.), Climate Change, Glacier Response, and Vegetation Dynamics in the Himalaya (365-376). Springer International Publishing Switzerland. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-28977-9_18

2015 expanding section

Belby, C.S., Rivera, A., & Gerrish, G. (2015, January). Understanding ecosystem change in upper Mississippi River backwaters through geochemical and biological analyses of sediment coresRiver Systems: Integrating landscapes, catchment perspectives, ecology, management 23: 2-3. DOI: 10.1127/rs/2015/0102

Chaudhuri, G. & Clarke, K.C. (2015, February 1). On the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of the Coupling between Land Use and Road Networks: Does Political History Matter? Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, 42(1), 133-156. DOI: 10.1068/b39089

Mishra, Niti & Crews, Kelley & Neeti, Neeti & Meyer, Thoralf & Young, Kenneth. (2015). MODIS derived vegetation greenness trends in African Savanna: Deconstructing and localizing the role of changing moisture availability, fire regime and anthropogenic impact. Remote Sensing of Environment. DOI: 169. 192-204. 10.1016/j.rse.2015.08.008.

Dutta, S., and Chaudhuri, G. (2015), Mapping Environmentally Sensitive Areas of Rajasthan in Western India, Geographical Review, Vol. 105 (4): 441-461

Mishra, N. B., and Chaudhuri, G.(2015), Spatio-temporal Analysis of Trends in Seasonal Vegetation Productivity across Uttarakhand, Indian Himalayas, 2000-2014, Applied Geography, Vol. 56, pp. 29-41.

2014 expanding section

Hargan, K.E., Rühland, K.M., Paterson, A.M., Holmquist, J., MacDonald, G.M., Bunbury, J., ... Smol, J.P. (2014, December 9). Long-term successional changes in peatlands of the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada inferred from the ecological dynamics of multiple proxiesThe Holocene, 25(1), 92-107. DOI: 10.1177/0959683614556384

Perroy, R.L., Belby, C.S., & Mertens, C.J. (2014). Mapping and modeling three dimensional lead contamination in the wetland sediments of a former trap-shooting rangeScience of the Total Environment, 487: 72-81. 

Loisel, J., Yu, Z., Beilman, D.W., Camill, P., Alm, J., Amesbury, M.J., Anderson, D., Andersson, S., Bochicchio, C., Barber, K., Belyea, L.R., Bunbury, J., ...Zhou, W. (2014, July 3). A database and synthesis of northern peatland soil properties and Holocene carbon and nitrogen accumulationThe Holocene, 24(9), 1028-1042.  DOI: 10.1177/0959683614538073

Finkelstein, S.A., Bunbury, J., Gajewski, K., Wolfe, A.P., Adams, J.K., & Devlin, J.E. (2014, April). Evaluating diatom-derived Holocene pH reconstructions for Arctic lakes using an expanded 171-lake training setJournal of Quaternary Science 29(3): 249-260. DOI: 10.1002/jqs.2697

Chaudhuri G., Oxley S., Wenzlaff S. (2014). Mapping Spatiotemporal Patterns of Liquor Law Violation Citations During Oktoberfest in College Town of La Crosse, Wisconsin. In: Elmes G., Roedl G., Conley J. (eds) Forensic GIS (201-220). Geotechnologies and the Environment, vol 11. Springer, Dordrecht. DOI: 10.1007/978-94-017-8757-4_10

Mishra, Niti & Chaudhuri, Gargi. (2014). Spatio-temporal Analysis of Trends in Seasonal Vegetation Productivity Across Uttarakhand, Indian Himalayas, 2000-2014. Applied Geography. DOI: 10.1016/j.apgeog.2014.10.007.

2013 expanding section

Chaudhuri, G. & Clarke, K.C. (2013, September 12). Temporal Accuracy in Urban Growth Forecasting: A Study Using the SLEUTH ModelTransactions in GIS 18(2): 302-320. DOI: 10.1111/tgis.12047

Undergraduate Research & Creativity (URC)

For information on how to get started on your undergraduate research projects, you are encouraged to check out the resources listed below.

Undergraduate Research and Creativity (URC) Resources expanding section

UWL's Undergraduate Research & Creativity staff are here to help you on your path to funding, presenting, and publishing your work. To see how they can help you, visit their website

UWL Undergraduate Research and Creativity Grants expanding section

UWL offers a variety of ways for students to fund their research and creative projects. In fact, 21% of UWL seniors have worked on a research project with a faculty member. For information on grants and fellowships as well as their deadlines, please visit their webpage.

For other scholarships visit the Scholarship Resource Center and the database here: http://www.uwlax.edu/scholarships/

College of Science and Health (CSH) Travel and Supplies Grant expanding section

Due Dates for Applications

  • First Monday in September (fall funding) - Sept. 6, 2021
  • First Monday in February (spring funding) - Feb. 1, 2021
  • First Monday in May (summer funding) - May 3, 2021

Purpose

The CSH Student Research Travel and Supplies Grants are designed to facilitate the development and initiation of collaborative research projects between Science and Health faculty and their undergraduate students. Projects funded in this program are intended to provide students with "hands-on experience" in the research process. As a condition of funding, all recipients are required to present the results of their work at one of the Annual UWL Research and Creativity Symposia. Students who apply for Supplies funding are encouraged to also present their results at an off-campus meeting or symposium (these students may then apply for a Travel Grant - see Type B).

Grant Awards

Individual students, and collaborative teams of students (see Collaborative Projects below) submitting single proposals may apply for no more than $500 Supplies and up to $500 Travel per academic year, plus up to $500 per summer (Supplies or Travel). Requested funds are restricted to project supplies (Type A) or to research-related travel (Type B). Students may apply for both types of grants during a given academic year. CSH Travel and Supplies grants may be used in combination with other student or faculty research grants. The period of the grant will coincide with the fiscal year (July 1 through June 30), although faculty mentors may negotiate other time limits with the Dean. Total grants sponsored by a faculty mentor are limited to $1500/year for supplies and $2000/year for travel.

Eligibility

To be eligible for a grant award, students must:

  • be an undergraduate currently enrolled at UWL
  • be majoring in one of the Science and Health disciplines
  • have a cumulative GPA > 2.5
  • be a full-time student during the academic year period from the application date through the semester of the grant award (summer Supplies grant awardees must remain full-time students during the subsequent Fall semester).
  • not be performing the research project as an assignment in a formal class

Collaborative Projects

Teams of students working collaboratively on a single project may apply for no more than $500 per project for Supplies and no more than $500 per project for Travel. They must submit a jointly written proposal that includes signatures of all participants. Students working individually on separate, but related aspects of a larger project may each apply for up to $500. These students must each submit a separate, original proposal that clearly defines the student's individual role in the larger project.

Application Information

Grant proposals are accepted anytime but are reviewed three times per year. Review dates are the first Mondays in October, December, and April. Any proposals received after these dates will be held until the following review date. Early submission is recommended. Proposals will be evaluated by a committee of faculty from various Departments within the CSH, and awards will be announced in a timely manner.  Applicants should submit the complete proposal to the College of Science and Health via email (csh@uwlax.edu). Information for applicants for Supplies or Travel grant applications, application forms (pdf), and examples of successful grant proposals are available on this website.

Examples of successful grant proposals

Proposal Requirements

TYPE A - SUPPLIES

Supply Application

Supplies grants are intended to aid in the purchasing of consumable or capital supplies needed to conduct the specific research proposed by the applying undergraduate student. Funds may not be used for office supplies or copying fees (these should be supplied by the host department).

Students who are awarded a Supplies grant will be required to:

Present the results of their research at the UWL Research and Creativity Symposium of the awarding year (Fall and Spring funding) or following year (Summer funding). Graduating seniors unable to return to present their research may arrange for their work to be presented by their faculty mentor, or a student continuing the project. Information on abstract due dates and presentation requirements may be found on the  UWL Undergraduate Research and Creativity (URC)  website.

Supplies grant proposals must include the following sections, in the order indicated:

  1. Application cover sheet(page two of the application)  
  2. Abstract  (< 300 words)
  3. Narrative (see below)
  4. Itemized budget (see below)  not exceeding $500 (allowances will be made for specific pieces of equipment or supplies that just exceed the $500 limit). Relevant catalogs should be reviewed for current costs - do not estimate.
  5. Bibliography
  6. Faculty endorsement (see below).

Instructions for specific sections of the proposal are listed below.

Abstract:  (< 300 words) This should describe in layman's terms the significance of the proposed work, the objectives of the specific project, and a brief overview of the methods to be used. Bear in mind that the review committee is made up of members from diverse fields of study. Avoid the use of jargon.

Narrative (< 3 pages, double-spaced, one inch margins, 12 point type) This should be written to a general science audience, avoid excessive use of jargon, and should include clear and concise statements of the following:

  • the background and significance of the proposed work, including review and citation of pertinent scientific literature;
  • the project objectives;
  • the project methodology;
  • the exact nature, extent, and timescale of student involvement (including the student's current year in school, expected graduation date, and expected duration of involvement in the project);
  • plans for disseminating the results;
  • a list of other resources needed e.g., space, equipment, labor, and/or additional supplies, and
  • a list of past, current, or pending funding [e.g., UWL, Sigma Xi, etc.], including the amount and the period of funding.

Budget:  (page three of the  application) The estimated cost of performing the research project should be itemized and be based on current prices from catalogs or phone quotes (indicate the source). Items should be limited to those that directly impact the proposed research project and not include other general supplies that may be needed to run the Advisor's research efforts. Commonly found bulk lab supply requests (e.g., common chemicals, plastic ware, etc.) should be clearly justified by the faculty mentor.

Faculty Endorsement  (< 2 pages, single-spaced, one inch margins, 12 point type) Advisors should write a letter to the committee that includes the following information. Failure to address all of the points indicated could result in a reduction in the score of the student's proposal, and possible reduction of funding.

  • a statement of the mentor's willingness to work with the student;
  • a justification of this willingness based on: (a) the student's prior work and abilities, (b) benefits of the research to the student's educational experience, (c) how well the proposed work will contribute to the mentor's on-going research;
  • an explanation of why funds are needed from this source if the faculty member is funded from other sources or a statement of lack of funding from other sources, and
  • a verification of the mentor's willingness to help the student to prepare results for submission of oral presentations, posters, and/or manuscripts.

Examples of successful grant proposals

 

Proposal Requirements

TYPE B - TRAVEL

Travel Application

Student Travel Grants are designed to allow undergraduate student researchers the opportunity to present the results of their work at professional meetings external to the UWL campus. Awards may be requested for travel, registration, and lodging and may be used in combination with other student or faculty research grants. Grant funds may not be used to pay for food. Proposals must be submitted and approved by the Travel and Supply Grants Committee prior to the date of the professional meeting to be attended.

Students who are awarded a Travel grant will be required to:

Present the results of their research at the UWL Research and Creativity Symposium of the awarding year (Fall and Spring funding) or following year (Summer funding). Information on abstract due dates and presentation requirements may be found on the UWL Undergraduate Research and Creativity (URC) website. Graduating seniors who apply for Summer funding should plan to present their results (complete or incomplete) at the Research Symposium of their senior year.

Travel award grant proposals must include the following sections, in the order indicated:

  1. Application cover sheet(page two of the application)
  2. Abstract (see below)
  3. A short  narrative (see below) : < 2 pages, outlining the background, results and discussion, and selected bibliography relevant to this presentation.
  4. A list of other presentations of work from this project (either local or off-campus)
  5. Meeting information (see below)
  6. Detailed budget (see below)
  7. Faculty endorsement (see below)

Abstract:  The abstract should be a copy of the official abstract submitted to the conference or symposium. If the abstract has not yet been submitted, a proposed abstract is acceptable.

Narrative:  This section should include background, study objectives, results and a discussion of the significance of the work, along with a selected bibliography relevant to this presentation. Committee members represent a variety of different departments in the College, and are unlikely to be familiar with your particular field. While the research in a Travel grant proposal will not be evaluated, your ability to communicate the research will be evaluated. Therefore, the narrative must be written to a general science audience, avoiding excessive use of jargon, and defining terms particular to the field.

Meeting information should include:

  • name of meeting,
  • description of the type of meeting (e.g., state, regional, or national event; undergraduate or professional, etc.),
  • presentation format (poster or oral presentation, for example),
  • location of meeting,
  • dates of meeting,
  • mode of transportation,
  • names of other UWL faculty and students attending. If others are attending, efforts should be made to reduce the costs of travel by sharing rooms, car rides, etceteras.

Budget  (page three of the application) The itemized budget should include a detailed list of travel costs (for travel by car, see mileage reimbursement), registration fees, and lodging (indicate the the total cost per night and the number of persons per room). Students are encouraged to share a room to reduce the cost of attendance. If the total meeting costs are greater than $500, applicants should indicate how the balance will be funded.

Faculty Endorsement (< 2 pages, single-spaced, one inch margins, 12 point type) Research mentors should write a letter to the committee that includes the following information. Failure to address all of the points indicated could result in a reduction in the score of the student's proposal, and possible reduction of funding.

  • verify the student's role as author and presenter,
  • justify the travel request based on the quality and readiness for presentation of the research findings,
  • describe the type of meeting and it's value to the student presenter, and
  • indicate whether the faculty advisor will be attending the meeting, and/or if there will be any other faculty attending,
  • indicate any other sources of funding, especially if the cost of the meeting exceeds the $500 award limit.

Examples of successful grant proposals

College of Science and Health (CSH) Dean's Distinguished Fellowships ($5,000) expanding section

The Dean's Distinguished Fellowship program fosters collaborative research between an undergraduate and a faculty mentor. Students from all College of Science and Health academic programs participate in a range of scientific and scholarly experience. This is a premier and highly selective program that has multiple benefits for students, faculty mentors, and has a significant impact on the overall success of the College of Science and Health. The goal is to increase the number of fellowship opportunities for CSH students with the support of generous donors. For more information, please visit their webpage.

The deadline for applications for Summer 2021 has. Applications were due Monday, February 22, 2021.

  • $5,000 fellowships for undergraduate summer research projects
  • Must be a declared CSH major in good standing with a minimum 3.0 GPA
  • Must contribute 30 hours per week over 10 weeks

Dean's Distinguished Fellowship Recipients from Geography and Earth Science

Year Student Research Title Faculty Mentor
2021 Jordan Hoehnen Particle Size Analysis of a Lake Sediment Core to Understand Periods of Floods and Droughts in the Upper Midwest Since the Last Glacial Period Joan Bunbury
2021 Dirk Lueck Investigation and Mapping of Invasive Non-Native Understory Woody Shrubs in the Driftless Region of Wisconsin John Kelly
2019 Aaron Christensen Fine-Scale characterization of spring phenology in a North American Prairie using Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) imagery Niti Mishra
2018 Jackson Radenz Examing the potential of Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) acquired imagery for genus level mapping of vegetation on UW-La Crosse campus Niti Mishra
2016 Alex Engelson Determination of Trace Metals in Mississippi River Backwater Sediments Using XRF Colin Belby
2013 Steven Oxley Lead Contamination in Passage Island Soils and Rock Pools, Isle Royale National Park Colin Belby
2013 Rebecca Roider Determination of Heavy Metals in Hair & Nail samples through XRF analysis Ryan Perroy
2012 Cody Mertens Creating a 3-Dimensional Model of lead Contamination in the La Crosse River Marsh Ryan Perroy
2011 Sara Marie Erickson Measuring the spatial distribution of lead contaminants in the La Crosse River Marsh Colin Belby

Undergraduate Research Projects

Listed below are undergraduate research projects performed by Geography and Earth Science students and their faculty mentors. 

Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)

Jordan Hoehnen

Particle Size Analysis of a Lake Sediment Core to Understand Periods of Floods and Droughts in the Upper Midwest Since the Last Glacial Period

*received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

Joan Bunbury

Dirk Lueck

Investigation and Mapping of Invasive Non-Native Understory Woody Shrubs in the Driftless Region of Wisconsin

*received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

John Kelly
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)

Ethan Lucas

Mapping Purple Loosestrife at Lake Neshonoc Using Deep Learning Classification Technique on Drone Imagery

*received URC Grant

Gargi Chaudhuri, Niti Mishra
Sydney Graff, Blake Olson Pool 8 of the Mississippi River: Shady Maple Classification Cynthia Berlin
Paul Lee Hmong Access to Mental Health Facilities in Wisconsin: Variation in Time and Space John Kelly
Sydney Graff Mapping Past Mountaineering Fatalities in the Himalayas Gargi Chaudhuri
David Holmes Quantifying Changes in Mass Balance and Surface Velocity of a Himalayan Glacier Using Repeat Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Survey Niti Mishra
Carly Martinco Organic and Carbonate Content From a Lake Sediment Core, South Central Wisconsin Joan Bunbury
Olivia Meurette, Ryan Killmer, Austin Halley, Danielle Mori Is There a Correlation Between Particle Size and Organic Matter in Sediment? Joan Bunbury
Alydia Downs, Amy Kolly, Zoe Reissner, Taylor Prill Charcoal Analysis of a Mud Lake Sediment Core to Determine Anthropomorphic Impact Joan Bunbury
Ryan Lynch, Dylan Langer, Aiden Austin, Ryan MacDonald Particle Size Analysis of a Sediment Core from Mud Lake, Wisconsin Joan Bunbury
Carly Martinco, David Holmes, Sophie Pitney Creating a Paleoenvironmental Record of Frequency and Magnitude of Fires in Central Wisconsin from Sediment Core Charcoal Deposits - Mud Lake, Wisconsin Joan Bunbury
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Katherine Berglund

Comparing Migration Rates Inside and Outside the Tohono O’odham Reservation

John Kelly
Matt Brown, Gavyn Ver Hage Pool 18 Mississippi River Land Cover/Land Use Comparison Cynthia Berlin
Aaron Christensen Examining the Potential of Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Imagery for Genus Level Mapping of Native Prairie Vegetation in Wisconsin Niti Mishra
Aaron Christensen

Fine-Scale characterization of spring phenology in a North American Prairie using Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) imagery

*received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

Niti Mishra
Bo Kim Slum Classification Map in Mumbai with OBIA and CNN Gargi Chaudhuri
Paul Lee, Austin Golla, Ryan Olson Land Cover Classification Upper Mississippi River Pool 5 Cynthia Berlin
Jackson Radenz

Genus Level Mapping of Woody Vegetation in University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Campus Using Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Imagery

*received URC Grant

Niti Mishra
Josie Talbert, Gabrielle Geller

Land Cover Use Map of the Upper Midwest Mississippi River System Pool 8

*received URC Grant (Josie Talbert)

Cynthia Berlin
Nancy Yang Revealing Sanist Space within a University Campus: Marginalization of Mad People at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse John Kelly
Matthew Peck Mapping of University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Campus and Creation of Interactive Web Map While Utilizing ADA Guidelines Around Campus Gargi Chaudhuri
Megan Hickinbotham, Sophie Pitney Elemental Composition of Mud Lake Sediment Cores Joan Bunbury
Maxwell Molls Creating a Social Development Index for Use in Equitable Planning
 
Gargi Chaudhuri
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Charlotte Peters Analysis of a Lake Sediment Core to Determine Climate Joan Bunbury
Andrew Anklam Using Unmanned Aerial Systems Based Infrared Remote Sensing to Identify Archaeological Features at the Termain Site Niti Mishra
Jackson Radenz Species Level Mapping of Treeline Vegetation in Nepal, Himalaya Using Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Imagery for Monitoring Climate Change Impacts Niti Mishra
Jackson Radenz

Examining the potential of Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) acquired imagery for genus level mapping of vegetation on UW-La Crosse campus

*received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

Niti Mishra
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Emily Healy, LeAnna Bender, Zachary Gearing Reliability of Results Generated by Two Sedimentary Techniques Using Replicate Samples from a Lake Sediment Core Joan Bunbury
Mitchel Larson, Jenna DeShaney Comparative Analysis of Violent Crime Events in Milwaukee and Chicago Gargi Chaudhuri
Jeff Meckstroth The Effect of Food Deserts on Obesity Rates Gargi Chaudhuri
Karl Radke Habitat Mapping in the Belize Barrier Reef Using Sonar Colin Belby
Leah Krbecek, Rebecca Horn, Michael Maziarka, Ryan O'Connor, Juan Pablo San Emeterio Sedimentary Analysis of a Lake Sediment Core Collected from Mud Lake, Southeast Wisconsin Joan Bunbury
Caroline Myhre, Rachel Kromery, Elliot Keller Mineralogy of the Sediments of Mud Lake, Southeast Wisconsin, Determined Using X-ray Diffraction Joan Bunbury
Zachary Woodcock Satellite Derived Greening and Browning of Vegetation in Wisconsin and Minnesota: Spatial Patterns and Associated Environmental Drivers Niti Mishra
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Justine Bula

Migrations in Relation to Conflict

*received URC Grant

Georges Cravins
Evan Weis Mapping Instances of Mountaineering Fatalities in the Himalaya between 1950-2006 Gargi Chaudhuri
Alex Engelson

Determination of Trace Metals in Mississippi River Backwater Sediments Using XRF

*Received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

Colin Belby
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Jonas Rugtvedt

Road Network Analysis of Oslo, Norway

*received URC Grant

Gargi Chaudhuri
Ryan Sneath, Samuel Munoz Radiocarbon Dating of Lake Sediments for the Development of a Climate Record for the Ancient Settlement of Aztalan (A.D. 1000-1250) Joan Bunbury
Tim Wilda Using Charcoal to Reconstruct Sedimentation History of the Upper Mississippi River Colin Belby
Jordan Keller Collection and Initial Description of Mississippi River Backwater Sediment Cores Colin Belby
Dylan Hamel Bike Accessibility in La Crosse, WI Gargi Chaudhuri
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Caitlin Cullimore Using X-ray Fluorescence to Quantify Lead Content in Vegetation Colin Belby
Spencer Kawell A Stratigraphical Analysis of the Tremaine Sie: Erosional Processes Preserving Oneota Remains Colin Belby
Nathan Noble Sandstone Rock Shelter Distribution of the Kickapoo Valley Reserve Colin Belby
Michael Heing Public Perception of Severe Weather Risk Colin Belby
Steve Oxley

Lead Contamination in Passage Island Soils and Rock Pools, Ise Royale National Park

*received URC Grant

Colin Belby
Year Student Research Title Faculty Mentor
2013 Steven Oxley

Lead Contamination in Passage Island Soils and Rock Pools, Isle Royale National Park

*Received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

Colin Belby
2013 Rebecca Roider

Determination of Heavy Metals in Hari & Nail samples through XRF analysis

*Received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

Ryan Perroy
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Megan Bain Quantifying the effects of exposure to different educational materials on the amount of collected post-consumer food waste for the UW-La Crosse Vermicomposting Program Ryan Perroy
Cody Mertens

Using X-Ray Fluorescence and Statistical Analysis to Quantify the Spatial Distribution of Lead Contamination

*received URC Grant

Ryan Perroy
Cody Mertens

Creating a 3-Dimensional Model of lead Contamination in the La Crosse River Marsh

*Received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

Ryan Perroy
Alexander Wegner

Behind the Scenes of StormTeam 8

*received URC Grant

Rafique Ahmed
Carmen Alicia Rivera Perez, Kali Schreiner, Connor Hutchinson Upper Mississippi River Core Analysis Colin Belby, Gretchen Gerrish (BIO)
Quinn Lewis Spatial Variation in La Crosse, WI Residential Infiltration Rates Colin Belby
Sara Erickson Measuring the Spatial Distribution of Lead Contaminants in the La Crosse River Marsh Colin Belby, Ryan Perroy
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Sarah Graf, Christina Kinney, Ian Johnson, Rachelle Amundson UWL Carbon Emissions: Comparisons and Recommendations Cynthia Berlin, Robin Tyser (BIO), Kristofer Rolfhus (CHEM)
Tricia Flaherty Mapping the Spread of Fennel on Santa Cruz Island Ryan Perroy
Sarah Leschisin, Marty Falk Examining Soil Properties Along an Island Chronosequence in the Upper Mississippi River Ryan Perroy
Sara Marie Erickson

Measuring the spatial distribution of lead contaminants in the La Crosse River Marsh

*Received Dean's Distinguished Fellowship

Colin Belby
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Miranda Froehlich Development of a Tree-Ring Chronology from Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginia, L.) for the Upper Mississippi River Valley Dean Wilder
Larry Prock The General Wind Characteristics of the Greater La Crosse Region Rafique Ahmed
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Ben Johrendt The Impacts of Volcanoes on Guatemala and its People James Handley
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Anthony J. Beauchaine, Elizabeth Werdemann Using Ground Conductivity as a Geophysical Survey Technique to Locate Potential Archaeological Sites in the Bad Axe River Valley of Western Wisconsin Dean Wilder
Lynn Ketterhagen Prehistoric Clay Sources: A Forensic Exercise in Geoarcheology Dean Wilder
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Kyle Herdina Water Quality in the Wuamundee Wetland Cynthia Berlin
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Greg Manke A Satellite-Based Assessment of the 2001 La Crosse Flood Cynthia Berlin
Joshua Schoen Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests Near Palembang, Indonesia Cynthia Berlin
Beth Stueven A Study of Land Cover and Thermal Changes at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Cynthia Berlin
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Amy Annen Morphology of Drumlins: A Comparative Analysis of Selected Drumlin Fields in North America Dean Wilder
Joseph S. Hamilton An Archaeological and Geomorphological Perspective of the Solverson Site (47VE1252), Vernon County, Wisconsin Dean Wilder
Elizabeth Schultz Relationships Between Morphological Features and Weathering Resistivity in Sandstone Layers Dean Wilder
Student(s) Research Title Faculty Mentor(s)
Jonathan Hoekenga An Assessment of Rainforest Change Using Satellite Images for the Bragantina Region of the Amazon River Basin Cynthia Berlin
Luther Leith Identification and Analysis of a Buried Prairie Soil at the Ernie Bank Archaeological Site, Vernon County, Wisconsin Dean Wilder
Tiffany L. Newman Site Formation Processes of the Gail Stone Archaeological Site (47Tr3351) in Tempealeau County, Wisconsin Dean Wilder