Undergraduate Sustainability-related courses

Courses With a Prominent Sustainability-Focused Theme 

ANT 266 Anthropology of Food Cross-cultural practices and beliefs about the production, consumption, and distribution of food vary widely. This course examines food in a historical, social, and cultural context, focusing on the topics such as subsistence patterns and cultural patterns of food preparation and consumption; contemporary diets and the increasing prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease; cultural practices that restrict food intake or dictate food taboos; the globalization and 'McDonaldization' of food; and others. The goal of the course is to provide students with theoretical and methodological tools to analyze food as a symbolic, political, and cultural artifact in today's world.
BIO 441 Environmental Toxicology The study of the lethal and sublethal effects of chemical contaminants on ecosystems and humans. Topics covered include environmental legislation, chemical distribution and fate in the environment, methods of toxicity testing, assessment of exposure and risk, effects of chemical contaminants on humans, and fish and wildlife populations, communities and ecosystems, and toxicity of specific chemical groups.
BUS 310 Principles of Sustainable Business This course lays a foundation on the relationships between social, environmental and business systems. Challenges to existing business theory will embrace a new ecological perspective of business that includes an introduction to complexity theory, systems thinking, evolutionary economics and biomimicry. The specific topics of the triple-bottom-line, full-cost accounting, green marketing, human rights and social equity are explored within the context of local and global ecosystems and a broadened mission for 'sustainable' business in the 21st century.
BUS 350 Career Preparation This course prepares students to change from the academic environment to the professional environment. Topics include self-assessment, preparing for interviews, written and oral communication in a career search, electronic resources, and graduate school opportunities. Prerequisite: admission to business. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Fall, Spring.
BUS 450 Business Sustainability Capstone This capstone course will act as a culmination of the Sustainability Minor in Business. By the time students complete this last course in the minor, they will have developed not only a deep exposure to the 'content' of sustainable business, but also a great deal of firsthand experience with the very tools and procedures that breathe factual 'life' into that content, including the triple-bottom-line, full-cost accounting, externalities, and ecological footprint audits. Speakers from and field trips to businesses engaging in sustainability practices will also be a part of this course. Open only to minors in sustainable business.
CHE 200 Public Health for the Educated Citizen This course introduces the context and scope of public health from historical, modern, and postmodern perspectives. Historical perspective will be used to explain the philosophical foundations, ethics, methods, and essential services that make up public health. Modern perspectives will be used to explain a century of controlling communicable diseases, lengthening lives, and the emergence of new challenges. A postmodern perspective will be used to explore persistent health disparities, social determinants of health, and public health in an era of globalization. Participants will be challenged to consider their role in public health as citizens and/or professionals in a free society.
CHE 440 Program Development in Community Health Education Community health analysis specific to community health education program development. Individual students develop knowledge of the following program development components: (1) needs, (2) objectives, (3) learning activities, (4) settings, (5) evaluation. Skills are developed in program planning and program implementing. Two hours for in-class activities are complemented by out-of-class program development experience.
ECO 346 Environmental and Ecological Economics Aspects of the scarcity of renewable and non-renewable natural resources and the management problems associated with their allocation and use are presented from neoclassical and ecological economics perspective. The theoretical foundations for those tools of economic analysis applicable to the analysis of natural resource problems are developed with historical, real-world examples discussed. Attention is concentrated on the policy implications of alternative resource development strategies.
ENV 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies An interdisciplinary, introductory seminar which will explore current environmental issues from a variety of perspectives (scientific, historical, and social) and disciplines (natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities). Attitudes toward the natural world and approaches to public and private decision-making will also be examined. Some field trips will be used to examine local and regional practices and issues.
ENV 301 Environmental Sustainability What can we do as individuals and as a society to meet our own needs without harming future generations?  This seminar course approaches sustainability as a way of asking better questions, drawing from many academic disciplines and practical experiences.  Students will discuss environmental sustainability for multiple scales, including personal lifestyles, organizations, businesses, and public infrastructure systems.
ENV 303 Issues in Environmental Studies This fully interdisciplinary seminar provides the opportunity to gain understanding of the scientific, historical, and ethical issues in ecological literacy and environmental responsibility by focusing on a specific environmental concern. Selected environmental issues with a specific focus will be offered. Examples are forestry, ground water, air pollution, ozone depletion, sustainable agriculture, overpopulation. Each offering will have a specific title according to the topic. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6.
ENV 450 Internship in Environmental Studies Direct work experience with an agency or organization that deals with environmental issues or problems from an interdisciplinary perspective. The student works under supervision of both faculty adviser and agency staff member. Examples of sites include governmental agencies, advocacy groups, environmental education centers, alternative technologies companies, and environmental compliance divisions of corporations. All internships must be approved in the semester prior to the semester that the internship occurs.
ENV 496 Integrative Seminar in Environmental Studies This capstone course, offered in seminar style, will focus on research and responsible environmental action. It will discuss, review, and assess course work done in the environmental studies minor. Students will evaluate previous course work and design and conduct research projects or other environmental projects/activities. This seminar will be oriented toward integration of various aspects of the minor, within the context of a bioregional emphasis, a focus on environmental issues on campus, and a component aimed at environmental action. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6.
ENV 499 Independent Study in Environmental Studies Under supervision of instructor, individualized study in environmental studies on issues/topics not available in existing courses. All independent studies must be approved in the semester prior to the semester that the independent study occurs. Repeatable for credit - maximum 3.
ERS 363 American Indians and the Environment This course introduces students to American Indian environmental issues. Topics include treaty-based hunting, fishing and gathering rights, air and water quality regulatory authority, environmental racism, toxic and nuclear waste disposal on Indian lands, mining and hydroelectric dams, sacred sites, and Indian vs. Western perceptions of the environment. Special attention will be given to current environmental controversies in Wisconsin Indian country.
ESC 211 Global Warming and Climate Change This course explores the scientific basis of global warming and climate change, and their current and likely impacts on human society and the environment, before addressing the action that could be taken by governments, by industry, and by individuals to mitigate the effect. Discussion of global warming is situated in the context of models of climate change, focusing on alternative interpretations of the effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on global warming
ESC 460 Environmental Hazards and Land Use Environmental processes are investigated in light of the hazards they might pose for development and how they may be avoided or mitigated by proper land use planning.
GEO 200 Conservation of Global Environments Introduction to natural resources, resource management, environmental and land use ethics, environmental impacts of resource utilization and strategies to resolve environmental conflicts. Course examines the relationships between society and the environment from the global to the local scale.
GEO 460 Environmental Hazards and Land Use Environmental processes are investigated in light of the hazards they might pose for development and how they may be avoided or mitigated by proper land use planning.
HED 335 Human Ecology and Environmental Health This course examines the interdisciplinary and global effects of human-environment relationships. Emphasis is placed on the critical nature of the relationship between ecosystem health and human health and well-being. Environmental politics and economics, global disease, and traditional environmental health topics are considered for the purpose of improving the quality of life for all people through the creation of a sustainable society.
HIS 317 American Environmental History This course studies human societies and their changing relationships with their physical and natural surroundings. The focus is on the environmental history of North America from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics explored may include the Columbian exchange, evolving concepts of humanity's relationship to nature, the development of a market economy, science and technology, government roles in conservation and preservation, and the recent emergence of an environmental movement.
HIS 379 African Environmental History This course examines how African environmental realities and Africans' conceptions of the environment shaped broader political, social and economic histories.  It specifically addresses how 19th century economies, colonial policies, and post-independence priorities transformed Africans' relationships with their environments.
HIS 391 History of Environmental Policy in the United States This course explores the history of environmental issues in the United States by examining several case studies in contemporary policy from a historical perspective. Special emphasis is placed upon the skills of using historical evidence as a component of policy analysis. This course approaches environmental concerns by examining both their history and the political considerations underlying their creation and disposition. We seek to uncover and understand historical foundations and explanations for particularly contentious or intractable debates in environmental politics.
MGT 400  Management Forum Emphasis will be on examination and study of current management issues. Topics will vary from semester to semester.  Specific forum topics with sustainability as a main focus are: Green Operations and System Thinking and Change at Work.
MGT 408 The Global Responsibility of Business This course considers the turbulent environment in which organizations function and examines specific dimensions of this environment including the evolution of a framework of global human rights, the impacts of economic and social globalization, the convergence of global approaches to sustainability and the changing ideological and political frameworks affecting business. It will also examine matters of global corporate social responsibility and social entrepreneurship.
MKT 351 Sustainability in Marketing This course addresses ecological issues facing society and modern marketing professionals. Course discussion will include green marketing, environmental responsibility, consumer attitudes and consumption, and providing value to customers via sustainable marketing strategies.
PHL 425 Wilderness Philosophy The intention of this course is to investigate the many different ways in which wilderness is defined and understood within environmental philosophy. The approach will be broad and will cover a variety of themes. Our desire is both to clarify the positive characteristics of the wilderness idea while also recognizing its significant flaws and hazards. The moral implications of the wilderness concept will be given special attention. A variety of different philosophical perspectives will be utilized.
PSY 302 Environmental Issues: Applied Psychology This course is an exploration of psychological perspectives on environmental issues. Two trends associated with the relationship between human attitudes and behavior and the natural and built environments will be examined. First, the course will focus on what psychology has to offer in terms of explaining how attitudes and behaviors have contributed to the degradation of the natural environment. Second, it will focus on the synergistic relation between person and planetary well-being characteristic of the "green psychology" movement.
REC 306 Environmental Ethics, Outdoor Recreation and Natural Resources This course provides an overview of the natural resources used for outdoor recreational pursuits, an analysis of leisure activities dependent upon natural resources, a presentation of the problems of recreational land use and an introduction to environmental awareness and outdoor safety. Recreation and natural resources at the national, state, local and private levels will be addressed with emphasis on the understanding of how outdoor recreation affects and is affected by natural resources. 
SOC 328 Environmental Sociology Environmental Sociology provides a framework for understanding the role of physical-biological factors in shaping social structures and behaviors as well as the impact of social organization and social change on the natural environment. This course will focus on the conflicts between the logic of economic growth and the realities of both the global environment and social justice within and between societies.
SOC 363 American Indians and the Environment This course introduces students to American Indian environmental issues. Topics include treaty-based hunting, fishing and gathering rights, air and water quality regulatory authority, environmental racism, toxic and nuclear waste disposal on Indian lands, mining and hydroelectric dams, sacred sites, and Indian vs. Western perceptions of the environment. Special attention will be given to current environmental controversies in Wisconsin Indian country.
WGS 390 Social Justice Research Methods This course answers the question that most caring people want answered: How can we fix this problem? Students will engage in the process of strategizing, whatever the issue (gender bias, racism, homophobia, environmental degradation, disability bias), and whatever the setting (a workplace, neighborhood, campus, or beyond). Course activities organize around the processes behind social change: strategic analysis, organizing, action planning, and evaluation, developing students' ability to create the knowledge necessary for complex problem-solving. Students learn and use the quantitative, qualitative, and critical research methods necessary to inform decisions at each step along a generalized pathway to change. Students going on to graduate school and students entering the workforce in a variety of fields like social work, community organizing, communication, and management will benefit from this course.

Sustainability-Related Courses 

ANT 101 Human Nature / Human Culture  This course provides an overview of the four subfields of anthropology: physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. The course will focus on how anthropologists seek to understand what it means to be human by examining how people are biologically, culturally, and socially similar and different around the world. We will cover multiple aspects of the human experience, including human evolution and biological diversity, primates and hominids, domestication and subsistence practices, marriage systems, sex and gender norms, religious beliefs, and linguistic diversity.
ANT 102 Introduction to Physical Anthropology This course introduces the basic fields of physical anthropology: population genetics, human osteology, primatology, pale anthropology, and forensics. The class provides a substantive framework for learning about the biological diversity of the human species through scientific inquiry. The foundations of evolutionary theory and the fossil evidence for human evolution are also presented. Lect. 3, Lab. 2.
ANT 202 Contemporary Global Issues This course will offer a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the Global Society as it enters the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern Global Society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science and history.
ANT 304 Hunter and Gatherer Societies This course focuses on recent human societies throughout the world that have lived by hunting and gathering wild resources. The specific subsistence strategies of a wide range of hunter-gatherer groups are examined relative to their technology, social structure, territory, demography and interaction with food producers. The conclusion of this course will consider hunter-gatherers in prehistory.
ANT 305 Indigenous Agricultural Societies: Past & Present This course examines the origins, structure, social organization, and operation of indigenous agricultural societies. A central focus of the course is an inquiry based, sequential examination of geographically related couplets involving (1) contemporary indigenous agricultural tribal societies and (2) archaeological excavation reports. The utility of the ethnographic record as a guide to interpretation of the archaeological record is evaluated.
ANT 307 International Development and Culture Change This course provides students with an overview of socio-cultural theories of international development and culture change. The course examines the cultural construction of 'development' as a product of the colonial era, the Cold War, and what has been called the neoliberal global economy. The goal of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive study of the strengths and limitations of contemporary development theory and method in anthropology and sociology, including such topics as conservation and the environment, indigenous peoples, gender and development, and the role of social movements and non-governmental organizations in the developmental process.
ANT 330 Pastoralism: Past and Present Mobile pastoralism is a way of life centered on the management and herding of livestock. It has had a powerful impact on social and environmental landscapes since originating independently in various forms throughout the world, and tens of millions of people throughout the world still rely on cattle and other domesticated animals for survival today. This course will explore the archaeology and anthropology of pastoralist societies, focusing on the ecological, political, and cultural strategies that made pastoralism dynamic and sustainable throughout prehistory and into the current era.  (Cross-listed with ARC/ANT, may only earn credit in one department.)
ANT 353  Maya Civilization The course presents an overview of the Maya culture located in southern Mexico and Central America. The class is organized chronologically into several sections that focus on the origins, adaptations to various environments, social, political, and religious organizations, and the belief systems of the Maya beginning at around 3000 BC. Emphasis will be on Pre-Hispanic Maya; will also explore life ways of contemporary Maya people. (Cross-listed with ANT/ARC/HIS, may only earn credit in one department.)
ANT 360 Peoples and Cultures of Africa An analysis of cultural impact of catastrophic events in human societies - natural and human-engineered disasters. Various dramatic upheavals will be explored across time and cultures as the class examines human and environmental traumas to which societies must adapt, the cultural interpretations/response which follow, and the manner in which major disasters have redefined and redirected the character and probable future history of each damaged, even endangered society. Study cases will include volcanic and weather cataclysms, plagues and associated population crashes, environmental catastrophes, as well as war, terrorism, and bio-terrorism.
ANT 370 Medical Anthropology Using international examples, this course provides an overview of concepts and theories in medical anthropology and examines how an individual's interactions with the social and physical environment influence the experience of health and illness. The course focuses on medical anthropology as a subfield of anthropology, discussing specific global health issues such as cultural beliefs and practices of health and healing; complementary and alternative medicine in the U.S.; the effects of race, ethnicity, gender, and class on health status; medicine and power; HIV/AIDS, bioethics and biotechnology; and, the application of medical anthropology in international and domestic settings.
ANT 373 The Sky in Human Cultures The Sky in Human Cultures examines how ancient peoples analyzed their skies, how they interpreted and applied the results of their observations, and what roles their considerable sky knowledge played in their lives and societies. While the course draws on some modern astronomical observation and calculation, this class relies primarily on anthropology and archaeology to explore the intimate relationships ancient peoples developed with this important feature of their environments.
ARC 195  Archaeology: An Introduction to the Science of Archaeology An introductory course for archaeology majors. Methods and techniques for the recovery and interpretation of archaeological evidence are examined as well as the role of archaeology in modeling past human behavior and environments. Breakout sessions include exposure to and interpretation of material culture, field and lab methods, use of classification systems, and examination of prehistoric technologies such as stone tools and pottery.
ARC 200 World Archaeology: Origins and Development of Human Culture and Society A survey course which examines the origin and development of human cultures from earliest Paleolithic times to the great ancient civilizations. An emphasis will be placed on how these evolutionary developments represent changing patterns of human adaptation to the social and natural environment. 
ARC 304 Hunter and Gatherer Societies This course focuses on recent human societies throughout the world that have lived by hunting and gathering wild resources. The specific subsistence strategies of a wide range of hunter-gatherer groups are examined relative to their technology, social structure, territory, demography and interaction with food producers. The conclusion of this course will consider hunter-gatherers in prehistory.
ARC 305 Indigenous Agricultural Societies: Past & Present This course examines the origins, structure, social organization, and operation of indigenous agricultural societies. A central focus of the course is an inquiry based, sequential examination of geographically related couplets involving (1) contemporary indigenous agricultural tribal societies and (2) archaeological excavation reports. The utility of the ethnographic record as a guide to interpretation of the archaeological record is evaluated.
ARC 330 Pastoralism: Past and Present Mobile pastoralism is a way of life centered on the management and herding of livestock. It has had a powerful impact on social and environmental landscapes since originating independently in various forms throughout the world, and tens of millions of people throughout the world still rely on cattle and other domesticated animals for survival today. This course will explore the archaeology and anthropology of pastoralist societies, focusing on the ecological, political, and cultural strategies that made pastoralism dynamic and sustainable throughout prehistory and into the current era.  (Cross-listed with ARC/ANT, may only earn credit in one department.)
ARC 340 Origins of Cities This course examines the origins and development of urban life. Students will first explore, from an anthropological perspective, the character of modern cities. Students will next examine the earliest cities in the Old and New Worlds, and comparatively explore the varied ecological, social, political, and demographic processes associated with urbanization in various ancient civilizations (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus Valley, China, Andes, and Mesoamerica). While the focus of this course is on archaeological cities, it draws heavily on ethnographic and sociological studies of urban forms. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a comparative understanding and appreciation of urban life and its long history. (Cross-listed with ARC/HIS; may only earn credit in one department.)
ARC 353 Maya Civilization The course presents an overview of the Maya culture located in southern Mexico and Central America. The class is organized chronologically into several sections that focus on the origins, adaptations to various environments, social, political, and religious organizations, and the belief systems of the Maya beginning at around 3000 BC. Emphasis will be on Pre-Hispanic Maya; will also explore life ways of contemporary Maya people. (Cross-listed with ANT/ARC/HIS, may only earn credit in one department.)
ARC 373 The Sky in Human Cultures The Sky in Human Cultures examines how ancient peoples analyzed their skies, how they interpreted and applied the results of their observations, and what roles their considerable sky knowledge played in their lives and societies. While the course draws on some modern astronomical observation and calculation, this class relies primarily on anthropology and archaeology to explore the intimate relationships ancient peoples developed with this important feature of their environments.he S
ARC 404 Environmental Archaeology This course investigates the relationship between prehistoric human societies and their biotic communities. An array of techniques using plant and animal remains from archaeological contexts to reconstruct aspects of ancient environments, climates, and human subsistence patterns are examined. Applications of environmental data toward the understanding of human settlement and subsistence systems are discussed.This course investigates the relationship between prehistoric human societies and their biotic communities. An array of techniques using plant and animal remains from archaeological contexts to reconstruct aspects of ancient environments, climates, and human subsistence patterns are examined. Applications of environmental data toward the understanding of human settlement and subsistence systems are discussed.
ARC 492 Archaeology Analysis Procedures for Teachers Taking a hands-on approach to analyzing and interpreting archaeological remains, the class will integrate lectures with demonstrations, experiments, and supervised laboratory projects. Study will focus on the potential for interpreting human life ways and adaptations to the environment from stone tools, ceramics, floral, and faunal remains. Practical application of the interpretation process will be related to the classroom of the precollegiate instructor. Introduction will provide an overview of field procedures.
BIO 102 Contemporary Issues in Biological Sciences An intra-disciplinary approach to investigating current issues within the biological sciences. Specific topics under the general categories of health, medicine, environment, genetics, and industrial technology will be identified, described and characterized. The science underlying the issue will be explored and the potential impact (past and future) of applied scientific advances within the respective disciplines will be examined in depth. Not applicable to a major or minor in biology.
BIO 103 Introductory Biology A survey of modern biology. Subjects discussed include ecology, cell biology and genetics. Themes developed through the course are the use of the scientific method and the relationships between society, technology and science. This course is designed as a general education course for non-science or non-allied health majors. Lect. 3, Lab 2.
BIO 105 General Biology An introduction to biology including topics in ecology, population biology, nutrient cycling, food webs, cell structure and function, metabolism, photosynthesis, reproduction, genetics, molecular biology and evolution. This course provides a strong foundation for further science courses, and is designed for science majors, allied health majors and students with an interest in science. Lect. 3, Lab. 2.
BIO 203 Organismal Biology A survey of the diverse form and function of prokaryotes, protistans, fungi, plants and animals. Basic ecology, natural history, evolution, biogeography and importance of organisms to humans will be emphasized. Lect. 3, Lab. 3.
BIO 304  Plant Biology Plant Biology is a phylogenetic survey of the plant-like protists and organisms in the plant kingdom beginning with single celled organisms and ending with flowering plants. Innovation of form and function of each major plant group will be discussed along with their anatomy, morphology, taxonomy, ecology, natural history, distribution, medical and economic importance to humans and natural ecosystems. Lect. 2, Lab. 2
BIO 307 Ecology A study of interactions that determine the distribution and abundance of living organisms.  The basic principles of ecology are presented in order to develop an understanding of the nature of these interactions at the individual, population and community levels of biological organization. 
BIO 321 Ornithology Field identification and ecology of birds with emphasis on Wisconsin forms. Lect. 2, Lab. 3.
BIO 330 Economic Botany Plants provide humans with food, feed, fuel, fiber, pharmaceuticals, and other economically important products. This course provides an introduction to domesticated plant varieties and wild plant species and their value in human and domestic animal nutrition, and as energy sources, manufactured materials and drugs. Ethnobotanical interests in wild plant species will also be discussed.
BIO 341 Limnology This course includes fundamentals of aquatic ecology, with special reference to community ecology. Taxonomy, stratification and succession of organisms to be investigated. Energy traffic through aquatic ecosystems will also be investigated. Field trips required. Lect. 2, Lab. 3.
BIO 405  Aquatic and Wetland Vascular Plants Identification and collection of vascular plants of aquatic and marsh habitats with emphasis on adaptive morphology and ecology of local species. Field trips required. Lect. 1, Lab. 2.
BIO 406 Parasitology A survey of the major groups of animal parasites with regard to their taxonomy, morphology, life histories, host-parasite relationships, and economic importance. Lect. 2, Lab 4.
BIO 412 Mycology A survey of all the major groups of fungi of the fungal kingdom (and relatives) in terms of systematics, anatomy, morphology, ecology, physiology, genetics, evolutionary relationships, and human and plant pathology. Laboratory includes microscopic and macroscopic study of the fungi, as well as making a collection of cultures and of fungal reproductive structures (including mushrooms) from selected groups. Lect. 2, Lab 4.
BIO 414 Freshwater Invertebrate Zoology Introduces the ecology and taxonomy of the metazoan, non–parasitic freshwater invertebrates. An extensive course designed to provide a foundation for taxonomic knowledge, and basic understanding of the biology and ecology of freshwater invertebrates for advanced students in aquatic and environmental sciences. Lectures will focus on ecology; labs on taxonomy and quantitative skills. A student reference collection and field trips will be required. Lect. 2, Lab. 2.
BIO 419 Quantitative Methods in Ecology An introduction to field and laboratory procedures used by ecologists to describe and analyze the interactions between organisms and their environments. The course will emphasize quantitative techniques, including the use of computer technology, for collecting, recording and interpreting ecological data. Lect. 2, Lab. 2.
BIO 422 Ichthyology A study of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of fish, with emphasis on the fresh water fishes. Lect. 2, Lab. 2.
BIO 442  Plant Microbe Interactions This course will explore in depth various ways that plants interact with microbes in the environment, at the macroscopic, cellular, and molecular levels. Case studies will include both parasitic and mutualistic (symbiotic) interactions. Microbes include fungi, bacteria, nematodes, and viruses. Includes plant pathology and studies of the beneficial relationships between plants and microbes. Inquiry based labs are integrated into the lecture and discussion sessions. Lect. 2, Lab 2.
BIO 447 Standard Methods\Quality Assurance Water Analyses This course will instruct students on the use of standard methods for analyses of selected biological, chemical, and physical constituents commonly included in water quality analyses. Quality assurance procedures, including Good Laboratory Practice Standards (GLPS) will be integrated into all activities. Materials covered include: principles of methods used; evaluation of precision, bias, and contamination; proper reporting and interpretation of results; and environmental sources and significance of constituents analyzed. Lect. 1, Lab 4.
BIO 448 Aquatic Toxicology A study of the lethal and sublethal effects of chemical contaminants in aquatic systems, specific chemical effects, chemical distribution and fate, and environmental legislation. Procedures for toxicity evaluation, experimental design and statistical analysis will be emphasized in the laboratory. Lect. 3, Lab 2.
BIO 456 Plant Ecology Conservation biology, ecological restoration, and predicting the effects of climate change all require an understanding of plant ecology. This course is focused on the interactions among plants, other organisms, and the environment. We will work across the individual, population, and community levels, and emphasize an exploratory approach to plant ecology. Class activities will include lectures, the discussion of ecological journal articles, and carrying out student-designed experiments.
BIO 463 Symposium in Biology The study of pathogens of aquatic animals, including fish, shellfish, crustaceans, amphibians, waterfowl and mammals. Sections on nutrition and toxicology are included. Emphasis is on laboratory techniques for isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria, viruses and parasites. Field trips required. Lect. 2, Lab 3.
BIO 464 Stream and Watershed Ecology An introduction to key concepts and theory pertinent to understanding and managing fluvial ecosystems (rivers and streams) and their watersheds. The course emphasizes rivers as large-scale physical and biological systems. Course work includes a comparative case study of distinctive types of temperate, tropical, and polar rivers.
BIO 473  Marine Biology Marine biology is an interdisciplinary field that includes elements of geology, physics, chemistry and biology.  Students will gain an introduction to how biological organisms deal with varying physical, geological and chemical conditions found in marine ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on current conservation concerns and marine invertebrate diversity.
BIO 476 Ecosystem Ecology Ecosystems include the living and non-living components of an environmental system and have emergent properties that can only be understood by examining the system as a whole.  This course will examine advanced ecological topics centered around the structure and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.  Topics covered will include the development of the ecosystem concept, ecosystem succession, production/decomposition, energy transfer in food webs, and nutrient cycling.  The course will consist of classroom lectures, problem sets, and reading/discussion of relevant literature.
BUS 205 The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business This course introduces students to ethical theory and decision-making models, as well as the legal framework in which American business operates, the substantive legal rules that govern American business domestically and internationally, and the ethical and social responsibility implications of business conduct within the legal environment. Governmental efforts to regulate business activity by statute and administrative agency rules and decisions are emphasized.
CHE 204  Introduction to Global Health This course introduces participants to global health through its history, definition, determinants, and development as a field of study. The inter-connection between health problems in developed and developing countries and the interdisciplinary approach necessary to understand and address health problems and issues will be emphasized. The participant will develop a basic understanding of the methods used to assess population health, understand the current and future distribution of health, and be able to discuss why some populations are healthier than others and what can be done to reduce health disparities.
CHE 340 Epidemiology and Community Health Problems A survey and analysis of current public health problems incorporating an epidemiologic framework. A basic introduction to community health history and organization is followed by specific health issues analyzed through the agent, host, and environmental interrelationships. Primary, secondary and tertiary prevention, and health promotion strategies are detailed.
CHM 412 Environmental Chemistry This course examines the role of chemistry in shaping our environment, including atmospheric, aqueous, and terrestrial components. Students learn how fundamental chemical principles are applied to complex real systems in order to characterize environmental behavior and aid in prediction and decision making. Specific topics explored include climate change, ozone depletion, smog formation, water quality and treatment, energy policy, and the fate/transport of pollutants.
CHM 461  Nuclear Chemistry  A study of the decay of radioactive nuclides with emphasis on the theory of nuclear decay. Laboratory will include the study of the detection of radiation, methods of radio analysis and the safe handling of unsealed radioactive sources. Lect. 3, Lab 3.
CI 381 Environmental Education Methods This course is designed to develop an understanding of curricula, instructional methods and materials and evaluation techniques for K-12 level environmental education based upon educational research, contemporary practices and Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction recommended goals and expectations.
CST 271  Contemporary Media in Everyday Life This course offers an opportunity to explore contemporary media and their economic, social, political, and cultural implications in everyday life. This course will increase awareness of the motivations of media coverage, media effects on social and cultural change as well as on audience attitudes, the importance of social and cultural issues created or sustained by the media, and the necessity of a critical attitude while consuming media messages.
ECO 110  Microeconomics and Public Policy Introduction to microeconomic principals and their application to decision-making by individuals, businesses, and government. General topics include supply and demand, market structures, product markets, government regulation, income distribution, international trade, and economic analysis of current social issues.
ECO 120 Global Macroeconomics Introduction to the functioning of the world economy. Applications of economic principals to domestic and international problems with an introduction to economic systems, economic thought, and economic history around the world. General topics include the economics of international exchange rates, global macroeconomics, international monetary systems, and economic development.
ECO 202 Contemporary Global Issues This course will offer a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the global society as it enters the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern global society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science and history. (Cross-listed with ANT/ECO/GEO/HIS/POL/SOC 202; may only earn credit in one department.)
EDS 309 Education in a Global Society (Early Adolescence-Adolescence) In support of teachers as globally responsive citizens, this course studies international education issues relating to global poverty, gender inequality and the impact of globalization on the teaching profession. Comparative case studies regarding education systems in other parts of the world are integrated to provide a stronger global perspective on social, economic and political aspects of schooling.i
ENG 334 Language Study for Teachers Designed for pre-service teachers, this course is intended to provide a theoretical base for structuring effective language education, for teaching writing and other language activities, and for understanding linguistic diversity. It will cover issues basic to understanding how language acquisition is a developmental process and how language functions in thinking, learning, and social interaction. 
ENG 445 Literature and Environmental Action A study of literature of many genres written by nature and environmentalist writers, both traditional and contemporary, all serving as models for students’ essays and projects.
ERS 253 Introduction to Wisconsin Indians An introductory examination of Wisconsin Indians with specific reference to the Ho-Chunk, Menominee, Ojibwa, Oneida, Potawatomi, and the Stockbridge-Munsee communities. An interdisciplinary approach will be used to explore topics including sovereignty, land use and environmental issues, education, economic development, social issues and challenges, and tribal identity. The course also will explore each tribe’s responses to both state and federal governments.
ERS 415 Multicultural Counseling This course focuses on the effects of culture on the nature and behavior of individuals, their adaptations to institutions and environments, and their relations within and outside their culture. Specifically, the impact of concepts such as ethnocentrism, stereotypes, racism and prejudice are explored in terms of their relevance to the counseling process. Counseling strategies and skills relevant to providing effective multicultural counseling are investigated.
ERS 442 Racism and Oppression This course focuses on psychological theory and research regarding individual, group, historical, institutional, and societal causes of racism and oppression. The manifestations and consequences of racism and oppression are examined as are the challenges inherent in reducing racism and oppression. Both historical and contemporary racism and oppression in a global context are analyzed.
ESC 101 Earth Environments This course concentrates on understanding the earth’s dynamic environments through the study of processes and physical and human interactions related to the lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. A scientific approach is used to examine fundamental concepts in earth and environmental science related to topics such as plate tectonics, landform development, atmospheric processes, global climate, and water resources, in order to provide an understanding of how the earth system functions and the human role in these phenomena. Lect. 3, Lab 2.
ESC 221 Introduction to Climate Systems An introduction to physical principles and the dynamic processes that govern the behavior of the atmosphere at global and regional scales. Spatial and temporal variations of energy, moisture, circulation, and weather systems; and the patterns of the world climate systems are discussed. Lect. 3; Lab 2.
ESC 222 Landforms: Processes and Regions An introduction to the earth surface processes that are dominant in forming various types of landforms Spatial variations in landform will be studied both at the local scale and as the outcome of large-scale global processes, including the effects of plate tectonics and global climatic change. Lect. 3, Lab 2.
ESC 345 Remote Sensing Introduction to remote sensing, emphasizing satellite multispectral observations of the earth applied to such fields as agriculture, forestry, water resources, urban and regional planning, and environmental assessment. Upper Midwest and selected areas worldwide are explored with visual and digital image processing techniques.  (Cross listed with ESC/GEO, may only earn credit in one department.)
ESC 385 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems An introduction to both theoretical and applied aspects of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). GIS software, with an emphasis on ArcGIS, will be used to explore geographic questions. Hands-on exercises pertaining to environmental science, natural resource management, business, and urban planning will be used to complement lecture material. Topics will include data organization, database structure, input and output, data quality, and geographic analysis of spatial and attribute data. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.) 
ESC 390 Geographic Field Methods Covers fundamental concepts of field methods as applied to physical, cultural, urban and environmental geography. Students will gain experience in sampling, field surveying, GPS mapping, and observational data collection techniques. Includes reconnaissance and detailed surveys using current methods, GPS and field equipment; and practical integration of field data into a geographic information system. 
ESC 422 Meteorology and Weather Forecasting Various principles and laws which govern the behavior of the atmosphere are investigated. Laws of gases and radiation, energy exchange between the earth and the atmosphere, laws of motion, various forces governing atmospheric motion, atmospheric moisture and psychrometry, condensation, preciptable water and precipitation, atmospheric stability/instability, thermodynamic characteristics of the atmosphere, vorticity, and synoptic meteorology are discussed. Surface and upper-air charts, synoptic patterns, thermodynamic charts, radar and satellite images, and weather patterns are analyzed for weather forecasting.
ESC 425 Biogeography A systematic analysis of the geographic distribution of organisms from historical, ecological and regional perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the principles and the methods of biogeography. Special reference is made to bio-geographic regions, the distribution of organisms in space and time, and ecological biogeography.
ESC 426 Soil Morphology and Genesis A comprehensive study of soils around the world and the factors and processes that drive their formation and dynamic evolution. Emphasis is placed on soil morphology, pedogenesis, and biogeochemical influences within the soil environment. A one-credit lab section is devoted to the hands-on exploration and study of soils through laboratory and field exercises.
ESC 427 Water Resources A study of physical water resources systems and management and utilization of water as a resource. Class activities will include seminars on critical water resource management issues and hands-on analysis of pertinent data, including exercises in Geographic Information Systems.
ESC 430 Fluvial Geomorphology A systematic study of the interactions between flowing water and surface landforms.  Emphasis is placed on watershed and stream development, sediment transport and storage, flow frequency analysis, and applications of fluvial principles to river management and stream restoration.  Class activities will include field exercises in the La Crosse region, mathematical analysis of hydrologic variables, and spatial analysis with Geographic Information Systems.
ESC 440 Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photographs Systematic applications of aerial photographs in the interpretation and analysis of geographic problems. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of digital photographs within a geographic information system. Topics include urban and rural land use, natural resource, and environmental assessment. Lect.2, Lab 2.
ESC 445 Advanced Remote Sensing Advanced techniques of digital satellite and airborne image analysis and processing, emphasizing theory and applications in natural resource, land use and environmental assessment. Includes practical approaches to integrating imagery with geographic information systems for spatial analyses and decision making. Data acquisition, integrity, manipulation, formatting, storage, and retrieval are also examined.
ESS 344 Introduction to Fitness Assessment The purpose of this course is to review the clinical and diagnostic approach to cardiovascular anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology, and to provide basic knowledge in evaluation, methodology and interpretation of fitness testing. Areas of emphasis will be population characteristics, participant screening and referral process, alternatives of fitness assessment and exercise prescription. Lect. 2, Lab 2.
ESS 368 Strength Training Techniques and Programs This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of proper lifting and spotting technique, an understanding of the various types of equipment and modes of strength training, basic program design and programming for special populations, and weight training for competition. Students will be taught to design and individualize a strength training program.
ESS 403 Advanced Strength Training Applications and Techniques This course presents advanced strength training and conditioning theory and practice. Designed primarily for students specializing in strength and conditioning, the course explores advanced periodization models and their utilization, mastery and analysis of Olympic lifts, plyometric programming, ergogenic aids (identification, legal implications, nutritional alternatives,) facility design, and special population needs.
ESS 411 Strength and Conditioning Educator Training This course is a capstone experience for students specializing in strength and conditioning. Content includes exercise physiology and biomechanics, nutrition and ergogenic aids, testing and evaluation, exercise techniques, program design, and organization and administration of a strength and conditioning facility.
GEO 202 Contemporary Global Issues This course will offer a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the global society as it enters the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern global society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science, and history. (Cross-listed with ANT/ECO/GEO/HIS/POL/SOC 202; may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 306 Economic Geography This course introduces students to the global economic patterns which have shaped and conditioned the world of the 1990s, and the salient economic geography models and approaches which help to explain such patterns. Elements emphasized include the evolution of social and economic organization; the globalization of economic activity since the late 1400s; the interconnectivity of development and underdevelopment; and the relationship between development and social environmental problems.
GEO 318 The Geography of Latin America & the Caribbean The cultural and physical characteristics of Latin America and the Caribbean region are systematically examined and explained. This includes an examination of diverse physical and 'built' environments that encompass this region, from the borderlands of northern Mexico to the Tierra Del Fuego of the south; from the lush tropical environments of the Amazon, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico, to the Altiplano and arid regions of the west; from disparate lowlands to the startling mountain zones of the Andes. Indigenous civilizations which developed out of unique arrangements with these complex environments as well as those imposed and imported since 1500 will be explored in depth.
GEO 345 Remote Sensing Introduction to remote sensing, emphasizing satellite multispectral observations of the earth applied to such fields as agriculture, forestry, water resources, urban and regional planning, and environmental assessment. Upper Midwest and selected areas worldwide are explored with visual and digital image processing techniques.  (Cross listed with ESC/GEO, may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 385 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems An introduction to both theoretical and applied aspects of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). GIS software, with an emphasis on ArcGIS, will be used to explore geographic questions. Hands-on exercises pertaining to environmental science, natural resource management, business, and urban planning will be used to complement lecture material. Topics will include data organization, database structure, input and output, data quality, and geographic analysis of spatial and attribute data. (Cross-listed with ESC/GEO; may only earn credit in one department.)
GEO 390 Geographic Field Methods Covers fundamental concepts of field methods as applied to physical, cultural, urban and environmental geography. Students will gain experience in sampling, field surveying, GPS mapping, and observational data collection techniques. Includes reconnaissance and detailed surveys using current methods, GPS and field equipment; and practical integration of field data into a geographic information system.
GEO 422 Meteorology and Weather Forecasting Various principles and laws which govern the behavior of the atmosphere are investigated. Laws of gases and radiation, energy exchange between the earth and the atmosphere, laws of motion, various forces governing atmospheric motion, atmospheric moisture and psychrometry, condensation, preciptable water and precipitation, atmospheric stability/instability, thermodynamic characteristics of the atmosphere, vorticity, and synoptic meteorology are discussed. Surface and upper-air charts, synoptic patterns, thermodynamic charts, radar and satellite images, and weather patterns are analyzed for weather forecasting.
GEO 425 Biogeography A systematic analysis of the geographic distribution of organisms from historical, ecological and regional perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the principles and the methods of biogeography. Special reference is made to bio-geographic regions, the distribution of organisms in space and time, and ecological biogeography.
GEO 426 Soil Morphology and Genesis A comprehensive study of soils around the world and the factors and processes that drive their formation and dynamic evolution. Emphasis is placed on soil morphology, pedogenesis, and biogeochemical influences within the soil environment. A one-credit lab section is devoted to the hands-on exploration and study of soils through laboratory and field exercises.
GEO 427 Water Resources A study of physical water resources systems and management and utilization of water as a resource. Class activities will include seminars on critical water resource management issues and hands-on analysis of pertinent data, including exercises in Geographic Information Systems.
GEO 430 Fluvial Geomorphology A systematic study of the interactions between flowing water and surface landforms.  Emphasis is placed on watershed and stream development, sediment transport and storage, flow frequency analysis, and applications of fluvial principles to river management and stream restoration.  Class activities will include field exercises in the La Crosse region, mathematical analysis of hydrologic variables, and spatial analysis with Geographic Information Systems.
GEO 440 Geographic Interpretation of Aerial Photographs Systematic applications of aerial photographs in the interpretation and analysis of geographic problems. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of digital photographs within a geographic information system. Topics include urban and rural land use, natural resource, and environmental assessment. Lect.2, Lab 2.
GEO 445  Advanced Remote Sensing Advanced techniques of digital satellite and airborne image analysis and processing, emphasizing theory and applications in natural resource, land use and environmental assessment. Includes practical approaches to integrating imagery with geographic information systems for spatial analyses and decision making. Data acquisition, integrity, manipulation, formatting, storage, and retrieval are also examined.
HED 201 Social Justice and Peer Education This course both educates students on social justice issues they face while in college and prepares them to be able to give presentations to peers in residence halls, classrooms, athletic teams, and student organizations with the goal of effecting social change. Subject matter will respond to campus needs. Repeatable for credit - maximum three.
HIS 101  Global Origins of the Modern World This course explores the origins and development of the modern world, focusing on the dual dynamics of globalization and vital indigenous civilizations. The course will critically examine a minimum of three world civilizations, their ancient antecedents, and will include multiple themes, such as technology and science, religion, gender, war and peace, and the environment.
HIS 102 Global Transition and Change This course examines world history from the perspective of one specific theme, such as technology and science, religion, gender, cross-culture connections, war and peace, arts and literature, government, or the environment. The course is global in scope, covering a minimum of three world civilizations. Individual sections will trace the development of one theme over the course of major changes in world history, ancient origins to the present. Students will have their choice of sections, thus of themes.
HIS 202 Contemporary Global Issues This course will offer a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the global society as it enters the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern global society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science, and history. (Cross-listed with ANT/ECO/GEO/HIS/POL/SOC 202; may only earn credit in one department.)
HIS 308 Reforming U.S. Society An exploration of moral and political reform and the reform impulse in the United States. Reform topics will include women’s rights, antislavery, civil rights, temperance, populism, social and economic justice, and progressivism.
HIS 321 Wisconsin History An exploration of the history of Wisconsin, focusing on place, people, and the development of regional culture. Special emphasis will be given to environment, native peoples, ethnicity, the Progressive transformation of state politics, and community from the territorial period to the recent past.
HIS 340 Origins of Cities This course examines the origins and development of urban life. Students will first explore, from an anthropological perspective, the character of modern cities. Students will next examine the earliest cities in the Old and New Worlds, and comparatively explore the varied ecological, social, political, and demographic processes associated with urbanization in various ancient civilizations (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus Valley, China, Andes, and Mesoamerica). While the focus of this course is on archaeological cities, it draws heavily on ethnographic and sociological studies of urban forms. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a comparative understanding and appreciation of urban life and its long history. (Cross-listed with ARC/HIS; may only earn credit in one department.)
HIS 342 Twentieth Century Latin America The struggle for economic development, political democracy, and social justice in the period of developing nationalism since World War I. The Non-Hispanic Caribbean is included.
HIS 370 The History of Black Women's Activism An historical overview of the thoughts, actions, and creative products of black women activists in the United States, from slavery to the present. Students will examine historical analyses, speeches, essays, economic activities, organizational styles, political issues, and various forms of artistic expression that women of African descent have produced in order to query, resist, and defy the interlocking oppressions of racism, sexism, and class-ism in the United States.
HIS 378 History of the U.S. West This course focuses on the history of the Trans-Mississippi West from European contact to the late 20th century, with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics covered include the federal West, settlement, immigration, extractive industries, agriculture, aridity, the environment, and Native Americans.
HWM 430 Population Health for Wellness Managers This course introduces the evolution of health problems and services and will examine the methods designed to capture a community health profile. The participant will apply concepts involved in measuring and understanding the health of individuals and populations in order to enhance quality of life. The key social determinants of health and their interactions will be considered.
MGT 308  Behavior and Theory in Organizations This course provides an introduction to Organizational Behavior and Theory. Emphasis is on key individual and group level behavioral processes deemed essential for effective management. They include perception, motivation, communication, and group dynamics. In addition, the course covers some basic concepts of organizational theory such as organizational structure and design, organizational culture, and strategy and goals.
MGT 328  Principles of Management Thought This course focuses on the principles and evolution of 'management' thinking from the advent of the industrial revolution to the present in an increasingly integrated and interconnected world. This course places management thought in a larger political, economic, social and temporal context. It focuses on how management thinking and its accompanying frameworks and practices must evolve and change if it is to make contemporary organizational life creative, effective, and sustainable. (This course should be taken in the first semester of admission to the business program and management major.)
MGT 360 Global Perspective on Business This course focuses on managing in today's increasingly interconnected world. Special attention is paid to creating and maintaining sustainable business practices across international boundaries, including building socially, economically and environmentally effective organizations in a culturally diverse world.
MGT 393 Production and Operations Management This introductory course provides business students with the processes of creating and disseminating value in both manufacturing and service operations. The course includes the theoretical foundations for production and operations management, as well as how decision-making techniques aid the manager in creating and delivering value. Global production and distribution strategies are integrated with management processes and projects. Topics include the operation system and processes, the lean and agile enterprise, six sigma, supply chain management and global logistics. Emerging information and manufacturing technologies within the global supply chain are reviewed.
MGT 449 Administrative Policy Determination An integrated case study approach to the variables in management policy determination at the business strategy level. The course will operationally apply the principles, concepts, and methods of the College of Business Administration core requirements to both actual and simulated case situations. May be taken only in the semester of graduation.
MIC 102 Global Bioterrorism An overview of current potential biological warfare agents. Topic areas will include an historical overview, an explanation of differences in the classes of biological warfare agents, our preparedness to meet this threat, and counter measures to prevent a biological warfare catastrophe.
MIC 130 Global Impact of Infectious Disease A multifaceted examination of issues related to infectious disease throughout the world. The course will begin with historical examples of how infectious disease has impacted society, from plagues of centuries past to recent emerging diseases. After defining the types of pathogens and methods for their control, the interplay between infectious disease and global economics, health and politics will be evaluated. Additionally, the impact of public perceptions and misconceptions on the spread of infectious disease will be analyzed. Finally, the role of current human activities in shaping disease patterns of the future will be explored.
MIC 350  Bacterial Diversity A course is a survey of the bacteria. Lectures will cover bacterial classification and the structure, physiology, ecology, and applications of various groups of bacteria. Special emphasis will be on the more unique species and those of industrial, ecological and environmental importance. The laboratory will involve enrichment and isolation procedures for selective groups of bacteria. Lect. 2, Lab 3.
MIC 434 Aquatic Microbial Ecology An ecological study of bacteria, cyanobacteria and algae of aquatic ecosystems. Topics include microbial strategies for survival under various environmental conditions, the role of micro-organisms in biogeochemical cycling of elements, interactions of microorganisms with other aquatic biota, the role of microorganisms in pollution problems, and applications of microbial ecology to biotechnology. Laboratory emphasis is on experimental design and sampling techniques, quantification of microbial biomass, and measurement of microbial activities in aquatic habitats. One weekend field trip required. Lect. 2, Lab 3.
MIC 442  Plant Microbe Interactions This course will explore in depth various ways that plants interact with microbes in the environment, at the macroscopic, cellular, and molecular levels. Case studies will include both parasitic and mutualistic (symbiotic) interactions. Microbes include fungi, bacteria, nematodes, and viruses. Includes plant pathology and studies of the beneficial relationships between plants and microbes. Inquiry based labs are integrated into the lecture and discussion sessions. Lect. 2, Lab 2.
MKT 479 Marketing Management The analysis, planning, implementation and control of marketing programs designed to bring about desired exchanges with target markets within organizational objectives.
MLG 335 Service Learning in Latin America This course seeks to prepare students for a service learning trip to Latin America. The course explores issues such as racism and the African Diaspora in Latin America, ethnic and racial groups and their participation in Latin American societies, types and systems of oppression, social justice, and the effects of globalization on the environment. Students will also learn practical Spanish to use while working on projects with community partners.
MTH 265 Mathematical Models in Biology An introduction to the use of calculus and stochastic based models to the biological sciences. Mathematical tools such as discrete and continuous differential equations, linear algebra, phase portraits, probability theory and descriptive and inferential statistics that are necessary to analyze and interpret biological models will be covered. Biological topics may include single species and interacting population dynamics, modeling infectious diseases, enzyme kinetics, and quantitative genetics.
MTH 353 Differential Equations Fundamental existence and uniqueness theory, linear independence and the Wronskian, series solutions near regular singular points, Laplace transforms and systems of first order linear equations. Fourier Series and the method of separations of variables will be applied to the heat equation, wave equation and Laplace’s equation.
NUT 200 Human Nutrition Examination of the basic principles of the science of nutrition including understanding the basic sources of energy and the influences and effects of nutrition on one’s overall health and fitness. Cultural and environmental factors that influence food availability and consumption will also be investigated.
NUT 350 Functional Foods, Herbs, and Supplements Consumer interest in the relationship between diet and health has increased the demand for information about functional foods, herbals, and supplements. The purpose of this course is to explore current literature and research in these ever-growing and popular topics. Definitions, purpose, safety, efficacy, and risks of each topic will be covered. Additionally, topics of discussion will include specific functional components of food, herbals, and supplements.
NUT 400 Food Science and Safety This course examines the principles of food science including the functional role of carbohydrates, protein and fat. Emphasis will be placed on current topics of food science and safety in the national and local food industry including genetically modified and functional foods. Biological, chemical, and physical factors that affect the safety of food products will be discussed in addition to the role of microorganisms in foodborne illness and food quality.  Students in this course will also explore basic principles of food safety including food processing and food service as well as the role of government in food safety.
PHL 100 Introduction to Philosophy An introduction to the major views on important philosophic topics such as personal identity, freedom, knowledge, morality, religion, and social justice. Students cannot earn credit for the philosophy major/minor in both PHL 100 and PHL 200.
PHL 330  Philosophy of Food: The Dining Experience Philosophy of Food explores the aesthetic, ethical and existential features of the dining experience. Beginning with the pleasure features of food it moves to discussion on the relation of the disgusting and delicious, of the role of taste and food taboo, the proper relation of food and beauty, the question of whether food can constitute art, the relation of food and the sexual, and the role of the aesthetic in unpacking ethical evaluation of food choices. Phenomenological accounts are provided of the experiences of eating disorders and models of thinness and obesity. Next it looks at the metaphysics and epistemology of establishing criteria for nutritional value, the ideology of nutritionism, analysis of function foods, the defenses/critiques of genetically modified organisms (GMO) and so-called Frankenfoods. Further it investigates ethical discourse on eating behavior, ethical arguments for vegetarianism, veganism, carnism and omnivorism , and gendered accounts of proper eating behavior. Lastly, philosophical arguments about appropriate ethical  responses to world hunger are evaluated as  well as development of arguments about the proper role of being a world food citizen.
PHL 336  International Multicultural Philosophy This survey course will examine philosophical ideas and systems that are generated from a wide range of cultural traditions world wide. The aim of this search will be to broaden and deepen our understanding and appreciation of the multiplicity of philosophical perspectives which are part of an increasingly diverse, interconnected, and globalized world.
PHL 337 Legal, Political, and Social Philosophy An examination of philosophical issues concerning legal, political, and social structures. A discussion of philosophical accounts of the nature and justification of law and the state, of the relation of morality and the law, of the relation of morality and the state, and of the nature of legal-political obligation and responsibility. Philosophical accounts of justice, liberty, rights, and obligation and the relation of these topics to contemporary legal, political and social problems will be covered.
PHL 341 Environmental Ethics Philosophical reflections on humanity’s relationship to the natural world. The course will examine classic American perspectives (e.g. Leopold, transcendentalists), Asian perspectives, Native American perspectives, and contemporary environmental philosophies such as social ecology, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Course discussions will include the historical roots of the contemporary environmental crisis, the development of a personal environmental philosophy, and the role of a citizen in advancing environmental awareness and responsible land and water use.
PHL 401 World Ethics An investigation of major ethical problems facing the world as a whole from an international perspective, including world medicine, international economic relations, world environmental ethics, international individual rights issues, world diversity concerns, and international conflict and cooperation.
PHY 142 Navigating Global Nuclear Issues This course will serve as an introduction to the topic of nuclear weapons, energy and policy in society. This includes the social, economic, cultural and political aspects surrounding the development of nuclear weapons and their place in the world, especially in current events.  International organizations will be discussed along with their role in regulation and recommending economic sanctions.  We will look at the resurgence of nuclear energy and how it affects everything from the environment to global trade. Finally, the role of terrorism and the impact this has on shaping the human experience will be explored.
POL 202 Contemporary Global Issues This course offers a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the global society in the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern global society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science, and history. (Cross-listed with ANT/ECO/GEO/HIS/POL/SOC 202; may only earn credit in one department.)
POL 318 Interest Group Politics An in-depth exploration of environmental politics and policy making beginning with American environmentalism in the 1960s and concluding with global environmental politics in the 21st century. Environmental issues, ethics, institutional problems, philosophical approaches, economic analyses and implementation problems will be studied.
PSY 282 Cross-Cultural Psychology An orientation to the definitions, concepts, theories, and methodologies of cross-cultural psychology. Included is an examination of cultural and ecological factors and their influences on perceptual and cognitive processes, personality, language, and other psychological variables.
PSY 415 Multicultural Counseling This course focuses on the effects of culture on the nature and behavior of individuals, their adaptations to institutions and environments, and their relations within and outside their culture. Specifically, the impact of concepts such as ethnocentrism, stereotypes, racism and prejudice are explored in terms of their relevance to the counseling process. Counseling strategies and skills relevant to providing effective multicultural counseling are investigated.
PSY 442 Racism and Oppression This course focuses on psychological theory and research regarding individual, group, historical, institutional, and societal causes of racism and oppression. The manifestations and consequences of racism and oppression are examined as are the challenges inherent in reducing racism and oppression. Both historical and contemporary racism and oppression in a global context are analyzed.
REC 202 Leisure, Nature, and Contemplative Experiences This course utilizes natural environments as a venue for experientially teaching Recreation Management students the role of leisure in a complete and balanced lifestyle. Weekend field trips will be required.
REC 320  Principles and Practices of Tourism An introduction to the nature and scope of tourism that is intimately related to recreation. This course provides a basic understanding of tourism from the tourism system perspective. The topics include tourist behavior, special-interest tourism, destination marketing, economic, social-cultural, and environmental impacts of tourism on a destination, and sustainable tourism development. In addition to the business and economic benefits of tourism, it also examines the social aspects of tourism.
REC 400 Planning for Park and Recreation Facilities Designed to equip the student with the basic knowledge necessary to understand and implement the planning process in the development of park and recreation facilities. This course is also designed to familiarize the student with federal, state and local statutes, and other related documents (U.S. Census, Wisconsin Administrative Codes, county and municipal ordinances).
RTH 250 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation This course is designed as an introduction to the history and foundations of therapeutic recreation. Models of health care/human services and therapeutic recreation are presented. Students will gain knowledge of services and settings; professional, legal and community resources; professional and ethical behavior.
RTH 325  Inclusive Recreation This course is designed to provide the student with information regarding the general techniques and guidelines for planning and implementing recreational activities for persons with disabilities in non-institutional settings. The course will present general background, characteristics of disabling conditions, legislation, and program adaptations.
RTH 462 Inclusive Recreation Program Administration This course is designed to provide the student with information relating to recreation in inclusive settings. General Administration concepts, management concepts, advocacy, legislation, and therapeutic recreation as a related service in the schools will receive special emphasis in this course.
SOC 202  Contemporary Global Issues This course will offer a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the Global Society as it enters the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern Global Society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science and history.
SOC 307 International Development and Culture Change This course provides students with an overview of socio-cultural theories of international development and culture change. The course examines the cultural construction of 'development' as a product of the colonial era, the Cold War, and what has been called the neoliberal global economy. The goal of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive study of the strengths and limitations of contemporary development theory and method in anthropology and sociology, including such topics as conservation and the environment, indigenous peoples, gender and development, and the role of social movements and non-governmental organizations in the developmental process.
SOC 337 Globalization, Women, and Work This course examines the global and often exploitative experiences of women, migrating from one part of the world to another for work. As women leave their countries of origin, many find themselves working as nannies, sex workers, house cleaners and modern-day slaves in sweatshops. These work environments often create vulnerability, discrimination, and abuse of women within the private and public institutions of their host countries. The course will also use in-depth personal narratives and a focus on grassroots social movements to witness how women resist workplace policies and domestic laws to campaign for their rights, despite cultural and political constraints.
SOC 360 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America An analysis of cultural impact of catastrophic events in human societies - natural and human-engineered disasters. Various dramatic upheavals will be explored across time and cultures as the class examines human and environmental traumas to which societies must adapt, the cultural interpretations/response which follow, and the manner in which major disasters have redefined and redirected the character and probable future history of each damaged, even endangered society. Study cases will include volcanic and weather cataclysms, plagues and associated population crashes, environmental catastrophes, as well as war, terrorism, and bio-terrorism.
SOC 404 Global Inequality This course explores explanations for inequality between countries.  Macro-sociological theories and comparative methods are used to analyze cross-cultural and cross-national differences and similarities in basic institutions, including family, education, and political economy. The main course objective is that students develop an understanding of the consequences of living in a world of global inequality.
THA 231 Stagecraft Theory and practice of scenic construction. A study of the stage and its equipment; the planning, building and painting of scenery and the practical aspects of stage lighting.
WGS 100 Gender, Race and Class in American Institutions (ES) This course provides an introduction to how gender, race and class have intertwined over time to produce women’s social roles and status in American culture. The creation, transmittal, interpretation and institutionalization of gender roles will be examined using family and kinship, the educational system, the media, work, government and the health care system. The course provides a critical, interdisciplinary perspective on scholarship which omits or distorts the female experience.
WGS 201 Social Justice and Peer Education This course both educates students on social justice issues they face while in college and prepares them to be able to give presentations to peers in residence halls, classrooms, athletic teams, and student organizations with the goal of effecting social change. Subject matter will respond to campus needs. Repeatable for credit - maximum three.
WGS 337 Globalization, Women, and Work This course examines the global and often exploitative experiences of women, migrating from one part of the world to another for work. As women leave their countries of origin, many find themselves working as nannies, sex workers, house cleaners and modern-day slaves in sweatshops. These work environments often create vulnerability, discrimination, and abuse of women within the private and public institutions of their host countries. The course will also use in-depth personal narratives and a focus on grassroots social movements to witness how women resist workplace policies and domestic laws to campaign for their rights, despite cultural and political constraints.
WGS 370 The History of Black Women's Activism An historical overview of the thoughts, actions, and creative products of black women activists in the United States, from slavery to the present. Students will examine historical analyses, speeches, essays, economic activities, organizational styles, political issues, and various forms of artistic expression that women of African descent have produced in order to query, resist, and defy the interlocking oppressions of racism, sexism, and class-ism in the United States.
WGS 373 Gender and Human Rights This course will provide an overview of transnational women's human rights movements in a variety of locations around the world; locations will vary with the instructor. Included in this overview will be the study of women's political participation as a human rights issue; women's bodily integrity as a human right; violence against women and reproductive sexual health and rights; human rights as a framework for social and economic and gender justice; and human rights as (quasi) legal accountability; UN agreements, treaties and venues of redress.