Jason L. Church was born on Fort Knox, Kentucky and grew up in Menomonie, Wisconsin. He attended the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse from 2007 to 2011 where he was a four-year letter winner in football, and an Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) Cadet. After graduating with a Bachelor’s of Science Political Science he was commissioned onto Active Duty in May of 2011 as an Infantry Officer. After completing Infantry Officer’s Basic Course at Fort Benning, Georgia, he reported to C Company, 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. In May 2012, (then) 2nd Lieutenant Church deployed with this unit to Panjwaii District, Afghanistan. The unit’s mission was to establish the legitimacy of Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and further develop the Afghan National Security Forces.

On the 23 August 2012, Lieutenant Church and nine other members of his platoon were engaged by the enemy with an improvised explosive device (IED). He was immediately transported to Kandahar Air Field by helicopter. The IED blast resulted in the amputation of both of Lieutenant Church’s legs below the knee. In the months that followed he underwent 21 surgeries at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, before receiving his prosthetics and going through the recovery process. He was promoted to Captain and medically retired from the Army on 31 July 2014.

He graduated from Georgetown University with a Master of Arts in U.S. Security Policy and attends law school at the University of Wisconsin. He is currently a Regional Director for Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin. He received the 2014 NCAA Inspirational Award at the 2014 National Convention.

Captain Church’s military awards and decorations include the Purple Heart, the Army Commendation Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with one Bronze Service Star, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) Medal, the Combat Infantry Badge, the Parachutist Badge, the Ranger Tab, and the 2nd Infantry Division Combat Service identification Badge.

Cadets from across the nation come to La Crosse to compete in the Army ROTC grueling Northern Warfare Challenge. This physical and skill based challenge covers 18 miles in our own backyard, starting and ending at Grandad's Bluff. Cadets must carry 35-45 lbs on their back while competing in tasks like starting a controlled fire, knot tying, weapons qualification, and much more! Cadets Competing in La Crosse Bluffs Cadets from across the nation come to La Crosse to compete in the Army ROTC grueling Northern Warfare Challenge. This physical and skill based challenge covers 18 miles in our own backyard, starting and ending at Grandad's Bluff. Cadets must carry 35-45 lbs on their back while competing in tasks like starting a controlled fire, knot tying, weapons qualification, and much more!
ROTC is run by the students enrolled in our program. They lead in our classes and mentor the younger Cadets. This is executed by clear communication and encouragement. Cadets in Charge ROTC is run by the students enrolled in our program. They lead in our classes and mentor the younger Cadets. This is executed by clear communication and encouragement.
Our Cadets compete for the opportunity to be trained and experience rappelling out of a hovering helicopter. The adrenaline rushes as they utilize their training and descend the 50 feet to the solid ground below them. Rappelling + Helicopters Our Cadets compete for the opportunity to be trained and experience rappelling out of a hovering helicopter. The adrenaline rushes as they utilize their training and descend the 50 feet to the solid ground below them.
Through the years that you spend in the Army ROTC program, you work closely with your peers to learn, to train, and eventually to teach those following in your footsteps. The classes of students are there for you through the thick and thin. You become part of the Eagle Battalion Family! Family Atmosphere Through the years that you spend in the Army ROTC program, you work closely with your peers to learn, to train, and eventually to teach those following in your footsteps. The classes of students are there for you through the thick and thin. You become part of the Eagle Battalion Family!
Many of our Cadets volunteer their time with our Eagle Battalion Color Guard. We present the Colors at football games, in parades, and at veteran events. This comes as a great honor to represent those that came before us and those that currently serve. Honor at the Football Field Many of our Cadets volunteer their time with our Eagle Battalion Color Guard. We present the Colors at football games, in parades, and at veteran events. This comes as a great honor to represent those that came before us and those that currently serve.
Every year, our Cadets volunteer in helping the new students move into their dorms. Moving in the Students Every year, our Cadets volunteer in helping the new students move into their dorms.
Our program makes a point to keep volunteering as an integral part of what we do. One of our repeating volunteer projects has been helping rebuild or replace bridges in the Hixon Forest. Each class completes a project each semester as a team. Where should we go next? Repairing the Trails Our program makes a point to keep volunteering as an integral part of what we do. One of our repeating volunteer projects has been helping rebuild or replace bridges in the Hixon Forest. Each class completes a project each semester as a team. Where should we go next?