Graduate sustainability-related courses

Courses With a Prominent Sustainability-Focused Theme 

BIO 541 Environmental Toxicology The study of the lethal and sublethal effects of chemical contaminants on ecosystems and humans. Topics covered include environmental legislation, chemical distribution and fate in the environment, methods of toxicity testing, assessment of exposure and risk, effects of chemical contaminants on humans, and fish and wildlife populations, communities and ecosystems, and toxicity of specific chemical groups. Prerequisite: BIO 307 or 341; CHM 104.
BUS 750 Managing in an Environmental and Socially Conscious World This course analyzes business decisions in the context of environmental, human rights, and social responsibility issues. The course provides an open, balanced, and interdisciplinary approach that examines the complex social, environmental, and human rights issues central to the conscientious management of business organizations. The course will examine these issues in business decision situations, explore solutions from alternative paradigms of corporate governance and incorporate them when formulating organizational tactics and strategy.
CHM 512 Environmental Chemistry This course examines the role of chemistry in shaping our environment, including atmospheric, aqueous, and terrestrial components. Students learn how fundamental chemical principles are applied to complex real systems in order to characterize environmental behavior and aid in prediction and decision making. Specific topics explored include climate change, ozone depletion, smog formation, water quality and treatment, energy policy, and the fate/transport of pollutants.  Prerequisite: CHM 301.
ESC/GEO 560  Environmental Hazards and Land Use Planning Environmental processes are investigated in light of the hazards they might pose for development and how they may be avoided or mitigated by proper land use planning. Prerequisite: ESC 221 or ESC 222. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
MGT 736 The Global Environment of Business This course focuses on current changes in the global environment with which U.S. corporations and managers interact. Emphasis is placed on understanding contemporary changes in the global environment. Contemporary and current changes are examined from a managerial and business perspective that focuses on the inter-dependence of the U.S. and other countries and trading blocs in the global environment of business.
MIC 730 Biodegradation and Bioremediation of Environmental Contaminants Microbes are able to breakdown, or biodegrade, a wide variety of compounds including some considered hazardous to human health and/or the environment. The use of microbes as biological agents to reclaim polluted soils and waters is called bioremediation. This course will explore some of the better-studied mechanisms used by microbes to degrade and detoxify contaminants. Practical aspects for the use of microbes in bioremediation and some specific examples will also be covered. In addition, the students will present and discuss a series of special topics such as nuclear waste bioremediation or current clean-up efforts in the news. Prerequisite: one semester organic chemistry; MIC 230 or equivalent microbiology course.
PH 707 Environmental Health Examination of how environmental mechanisms influence human health and how humans impact environmental conditions. A critical analysis of current environmental problems and evidence linking these problems to disease causation and health enhancement. Solutions to environmental health problems will also be critically analyzed.
REC 740 Outdoor Education A study of the philosophy, resources, skills, methods and activities associated with the natural environment as a laboratory for the achievement of some of the purposes and objectives of education. The focus of the course is on direct participation and leadership situations in the out-of-doors. Repeatable for credit — maximum four.

Sustainability-Related Courses 

ARC 592 Archaeology Analysis Procedures for Teachers Taking a hands-on approach to analyzing and interpreting archaeological remains, the class will integrate lectures with demonstrations, experiments, and supervised laboratory projects. Study will focus on the potential for interpreting human lifeways and adaptations to the laboratory environment from stone tools, ceramics, floral, and faunal remains. Practical application of the interpretation process will be related to the classroom of the pre-collegiate instructor. Introduction will provide an overview of field procedures. Prerequisite:  ARC 490/590 or ARC 493/593.
BIO 505 Aquatic and Wetland Vascular Plants Identification and collection of vascular plants of aquatic and marsh habitats with emphasis on adaptive morphology and ecology of local species. Field trips required. Lect. 1, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: BIO 203 or 204.
BIO 506  Parasitology A survey of the major groups of animal parasites with regard to their taxonomy, morphology, life histories, host-parasite relationships, and economic importance. Lect. 2, Lab 4. Prerequisite: BIO 203 or 210 or 303.
BIO 512  Mycology A survey of all the major groups of fungi of the fungal kingdom (and relatives) in terms of systematics, anatomy, morphology, ecology, physiology, genetics, evolutionary relationships, and human and plant pathology. Laboratory includes microscopic and macroscopic study of the fungi, as well as making a collection of cultures and of fungal reproductive structures (including mushrooms) from selected groups. Lect. 2, Lab. 4. Prerequisite: BIO 203 or 204 or MIC 230. Both are strongly recommended.
BIO 514 Freshwater Invertebrate Zoology Introduces the ecology and taxonomy of the metazoan, non-parasitic freshwater invertebrates. An extensive course designed to provide a foundation for taxonomic knowledge, and basic understanding of the biology and ecology of freshwater invertebrates for advanced students in aquatic and environmental sciences. Lectures will focus on ecology; labs on taxonomy and quantitative skills. A student reference collection and weekend field trips will be required. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: BIO 203 or 210 or 341.
BIO 519 Quantitative Methods in Ecology An introduction to field and laboratory procedures used by ecologists to describe and analyze the interactions between organisms and their environments. The course will emphasize quantitative techniques, including the use of computer technology, for collecting, recording and interpreting ecological data. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: BIO 307 or 341.
BIO 522 Ichthyology A study of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of fish, with emphasis on the fresh water fishes. Lect. 2, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: BIO 203 or 210 or 303.
BIO 542 Plant Microbe Interactions This course will explore in-depth various ways that plants interact with microbes in the environment, at the macroscopic, cellular, and molecular levels. Case studies will include both parasitic and mutualistic (symbiotic) interactions. Microbes include fungi, bacteria, nematodes, and viruses. Includes plant pathology and studies of the beneficial relationships between plants and microbes. Inquiry-based labs are integrated into the lecture and discussion sessions. Lect. 2, Lab 2. Prerequisite: BIO 203 or BIO 204, MIC 230 and BIO 306 or MIC 416. (Cross-listed with BIO/MIC; may only earn credit in one department.)
BIO 547 Standard Methods/Quality Assurance Water Analyses This course will instruct students on the use of standard methods for analyses of selected biological, chemical, and physical constituents commonly included in water quality analyses. Quality assurance procedures, including Good Laboratory Practice Standards (GLPS) will be integrated into all activities. Materials covered include: principles of methods used; evaluation of precision, bias, and contamination; proper reporting and interpretation of results; and environmental sources and significance of constituents analyzed. Lect. 1, Lab 4. Prerequisite: BIO 203 or 204 or 210 or 303, and 3 semesters of college chemistry. BIO 341 recommended.
BIO 548 Aquatic Toxicology A study of the lethal and sub lethal effects of chemical contaminants in aquatic systems, specific chemical effects, chemical distribution and fate, and environmental legislation. Procedures for toxicity evaluation, experimental design and statistical analysis will be emphasized in the laboratory. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: four semesters of college biology, BIO 341 recommended, and three semesters of college chemistry.
BIO 556 Plant Ecology Conservation biology, ecological restoration, and predicting the effects of climate change all require an understanding of plant ecology. This course is focused on the interactions among plants, other organisms, and the environment. We will work across the individual, population, and community levels, and emphasize an exploratory approach to plant ecology. Class activities will include lectures, the discussion of ecological journal articles, and carrying out student-designed experiments.
BIO 563 Aquatic Animal Health The study of pathogens of aquatic animals, including fish, shellfish, crustaceans, amphibians, waterfowl and mammals. Sections on nutrition and toxicology are included. Emphasis is on laboratory techniques for isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria, viruses and parasites. Field trips required. Lect. 2, Lab. 3. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or 105, 203 or 210 or 303, and CHM 103; MIC 230 strongly recommended.
BIO 564 Stream and Watershed Ecology Introduces key concepts and theory pertinent to understanding and managing fluvial ecosystems (rivers and streams) and their watersheds. The course will emphasize rivers as large-scale physical and biological systems. Course work includes a comparative case study of distinctive types of temperate, tropical, and polar rivers. Prerequisite: BIO 341 or BIO 307.
BIO 573 Marine Biology Marine biology is an interdisciplinary field that includes elements of geology, physics, chemistry and biology. Students will gain an introduction to how biological organisms deal with varying physical, geological and chemical conditions found in marine ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on current conservation concerns and marine invertebrate diversity.
BIO 576 Ecosystem Ecology Ecosystems include the living and non-living components of an environmental system and have emergent properties that can only be understood by examining the system as a whole. This course will examine advanced ecological topics centered around the structure and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Topics covered will include the development of the ecosystem concept, ecosystem succession, production/decomposition, energy transfer in food webs, and nutrient cycling. The course will consist of classroom lectures, problem sets, and reading/discussion of relevant literature.
BUS 760 Managing in a Global Environment This course develops the critical skills and integrated knowledge necessary to function effectively in today’s global environment. The course describes how global agreements, changing technologies, global institutions and evolving political patterns affect the conduct of global business. This course develops the ability to frame problems from multiple managerial perspectives — including operational, economic, environmental, ethical, financial, cultural, and technological frames of reference — and to apply sophisticated decision making and coalition building processes to arrive at integrated solutions in a diverse and changing world. This course will typically employ a problem-based approach to the subject area and will seek to integrate, in this approach, such traditional functional disciplines as operations, logistics, marketing, finance, accounting, information systems, and management. This course is offered as a campus course and an Internet course.
CI 581 Environmental Education Methods This course is designed to develop an under-standing of curricula, instructional methods and materials and evaluation techniques for K-12 level environmental education based upon educational research, contemporary practices and Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction recommended goals and expectations. Prerequisite: GEO 200 and EDS 351 or EDS 402.
ECO 740 Macroeconomic Policies in Global Economy A detailed examination of the fundamentals of international monetary economics and macroeconomic policies. Currency markets and exchange rates, the balance of payments accounts, the market for goods and services, and money and the banking system in relation to foreign exchange will be discussed. Short-run and long-run macroeconomic policies under fixed and flexible exchange rates, and their impact on interest rates, prices, and output are emphasized. Prerequisite: not open for credit to students who have completed ECO 441/541.
EDU 651 Democracy, Diversity and Social Justice in Education I: Introduction In this first course of four, students will be introduced to the concepts of democracy, diversity, and social justice in education. Coursework requirements include application to the workplace setting and communication via technology. The key concepts of this course include: diversity issues, privilege and power, language and communication, and democracy.
EDU 652 Democracy, Diversity and Social Justice in Education II: Exploration In this second course of four, students will explore the concepts of democracy, diversity, and social justice in education. Coursework requirements include application to the workplace setting and communication via technology. The key concepts of this course include: diversity issues, harassment and bullying, and democracy in schools.
EDU 753 Democracy, Diversity and Social Justice in Education III: Integration In this third course of four, students will integrate democracy, diversity, and social justice in education. Coursework requirements include application to the workplace setting and communication via technology. The key concepts of this course include: diversity issues and democracy in the classroom.
EDU 754 Democracy, Diversity and Social Justice in Education IV: Action In this fourth course of four, students will take action with regard to democracy, diversity, and social justice in education. Coursework requirements include application to the workplace setting and communication via technology. They key concepts of this course include: current social justice issues and educational policy.
ESC 522 Meteorology and Weather Forecasting Various principles and laws which govern the behavior of the atmosphere are investigated. Laws of gases and radiation, energy exchange between the earth and the atmosphere, laws of motion, various forces governing atmospheric motion, atmospheric moisture and psychrometry, condensation, preciptable water and precipitation, atmospheric stability/instability, thermodynamic characteristics of the atmosphere, vorticity, and synoptic meteorology are discussed. Surface and upper-air charts, synoptic patterns, thermodynamic charts, radar and satellite images, and weather patterns are analyzed for weather forecasting. Prerequisite: ESC 101 or equivalent. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
ESC 525 Biogeography A systematic analysis of the geographic distribution of organisms from historical, ecological and regional perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the principles and the methods of biogeography. Special reference is made to biogeographic regions, the distribution of organisms in space and time, and ecological biogeography. Prerequisite: ESC 221. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
ESC 526  Soil Morphology and Genesis A comprehensive study of soils around the world and the factors and processes that drive their formation and dynamic evolution. Emphasis is placed on soil morphology, pedogenesis, and biogeochemical influences within the soil environment. A one-credit lab section is devoted to the hands-on exploration and study of soils through laboratory and field exercises. Prerequisite: ESC 221 or ESC 222. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
ESC 530 Fluvial Geomorphology A systematic study of the interactions between flowing water and surface landforms. Emphasis is placed on watershed and stream development, sediment transport and storage, flow frequency analysis, and applications of fluvial principles to river management and stream restoration. Class activities will include field exercises in the La Crosse region, mathematical analysis of hydrologic variables, and spatial analysis with Geographic Information Systems. Prerequisite: ESC 221 or ESC 222. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO, may only earn credit in one department.)
ESC 540 Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photographs Systematic applications of aerial photographs in the interpretation and analysis of geographic problems. Emphasis is placed on digital photograph interpretation within a geographic information system. Topics include urban and rural land use, natural resource, and environmental assessment. Lect.2, Lab 2. Prerequisite: ESC/GEO 385. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
ESC 545 Advanced Remote Sensing Advanced techniques of digital satellite and airborne image analysis and processing, emphasizing theory and applications in natural resource, land use and environmental assessment. Includes practical approaches to integrating imagery with geographic information systems area for spatial analyses and decision making. Data acquisition, integrity, manipulation, formatting, storage, and retrieval are also examined. Prerequisite: ESC/GEO 345. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO: may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 522 Meteorology and Weather Forecasting Various principles and laws which govern the behavior of the atmosphere are investigated. Laws of gases and radiation, energy exchange between the earth and the atmosphere, laws of motion, various forces governing atmospheric motion, atmospheric moisture and psychrometry, condensation, preciptable water and precipitation, atmospheric stability/instability, thermodynamic characteristics of the atmosphere, vorticity, and synoptic meteorology are discussed. Surface and upper-air charts, synoptic patterns, thermodynamic charts, radar and satellite images, and weather patterns are analyzed for weather forecasting. Prerequisite: ESC 101 or equivalent. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 525 Biogeography A systematic analysis of the geographic distribution of organisms from historical, ecological and regional perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the principles and the methods of biogeography. Special reference is made to biogeographic regions, the distribution of organisms in space and time, and ecological biogeography. Prerequisite: ESC 221. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 526  Soil Morphology and Genesis A comprehensive study of soils around the world and the factors and processes that drive their formation and dynamic evolution. Emphasis is placed on soil morphology, pedogenesis, and biogeochemical influences within the soil environment. A one-credit lab section is devoted to the hands-on exploration and study of soils through laboratory and field exercises. Prerequisite: ESC 221 or ESC 222. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 530 Fluvial Geomorphology A systematic study of the interactions between flowing water and surface landforms. Emphasis is placed on watershed and stream development, sediment transport and storage, flow frequency analysis, and applications of fluvial principles to river management and stream restoration. Class activities will include field exercises in the La Crosse region, mathematical analysis of hydrologic variables, and spatial analysis with Geographic Information Systems. Prerequisite: ESC 221 or ESC 222. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO, may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 540 Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photographs Systematic applications of aerial photographs in the interpretation and analysis of geographic problems. Emphasis is placed on digital photograph interpretation within a geographic information system. Topics include urban and rural land use, natural resource, and environmental assessment. Lect.2, Lab 2. Prerequisite: ESC/GEO 385. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 545 Advanced Remote Sensing Advanced techniques of digital satellite and airborne image analysis and processing, emphasizing theory and applications in natural resource, land use and environmental assessment. Includes practical approaches to integrating imagery with geographic information systems area for spatial analyses and decision making. Data acquisition, integrity, manipulation, formatting, storage, and retrieval are also examined. Prerequisite: ESC/GEO 345. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO: may only earn credit in one department.)
MIC 534 Aquatic Microbial Ecology An ecological study of bacteria, cyanobacteria and algae of aquatic ecosystems. Topics include microbial strategies for survival under various environmental conditions, the role of microorganisms in biogeochemical cycling of elements, interactions of microorganisms with other aquatic biota, the role of microorganisms in pollution problems, and applications of microbial ecology to biotechnology. Laboratory emphasis is on experimental design and sampling techniques, quantification of microbial biomass, and measurement of microbial activities in aquatic habitats. One weekend field trip required. Lect. 2, Lab. 3. Prerequisite: MIC 230 and three semesters of college chemistry; BIO 341 strongly recommended.
MIC 542 Plant Microbe Interactions This course will explore in-depth various ways that plants interact with microbes in the environment, at the macroscopic, cellular, and molecular levels. Case studies will include both parasitic and mutualistic (symbiotic) interactions. Microbes include fungi, bacteria, nematodes, and viruses. Includes plant pathology and studies of the beneficial relationships between plants and microbes. Inquiry-based labs are integrated into the lecture and discussion sessions. Lect. 2, Lab 2. Prerequisite: BIO 203 or BIO 204, MIC 230 and BIO 306 or MIC 416. (Cross-listed with BIO/MIC; may only earn credit in one department.)
PTS 741 Evidenced Based Practice in Physical Therapy This course is intended to provide the learner with strategies to evaluate the evidence underlying physical therapy practice. Learners will utilize this evidence as a framework for determining best practice. Evidence based strategies include analysis of outcome measures used in physical therapy, interpretation and analysis of clinical prediction rules, and conducting focused systematic reviews of physical therapy interventions.