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Joshua Neukom

Specialty area(s)

Organic Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry

Brief biography

I am originally from Waukegan, Illinois and attended college at DePaul University (Chicago, IL, B.S. 2004). After two years working for the U.S. EPA as an intern, I decided to go back to school to purse a Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry (The University of Michigan--Ann Arbor, 2011) after I became passionate about that subject and about teaching. After teaching a variety of chemistry classes for two years at Carthage College (Kenosha, WI), I started at UW-L in 2015. I currently teach CHM 305, CHM 300L, and CHM 103L. When I am not teaching, you can probably find me spending time with my dog Minnie, pushing the limits of my slow-cooker, watching old Monty Python skits, searching for shrubberies, and studying the migration habits of non-migratory birds.

Current courses at UWL

CHM 305

CHM 300L

CHM 103L

Education

B.S. Chemistry - DePaul University, Chicago, IL (2004)
Ph.D. Organic Chemistry - The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI (2011)

Teaching history

The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI, GSI/GAANN Fellow (2006-2011)
Carthage College, Kenosha, WI, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (2013-2015)

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Associate Lecturer (2015-present)

Professional history

United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5 CRL, Chicago, IL, Intern (2004-2006)
Carthage College, Kenosha, WI, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (2013-2015)

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Associate Lecturer (2015-present)

Research and publishing

My previous publications are grouped under:

(1) development of new methods for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocycles (pyrrolidines and benzodiazepines)

(2) mechanistic and kinetic studies into organometallic reactions (alkene insertion reactions)

(3) misc, including an LC-MS/MS article in Talanta as well as a book chapter.

My research interests are mostly in synthetic organic chemistry (methods), organometallic reaction mechanisms, and catalysis.