PH-CHE Preceptorship Expo - Virtual Zoom Presentation

The Preceptorship Expo for the Fall 2020 semester will be a virtual presentation this Friday, December 4, 2020, at 10:00 am.  If you would like to attend the virtual PH498 presentation, please contact Professor Katie Wagoner, Preceptorship Coordinator,  kwagoner@uwlax.edu for the link and permission access to the Zoom presentation.

 

 

UW La Crosse Alumni Association - What’s new Wednesdays

Thriving in the wake of COVID-19's new normal 

Drs. Dan Duquette and Gary Gilmore shared what UWL is doing to support students during the COVID-19 pandemic, and discussed ways alumni and community members can stay safe and healthy.  They shared with the audience their perspectives on the long-term implications of the pandemic.

Online: Watch the recorded presentation. 

HEHP PH~CHESpring 2020 Preceptorship Graduates

Environmental Health course at UWL learning from COVID-19

Dr. Dan Duquette's PH 335 Environmental Health class at UW La Crosse

COVID-19, alongside other coronaviruses, such as SARS and MERS are a hot topic right now in UWL's Environmental Health course.

The class, taught by Dr. Dan Duquette, focuses on real-life examples of the viral interaction between people, the environment and animals. 

Students at UW-La Crosse study the origins of the Coronavirus and its threat

Students at UW La Crosse in Dr. Dan Duquette's PH 335 Environmental Health class were busy studying about the coronavirus Tuesday as part of their environmental health class.

CHE 350 Cr.3

Biometry and Research Design

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of research procedures and protocol. Through this course, one will develop a better understanding of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting valid, reliable data. The proper and improper uses of statistics, designing research experiments, and data handling will be examined. In addition, the basic procedures involved in the design and implementation of evaluation research will be examined. Prerequisite: admission to the public health and community health education major. Offered Occasionally.

CHE 360 Cr.3

Methods and Strategies for Health Education

The purpose of this course is to help participants develop skills and strategies in relation to facilitation, instruction, as well as the use of theoretical concepts to more effectively implement health education and health promotion programs. Course participants will gain an understanding of the various ways in which people learn and develop a variety of skills to create effective learning strategies. Participants will also comprehend the fundamentals of social marketing as well as health literacy and how these concepts should be used to create more effective health education and health promotion programs. Additionally, participants will learn how to use health behavior theories and models to create culturally appropriate health education materials. Prerequisite: admission to the public health and community health education major. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHE 370 Cr.3

Motivational Interviewing for Health Educators

This course introduces participants to principles, concepts, and spirit of Motivational Interviewing (MI), which is an evidenced-based method, grounded in theory meant to facilitate behavior change. Participants will learn the process of exploring and resolving the ambivalence that often creates barriers to change in various populations. Participants will also learn how to properly share information, give advice, and plan for action using the spirit and methods of MI. Additionally, participants will also gain an understanding of how to interpret and apply a behavioral screening or diagnostic questionnaire as they relate to the referral individuals for MI with various health concerns that need to be addressed. Prerequisite: admission to the public health and community health education major. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHE 380 Cr.3

Assessment and Program Planning in Health Education

Grounded in the responsibilities and competencies of a health education specialist, this course will require groups of students to assess community needs and resources as well as plan health education programs. Following models commonly used in public health, students will collect primary data as well as utilize secondary data to perform a comprehensive assessment of a population of interest. Reliable and valid resources that explain the health status of a population from the perspective of theories and ethically conducted research will be used when prioritizing and planning interventions. Students will learn about the necessity of early alignment between assessment and evaluation in health education program planning. Peer reviewed literature, professional competencies, and community involvement will be emphasized as essential to planning best practices solutions to community health needs. Prerequisite: PH 335 or HED 335; PH 340 or CHE 340; CHE 360; CHE 370. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHE 400/500 Cr.3

Health Policy, Advocacy, and Community Organizations

This course focuses on the process of engaging communities in health education and behavior change programs of various kinds. Several organizing paradigms for fostering healthy communities are examined, and their practical and ethical implications are considered. Skill development for community assessment, constituency-building, and leadership of participatory planning efforts is emphasized. Students are paired with health and human services, health policy and social justice agencies, and coalitions to gain an in-depth knowledge of agenda setting, legislative research, and legislative advocacy in relation to specific legislation being proposed in the Wisconsin state legislature. Course will tie policy theory to real-world practice. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: PH 335; PH 340; CHE 360; CHE 370 or CHE 475 topic "Motivational Interviewing;" junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHE 405/505 Cr.3

Strategies for Increasing Physical Activity in Communities

This course is designed for community health educators who plan to work with clients and patients in a variety of health and clinical settings. Students will come away with an understanding of how to advance the use of physical activity for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease and other health issues. The course will explore how physical activity improves health, including cardiorespiratory and metabolic diseases, overweight and obesity, musculoskeletal disorders, cancers, and mental health. Data on the prevalence and economic costs are presented to demonstrate the scope of the health issues and the importance of addressing them. Evidence-based strategies for increasing physical activity in individuals and populations using three approaches (informational, behavioral and social, and environmental and policy) will be explored. Strategies for implementing physical activity opportunities in communities will also be addressed. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Spring.

CHE 430/530 Cr.3

Grant Writing and Resource Management

The grant seeking enterprise is studied and applied to community and public health organizations, in areas of perceived community need. Content includes locating and communicating with funding agencies, writing and reviewing grant proposals, analyzing requests for proposals, using technology in grant seeking, and implementing and evaluating grant funded projects. Project planning and administrative competencies are incorporated. Budget planning and grant administration is identified and applied. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: CHE 350 or CHE 380; CHE 400; junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHE 450 Cr.3

Implementation, Administration, and Evaluation of Health Education Programs

Students will implement, administer, and evaluate a community health education program. Interventions will be based on professional best practices and social and behavioral theories and models. Data will be collected that allow students to evaluate goals, objectives, and activities. Students will be required to generate a report at the end of the semester that can be used to inform decision makers on the success of the program and can be added to the professional evidence base. Prerequisite: CHE 380, CHE 400. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHE 460/560 Cr.1

Medical Terminology for Health Education

Skill development for working with the special language used in clinics, hospitals, and other health agencies. Students in various health fields will learn to use medically related terms in their professional communication. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: ESS 205 and ESS 206, or BIO 312 and BIO 313; junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHE/SHE 475/575 Cr.1-3

Workshop in Health Education

Group study of varying health education topics, community agencies, and educational institutions. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Repeatable for credit under different topics - maximum six credits combined CHE/SHE. (Cross-listed with CHE/SHE.) Departmental option for pass/fail or letter grade. Prerequisite: junior standing. Consent of instructor. Offered Occasionally.

CHE 480 Cr.3

Senior Capstone

This course is designed as a culminating course that will engage participants in applying the skills and concepts they have developed throughout the program curriculum. In particular, students will apply the profession's areas of responsibility as well as ethical standards in various activities, discussions, and projects. In addition, participants will 1) review selected community health topics in our Public Health and Community Health Education program, 2) be introduced to current issues in community health education, public health and population health, 3) be introduced to the employment, educational, and political dynamics in selected occupational settings, and 4) assess and discuss their specific pre-professional needs at this point in time. Prerequisite: CHE 350 or CHE 380; CHE 400. Offered Fall, Spring.

+HED 207 Cr.3

Youth Health Issues

This exploratory course is designed to identify the health issues that affect youth throughout various stages of their development. Societal institutions that support the healthy growth and development of youth will be identified, while students consider strategies that enable the healthy mental/emotional, physical, and social development of today’s youth between the ages of 4-18. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 210 Cr.3

Foundations of Health Education

This course explores introductory concepts related to the field of health education. Basic principles, philosophies, and issues related to health education are presented. In addition, health education as a career option is examined and the role of the health educator in numerous settings discussed. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 320 Cr.3

The U.S. Health Care System

This course provides an overview and a developmental summary of the U.S. health care system and its driving forces and offers comparisons to other national health systems. Content includes major elements of the health care system and a consideration of today’s major health policy issues in a historical, economic, and political context. The course will also explore current issues confronting the health care system, raise important concerns and questions related to the different approaches to health care delivery, and identify key ethical issues. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 345 Cr.3

Issues in Mental and Emotional Health

This course examines the determinants of emotional and mental health which form a basis for health and healthy choices. A variety of constructs including, but not limited to resiliency, family and social processes, self-concept and learning that form the foundation for emotional and mental health will be presented and discussed. Students will be encouraged to deepen their commitment to effective teaching and learning. Prerequisite: HED 210 or admitted to EC-MC or MC-EA Certification. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 409/509 Cr.1

Stress Management and Relaxation Skills

An introduction to the detrimental effects of stress on an individual and the corresponding benefits of regular relaxation. This course will emphasize the basic skills of relaxation and will provide an experience that focuses on the practical application of these skills in one’s life. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 412/512 Cr.3

Women's Health Issues

This course will provide an opportunity for participants to identify major health issues confronting women today and to examine appropriate health prevention and health promotion lifestyle choices. It will explore health issues from the traditional medical model to the holistic model and provide a comprehensive overview of critical, contemporary women's health issues. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Occasionally.

HED 425/525 Cr.3

Violence and Injury Prevention

Participants will review the major forces leading to violent behavior and injury in the United States and globally. Trends over time will be carefully reviewed and analyzed in order to detect risk factors and protective factors. Violence and injury prevention strategies will be reviewed, resulting in the development of prevention and intervention proposals using community-based programming and curriculum development strategies. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 467/567 Cr.1-2

Experiential Learning Strategies for Health Education

This course examines emerging educational processes, strategies, and issues and how they can be applied in the facilitation of health education and health promotion programs in the school and/or community setting. Topics will vary per offering and target audience. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: HED 210 or teacher certification; junior standing. Offered Occasionally.

HED 469/569 Cr.3

Drugs, Society and Human Behavior

This course is directed at introducing social, psychological, pharmacological, and cultural aspects of drug use, misuse, and abuse. In addition, the methods, materials, and theories of drug abuse prevention in the school and community will be introduced. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 105; junior standing. Offered Spring.

HED 471/571 Cr.2

Health Education Responsibilities, Competency and Certification

Participants will have the opportunity to review the National Health Educator Competencies Update Project research resulting in a hierarchical model that serves as a framework for the Responsibilities and Competencies comprising the Entry, Advanced 1, and Advanced 2 levels. Each one of the seven Responsibilities will be examined with practitioner examples, and a review will be conducted for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) national examination. Weekend and online formats. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Occasionally.

HED 472/572 Cr.3

Sexual Health Promotion

A review of current information on health and human sexuality. Emphasis is given to biological, psychosocial and educational aspects of human sexuality with special emphasis on instructional activities related to interpersonal communication, decision-making ability and clarification of values. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: ESS 205 or BIO 312; ESS 206 or BIO 313; or admitted to EC-MC or MC-EA Certification; and junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 473/573 Cr.3

Health Aspects of Aging

An exploration of the lifelong aging process and an examination of health factors affecting the elderly. Emphasis is given to the changes in a variety of health areas including, but not limited to, physical activity, nutrition, mental health, long-term care, sexuality, and death, dying and grief. The course will also include a service-learning component. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 474/574 Cr.3

Nutrition Education

Basic principles of nutrition are covered as well as current problems and topics regarding both personal and world nutrition today. Designed for the public school teacher, the community health educator, or those in related fields. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

HED 485/585 Cr.1-3

Confrontations of Death

This course is designed to allow students to consider death both generally and on an individual basis. Various programs and experiences will be used to help individuals confront their own mortality and its relationship with the vitality of life. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Occasionally.

HED 495/595 Cr.1-3

Independent Study in Health Education

Individualized study of areas not available in existing courses. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: junior standing. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

HWM 300 Cr.3

Introduction to Human Health

This course is designed to provide students with a general background knowledge on many of the issues impacting our health today. Topics of study will include issues in mental, physical and social health such as stress, nutrition and fitness, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs, relationships and sexuality and diseases and disorders. An introduction to behavior change theories and the factors contributing to overall wellness will also be included. Prerequisite: Introduction to Biology. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 305 Cr.3

The Wellness Profession

This course explores the definition of wellness, health promotion and the seven dimension model of wellness. Students will learn the professional role and personal commitment required to implement life-style wellness programs. The course includes an overview of the history and philosophy contributing to the success of wellness and health promotion professionals. Students learn through assigned experiential learning the basic wellness principles. Activities explore personal wellness and whole systems healing in the seven-dimensions of spiritual, physical, emotional, career, intellectual, environmental, and social. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 310 Cr.3

Changes Across the Lifespan

This course explores research and theory regarding the nature and processes of human development from early adulthood through old age and death. Key topics include biological theories of aging; the changing body; disorders of the brain; personality development; changing memory and thinking skills; relationship issues; careers and retirement, and death/dying. Prerequisite: Introduction to Biology. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 315 Cr.3

Workplace Wellness Program Management

The objective of this course is to examine the issues in healthcare and defining the quality of care in healthcare programs. The course will focus on health care financing and insurance, objectives of financial management, leadership styles, managing costs, and managing healthcare professionals. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 320 Cr.3

Health and Medical Terminology

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to basic health terminology. Since health care uses a unique blend of prefixes, suffixes, and terms related to both preventative and clinical care, it is important that the wellness professional has the knowledge and abilities to decipher this information. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 325 Cr.3

Health Literacy

This course will explore the current understandings and work in health literacy research, advocacy, and outreach efforts across the various health education and related fields. It will include readings, discussions, and competencies in evaluation of health information for quality and credibility; locating health information and determining quality resources; identifying and assessing population health literacy; and understanding the networks of agencies working in health settings to address literacy in the health field. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 335 Cr.3

Worksite Health Environment

This course examines the workplace environment's influence on daily health decisions and focuses on practical, contextual levers of behavioral change. Novel insights from the fields of behavioral economics and consumer marketing will be reviewed to help students understand the cognitive barriers to health behavior change and the environmental “nudges” that can be leveraged to overcome these barriers at work. Students will explore environmental assessment tools, active design principles, workplace policies, supportive research and real world examples. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 345 Cr.3

Physical Activity and Nutrition for Wellness Managers

This course presents professional recommendations and guidelines for physical activity and nutrition. Students will design workplace strategies that will meet recommendations and guidelines to support employees. Prerequisite: Introduction to Biology. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 350 Cr.3

Research and Statistics for Wellness Managers

This course is designed to familiarize students with research nomenclature, procedures for the design and evaluation of research and interpretation of statistical analysis in the health field. This course will also provide the tools for critically evaluating the validity of health research. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 360 Cr.3

Stress, Dependencies, and Addictions

This course examines common behavioral strategies with regard to stress and its management, and the use of alternative remedies for physical and emotional dependencies and addictions. Prerequisite: Introduction to Biology; Introduction to Psychology. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 370 Cr.3

Understanding and Effecting Health Behavior Change

This course provides the basic knowledge of foundational change theories, including the Transtheoretical Stages of Change model, in order to help students understand how health behavior change happens. Included in the course is a self-reflection on personal wellness and strategies for implementing health behavior change. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology; HWM 300. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 385 Cr.3

Marketing and Communication for Wellness Managers

Students will develop basic marketing and promotional skills, grounded in the disciplines of social marketing, health communication and business marketing that address consumer health "needs" and customer "wants." Students will be able to assess market opportunities in wellness services, programs and facilities, and create marketing strategies and tactics. Emphases will be placed on best practices for behavior change, increased cost savings for employers, improved customer/employee participation and /or revenues for wellness programs, services and facilities. Prerequisite: HWM 325. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 405 Cr.3

Survey of Information Technology in Wellness

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of information technology tools in the wellness industry and legal considerations for their use, such as but not limited to web portals, online assessments, health records applications, telephonic and digital health coaching, online challenges, online tracking tools, social media, videos, podcasts, mobile apps, and wearables. Prerequisite: HWM 315. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 430 Cr.3

Population Health for Wellness Managers

This course introduces the evolution of health problems and services and will examine the methods designed to capture a community health profile. The participant will apply concepts involved in measuring and understanding the health of individuals and populations in order to enhance quality of life. The key social determinants of wellness and their interactions will be considered. Prerequisite: HWM 300; HWM 350. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 460 Cr.3

Leadership and Change Management in Health

This course will examine the various leadership and management styles, including business models of leadership. Organizational behavior, decision-making, and attributes of effective leadership will be reviewed in this course. Understanding the impact of changes in healthcare, wellness, and fitness programs on various organizations is an objective of this course. Prerequisite: HWM 315. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 470 Cr.3

Assessment and Evaluation for Wellness Managers

This course surveys general approaches to assessment, programming and evaluation in health and wellness settings. Participants will explore individual, group, and organizational approaches to assessment, programming, and evaluating planned and organized efforts to promote both health and wellness. Prerequisite: HWM 335; HWM 430. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 475 Cr.3

Employee Health and Well-Being

Successful companies must understand the importance of workplace involvement in health. The relationship of employee health to healthcare costs and productivity will be discussed as a return on investment (ROI) and an investment in human capital. Strategic and product management planning are developed in relationship to disease management versus population wellness theory. Assessments of employer needs, organizational culture, environmental policy, and procedures supportive to desired outcomes are practiced. Professionals learn about aligning client needs and wants with best practice program design, implementation, and evaluation for successful results. Age, gender, race, and issues that affect participation in wellness programs are reviewed. Prerequisite: HWM 385. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 480 Cr.3

Employee Benefits for Wellness Managers

The design and administration of a health care plan plays a key role in attracting and retaining employees and implementing employer's cost savings. This course is designed to provide students with a solid introduction to the basic issues of health care benefits and teach students how to integrate successful return on investment (ROI) strategies for adopting preventive health benefits that enhance employees' well-being. Prerequisite: HWM 315. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 485 Cr.3

Health Coaching for Wellness Managers

The course will assist in developing a strong, useful theoretical viewpoint for health coaching as well as understanding the approaches of therapists and how differential treatment therapeutic goals are set. The definition of coaching and diverse methodologies will be taught, practiced, compared, and contrasted. Students will specifically gain an understanding of what treatment and by whom is most effective for individuals displaying specific problems and under what set of circumstances. As a result students will learn a variety of treatment modalities and learn to respect vastly differing world views. Prerequisite: HWM 305; HWM 370. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 492 Cr.1-6

Independent Study in Health and Wellness Management

This course is designed as a supplement to the required course work in HWM to meet special interests and/or needs of the student. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 493 Cr.1

Health and Wellness Management Fieldwork Prep

This course requires students to identify and secure fieldwork placement for completion the following semester. The fieldwork experience develops skills in program planning, implementation, promotion and evaluation, oral and written communication, collaboration and networking. Consent of department. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 494 Cr.3

Health and Wellness Management Fieldwork

Students engage in practical fieldwork experience as a pre-professional in a health/wellness setting to utilize skills and knowledge acquired in previous courses. This fieldwork experience is designed to further develop skills in some, but not necessarily all, of the following areas: program planning, implementation, promotion and evaluation, oral and written communication, collaboration and networking. Prerequisite: HWM 460, HWM 470, HWM 480, and HWM 493. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HWM 496 Cr.3

Health and Wellness Management Capstone

This course requires the application of knowledge and skills acquired through successful completion of all HWM courses taken prior to or concurrent with this course. Using a case study, students demonstrate competence in health and wellness management by completing assignments and participating in discussions that results in the logical, sequential building of a strategic plan for a comprehensive corporate wellness program. Students demonstrate interviewing, professional networking and resume writing skills along with formally presenting their final strategic plan. Prerequisite: HWM 460, HWM 470, HWM 480. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+PH 200 Cr.3

Public Health for the Educated Citizen

This course introduces the context and scope of public health from historical, modern, and postmodern perspectives. Historical perspective will be used to explain the philosophical foundations, ethics, methods, and essential services that make up public health. Modern perspectives will be used to explain a century of controlling communicable diseases, lengthening lives, and the emergence of new challenges. A postmodern perspective will be used to explore persistent health disparities, social determinants of health, and public health in an era of globalization. Participants will be challenged to consider their role in public health as citizens and/or professionals in a free society. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

PH 204 Cr.3

Introduction to Global Health

This course introduces participants to global health through its history, definition, determinants, and development as a field of study. The inter-connection between health problems in developed and developing countries and the interdisciplinary approach necessary to understand and address health problems and issues will be emphasized. Students will learn about the health status in regions of the world and various populations within those regions, and they will be able to suggest how health indicators are likely to change over time and explain why. They will also develop a basic understanding of the methods used to assess population health, and be able to discuss why some populations are healthier than others and what can be done to reduce health disparities. Offered Fall, Spring.

PH 335 Cr.3

Environmental Health

This course will examine the interdisciplinary and global impacts of human-environment relationships. Emphasis is placed on the critical nature of our understanding these relationships in order to improve ecosystem health, human health and well-being, global economics and sustainability. Politics, economics, science, technology, human behavior (both individual and collective), history, ethics, and the media are examined for the purpose of improving the quality of life for all people through the creation of a sustainable global society. The science, methods and processes of environmental health will be considered. The role of environmental health in public and population health will be examined. Prerequisite: admission to the public health and community health education major or an environmental studies minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

PH 340 Cr.3

Epidemiology and Human Disease Prevention

This course provides an introduction to epidemiology as a basic science for public health. It will address the principles of the quantitative approach to public health. The course will introduce measures of frequency and association, introduce the design and validity of epidemiologic research, and give an overview of appropriate data analysis for understand population health. An introduction to the skills needed by public health professionals to interpret critically the epidemiologic literature. The influence of epidemiology on legal and ethical issues will be presented. Prerequisite: admission to the public health and community health education, school health education major, or healthcare analytics management minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

PH 498 Cr.1-15

Community Health Education Preceptorship

Professional experience in a community health education setting for a full semester. The student works under faculty supervision with a professional in health education/health promotion who serves as a mentor. Repeatable for credit - maximum 15. Prerequisite: successful completion of all program course requirements; recommendation of the department; major GPA of 2.75. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

SHE 310 Cr.4

Introduction to Curricular Processes and Instructional Techniques

Beginning concepts in comprehensive school health education curriculum development and instructional techniques are the core of this course. Skills for delivery of effective health instruction are practiced including assessment, planning, implementation, and reflection. This course also includes an introductory field experience that is designed to help the teacher candidates identify the tile of the school and its staff through observation and participation. Lect. 3, Lab 1. Prerequisite: HED 210; admission to teacher education. Offered Spring.

SHE 410/510 Cr.6

Application of Curriculum Processes and Instructional Techniques

This senior level experience provides an opportunity to apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium Standards (InTASC). The primary focus is on a teacher candidate's growth and development in the InTASC standards. The traditional field experience or participation in a Professional Development School experience will address how the InTASC standards impact teaching and learning. Further analysis of method selection and instructional strategy development is included from a practical as well as philosophical point of view. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Lect 4, Lab 2. Prerequisite: SHE 310 or admitted to EC-MC or MC-EA Certification; SHE majors must take in last semester prior to student teaching and concurrently with SHE 415; admission to teacher education; junior standing. Offered Fall.

SHE 415/515 Cr.3

School Leadership for Health Educators

This course will develop teacher candidates' leadership skills in school health programming. An overview will be included on the following topics: group dynamics, leadership theories and styles, resources and grants, curriculum assessment and analysis, administration and coordination of health curriculum, and professional skills. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: SHE 310 or concurrent enrollment; admission to teacher education; junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHE/SHE 475/575 Cr.1-3

Workshop in Health Education

Group study of varying health education topics, community agencies, and educational institutions. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Repeatable for credit under different topics - maximum six credits combined CHE/SHE. (Cross-listed with CHE/SHE.) Departmental option for pass/fail or letter grade. Prerequisite: junior standing. Consent of instructor. Offered Occasionally.

SHE 492 Cr.1

Student Teaching Seminar in School Health Education

This seminar course provides an opportunity to discuss and further develop teacher candidates' critical thinking regarding issues of the field and practice of educating school-age individuals. As a result of this course, teacher candidates will be able to discuss current issues experienced within their student teaching experiences as well as issues around the areas of professionalism, conflict resolution, and classroom management. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment with SHE 494 or SHE 495; admitted to EC-MC or MC-EA certification program; passing content competency benchmarks. Consent of department. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Fall, Spring.

SHE 494 Cr.5-11

Student Teaching in School Health Education: Early Childhood-Adolescence

Student teaching is a full day, full school semester (~18 week), professional experience in a selected elementary, middle, or secondary school with qualified, approved cooperating teachers. Orientation, seminars and classroom projects required. May be repeated for credit in a subsequent semester for each additional licensure. Prerequisite: completion of all requirements in education, including special methods courses; recommendation by the appropriate education program faculty; 2.75 cumulative GPA and a 2.75 GPA in the major, minor, concentration. Consent of department. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading. Offered Fall, Spring.

SHE 495 Cr.3-15

Teaching Internship

Teaching internship is a full day, full school semester, professional experience in selected PK-12 schools with qualified, approved cooperating teachers. Orientation, seminars and classroom projects required. Must apply and be selected for an approved internship opportunity through the Office of Field Experience. Wisconsin Internship Program placement and a State Intern License. Must be licensed as an intern according to PI 34.028 of Wisconsin State code for educator licenses. Registration occurs through the Office of Field Experience only. Prerequisite: completion of requirements in education, including special methods courses; recommendation by the appropriate education program faculty; 3.0 cum GPA; passing content competency benchmarks; acceptance into internship opportunity by Office of Field Experience. Consent of department. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading. Offered Fall, Spring.

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