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Devil's Lake State Park

Incredible scenery and a full range of recreational activities make this the most popular of Wisconsin's State Parks.

500-foot quartzite bluffs tower above and nearly encircle a clear 360-acre lake.

Making for one of the Midwest's finest climbing destinations. The quartzite cliffs contain over 1,600 climbing routes ranging in length from 30 to 90 ft tall.

The 9,117-acre state park is 2 miles south of Baraboo and about 30 miles north of Madison.

Devil's Lake Sate Park is the site of our Rock climbing trip.
Visit the Devil's Lake State Park website to learn more.

Apostle Islands

This 21-island chain, in Lake Superior along the northern Wisconsin border, was designated a National Lake shore in 1970 and includes old-growth forests, sandstone bluffs, sea caves, and a variety of plant and animal wildlife. In 2004, a federal law designated 80 percent of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore as wilderness, and named it after former Wisconsin governor and U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson.

Apostle Islands is the site of our Kayaking trip
Visit the Living Adventure website to learn more.

Porcupine Mountains

The Porcupine Mountains introduces visitors to the rich wilderness heritage of this 60,000-acre park. Set alongside the largest old-growth hardwood-hemlock forest in the Great Lakes region, the center features exhibits and programs that tell the story of Michigan's rugged Upper Peninsula.

Porcupine Mountains is the site of our Backpacking trip
Visit the Porcupine Mountains website to learn more.

Wisconsin River Driftless Area

Never touched by glaciers, the Driftless Wisconsin Area is characterized by its beautifully sculpted topography. Forested hillsides reach down to valleys cut into limestone bedrock by cold-water trout streams. Forests, prairie remnants, wetlands, and grasslands provide habitat for wildflowers and wildlife. Land is farmed by the descendants of those who first settled here, by the Amish who adopted the area, and by a new breed of organic farmer. Artists, who need look no further than their own backyard for inspiration, create works of infinite variety.

Wisconsin River Driftless Area is the site of our Canoeing trip
Visit the Wisconsin Driftless Area website to learn more.