2019 Winter Session 


PHL 100: Introduction to Philosophy 

Are you looking for answers to life's important questions? This course offers the student an introduction to the major views on important philosophic topics such as reality, personal identity, freedom, knowledge, morality, religion, and social justice.

Instructor: Samuel Cocks

Internet


Spring 2019


PHL 100: Introduction to Philosophy

Are you looking for answers to life's important questions? This course offers the student an introduction to the major views on important philosophic topics such as reality, personal identity, freedom, knowledge, morality, religion, and social justice.

Instructor:  Sheryl Tuttle-Ross

TuTh 3:55 PM-5:20 PM


PHL 101: Introduction to Logic

An introduction to logic, the science of valid reasoning. This course introduces the student to both formal and informal methods of reasoning and evaluating arguments.

Instructor: Eric Kraemer 

TuTh 12:40 PM - 2:05 PM


PHL 101: Introduction to Logic

An introduction to logic, the science of valid reasoning. This course introduces the student to both formal and informal methods of reasoning and evaluating arguments.

Instructor: Mary Krizan

MoWe 3:55 PM - 5:20 PM


PHL 206: History of Modern Philosophy

Principal questions of philosophy, and history of their analysis from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment.

Instructor: Mary Krizan

MoWe 2:15 PM - 3:40 PM


PHL 300:  The Philosophy and Politics of Existentialism

In this course we will explore the philosophical and political implications of existentialism through the writings of three seminal 20th Century European philosophers: Husserl, Heidegger, and Sartre. Focused on the field of philosophy that develops from their work, the aim of the course is to examine the social and political implications of important philosophical questions related to existence, authenticity, personality, and Being. Concepts we will explore include Husserl’s notion of empathy and a political body as a “personality of a higher order,” Heidegger’s articulation of authenticity and being-in-the-world, and Sartre’s notion of human freedom. Questions we will ask include: What is the relationship between politics and truth? How is a political body unique? How does a political system influence the realm of human possibility? Answers to these questions propose significant challenges in both philosophy and political theory, and have implications for how we understand human life as it relates to others in a community.

Instructor: Samuel Cocks (Philosophy), Timothy Dale (Political Science and Public Administration) 

TuTh: 9:25 AM - 10:50 AM


PHL 302: Symbolic Logic

This is an intermediate level course in formal logic, with an emphasis on proofs in first-order logic.

Instructor: Mary Krizan

Monday 5:30 - 8:15


PHL 330: Philosophy of Food: The Dining Experience

This course explores the aesthetic, ethical and existential features of the dining experience. Beginning with the pleasure features of food it moves to discussion on the relation of the disgusting and delicious, of the role of taste and food taboo, the proper relation of food and beauty, the question of whether food can constitute art, the relation of food and the sexual, and the role of the aesthetic in unpacking ethical evaluation of food choices. Phenomenological accounts are provided of the experiences of eating disorders and models of thinness and obesity. Next it looks at the metaphysics and epistemology of establishing criteria for nutritional value, the ideology of nutritionism, analysis of functional foods, the defenses/critiques of genetically modified organisms (GMO) and so-called Frankenfoods. Further it investigates ethical discourse on eating behavior, ethical arguments for vegetarianism, veganism, carnism and omnivorism, and gendered accounts of proper eating behavior. Lastly, philosophical arguments about appropriate ethical responses to world hunger are evaluated as well as development of arguments about the proper role of being a world food citizen.

Instructor: Sheryl Tuttle-Ross

Internet


PHL 349: Asian Philosophy

Introduction to the main questions found in the Asian philosophical traditions. We will read Indian, Chinese, and Japanese philosophers, with a special emphasis on Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. Questions will be centered in ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics. Conceptual connections will be made with Western philosophical traditions.

Instructor: Samuel Cocks

MoWeFr 9:55 AM - 10:50 AM