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Elizabeth Brown

Specialty area(s)

Business Law, Financial Services Regulation (banking, securities, & insurance), Corporate Social Responsibility

Brief biography

Prof. Brown’s scholarship focuses on the regulation of financial services (insurance, securities, and banking) both within the United States and overseas. She currently serves as one of only two academics on the 21-member Federal Advisory Committee on Insurance (FACI) that advises the Federal Insurance Office within the Department of the Treasury. In 2015, she completed and had published two reports for the Volcker Alliance’s Federal Financial Regulatory Agencies Structural Reform Project. 

Current courses at UWL

BLAW 205 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

BLAW 305 - Business Law: US Legal Transactions

Education

Prof. Brown received her B.A. with Honors in international relations from the College of William and Mary, her M.A. in international relations from the Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and her J.D. from the University of Chicago, where she was symposium articles editor of The University of Chicago Law School Roundtable.

Teaching history

Prof. Brown joined the UW-L legal studies faculty in August of 2015. Before joining the UW-L faculty, Prof. Brown taught in Georgia State University's Risk Management and Insurance Department in Atlanta, Georgia from 2009 to 2015 and at the University of St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis, Minnesota. from 2002 to 2008. She also was a visiting professor at the University of Indiana Maurer School of Law in Bloomington, Indiana during the 2008 Fall Semester. While at St. Thomas, she received the Award for Excellence in Professional Preparation for her teaching.

Professional history

Prior to entering academia, she worked at Clifford Chance in London where she focused on securities transactions having a value of more than $30 billion. Ms. Brown has also worked at Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue in Chicago, where she focused primarily on mergers and acquisition transactions, and at Baker Botts in Houston, where her work involved corporate and securities transactions. In addition, she worked for four years as an international economist for the International Trade Administration (ITA) in the U.S. Department of Commerce, first in the Office of Africa and later in the Office of East European and Soviet Affairs. While at Commerce, she counseled both Fortune 500 and small businesses on exporting to and investing in the countries that she covered and participated in the negotiations for the bilateral investment treaty and trade agreement between the United States and Bulgaria. In 1991, she received the Bronze Medal for Service, which is the highest award within ITA.

Research and publishing

Includes, but is not limited to, the following publications:
• Brown, Elizabeth F., Lessons from the Efforts to Manage the Shift to Defined Contribution Plans in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, 53 AM. BUS. L. J. 315 (Summer 2016).
• Elizabeth F. Brown and Robert W. Klein, Chapter 8 on Insurance Solvency Regulation: A New World Order? in RESEARCH HANDBOOK ON THE LAW AND ECONOMICS OF INSURANCE, ed. Daniel Schwarcz and Peter Siegelman, (Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015).
• Brown, Elizabeth F., Will the Federal Insurance Office Improve Insurance Regulation? 81 U. CINCINNATI L. REV. 551 (2013) (invited symposium contribution).
• Brown, Elizabeth F., The New Laws and Regulations for Financial Conglomerates: Will They Better Manage The Risks Than the Previous Ones? 60 AM. U. L. REV. 1339 (2011) (invited symposium contribution).
• Brown, Elizabeth F., A Comparison of the Handling of the Financial Crisis in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia, 55 VILLANOVA L. REV. 509 (2010) (invited symposium contribution).
• Brown, Elizabeth F., The Development of International Norms for Insurance Regulation, 34 BROOKLYN J. OF INT'L LAW 954 (2009) (invited symposium contribution).
• Brown, Elizabeth F., E Pluribus Unum – Out of Many, One: Why the United States Needs a Single Financial Regulator, 14 U. MIAMI BUS. L. REV. 1 (Fall/Winter 2005) (lead article).