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Joshua Neukom

Specialty area(s)

Organic Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry

Brief biography

I am originally from Waukegan, Illinois and attended college at DePaul University (Chicago, IL, B.S. 2004). After two years working for the U.S. EPA as an intern, I decided to go back to school to purse a Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry (The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor, 2011) after I became passionate about that subject and about teaching. After teaching a variety of chemistry classes for two years at Carthage College (Kenosha, WI), I started at UWL in 2015. I currently teach CHM 305, CHM 300L, and CHM 103L. When not teaching, you can probably find me setting up the organic labs, spending time with my dog Minnie, pushing the limits of my slow-cooker, watching old Monty Python skits, searching for shrubberies, and studying the migration habits of non-migratory birds.

Current courses at UWL

CHM 305

CHM 300L

CHM 103L

Education

B.S. Chemistry - DePaul University, Chicago, IL (2004)
Ph.D. Organic Chemistry - The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (2011)

Teaching history

The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, GSI/GAANN Fellow (2006-2011)
Carthage College, Kenosha, WI, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (2013-2015)

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Associate Lecturer (2015-present)

Professional history

United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5 CRL, Chicago, IL, Intern (2004-2006)
Carthage College, Kenosha, WI, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (2013-2015)

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Associate Lecturer (2015-present)

Research and publishing

My previous publications are grouped under:

(1) development of new methods for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocycles (pyrrolidines and benzodiazepines)

(2) mechanistic and kinetic studies into organometallic reactions (alkene insertion reactions)

(3) misc, including an LC-MS/MS article in Talanta as well as a book chapter.

My research interests are mostly in synthetic organic chemistry (methods), organometallic reaction mechanisms, and catalysis.