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  Frog internal anatomy 1

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The above image shows a ventral view of a dissected preserved frog with the abdominal skin and muscles removed. Note that the largest and most conspicuous organ is the liver (1), which is divided into three lobes. Located between the right and left lobes of the liver is the gall bladder (2), which stores bile (a digestive juice) that is produced by the liver. When needed for digestion, the gall bladder secretes a small amount that aids in the breakdown of food, specifically fats. Structures belonging to the digestive system that can be seen include the stomach (3), small intestine (4) and large intestine (5). Other labeled structures include the bright orange or yellow fat bodies (6) that provide enough energy for a frog or toad to go without food during hibernation or estivation (burrowing to escape summer heat and arid conditions) for over a year, the heart (7) and deflated urinary bladder (8).

 

Note: The urinary bladder of anurans is a membranous structure that is only inflated when full of urine. Because it is so thin and highly vascular, frogs and toads can actually reabsorb water from the bladder during times of drought, using it as a reservoir in such situations. 

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