Timothy E. Hornik grew up in Chicago, Illinois and attended Viterbo University from 1998 to 2002 on a four-year Army Reserve Training Corps scholarship. After graduating with a Bachelors of Liberal Studies, he was commissioned onto Active Duty in May of 2002 as an Air Defense Artillery Officer. After graduating from Air Defense Artillery Basic Officer Leadership Course at Fort Bliss, Texas, he was assigned to 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, in South Korea. After completing his tour in South Korea (then) First Lieutenant Hornik was assigned to 4th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas.

While commanding an M6 Linebacker (air defense variant of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle) on a joint operation with the Iraqi National Guard on Veteran’s Day (11 November 2004), he was shot by an insurgent sniper. Lieutenant Hornik was permanently blinded but miraculously survived his injuries. Despite his combat wound he remained on Active Duty in the Army and was promoted to Captain in 2005. He served in Operational Test Command before being selected for the Army Wounded Warrior Education Initiative in 2008. The program enabled him to earn a Master’s in Social Work at the University of Kansas, where the School of Social Welfare awarded him the Margo Award for clinical practice in 2010. He became a Licensed Maters of Social Work in the state of Kansas. Captain Timothy E. Hornik was medically retired from the U.S. Army on 28 December 2011. In 2014 he received the University of Kansas Wounded Warrior Scholarship enabling him to pursue a PhD in Therapeutic Sciences from the University of Kansas Medical Center.

Captain Hornik’s military awards and decorations include the Purple Heart, the Meritorious Service Medal with Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster, the Army Commendation Medal for Valor, the Army Commendation Medal with two Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters, the National Defense Service Medal, the Iraq Campaign Medal with one Bronze Service Star, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Korean Defense Service Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the Army Overseas Service Ribbon, the Combat Action Badge, and the 1st Division Combat Service Identification Badge.

Cadets from across the nation come to La Crosse to compete in the Army ROTC grueling Northern Warfare Challenge. This physical and skill based challenge covers 18 miles in our own backyard, starting and ending at Grandad's Bluff. Cadets must carry 35-45 lbs on their back while competing in tasks like starting a controlled fire, knot tying, weapons qualification, and much more! Cadets Competing in La Crosse Bluffs Cadets from across the nation come to La Crosse to compete in the Army ROTC grueling Northern Warfare Challenge. This physical and skill based challenge covers 18 miles in our own backyard, starting and ending at Grandad's Bluff. Cadets must carry 35-45 lbs on their back while competing in tasks like starting a controlled fire, knot tying, weapons qualification, and much more!
ROTC is run by the students enrolled in our program. They lead in our classes and mentor the younger Cadets. This is executed by clear communication and encouragement. Cadets in Charge ROTC is run by the students enrolled in our program. They lead in our classes and mentor the younger Cadets. This is executed by clear communication and encouragement.
Our Cadets compete for the opportunity to be trained and experience rappelling out of a hovering helicopter. The adrenaline rushes as they utilize their training and descend the 50 feet to the solid ground below them. Rappelling + Helicopters Our Cadets compete for the opportunity to be trained and experience rappelling out of a hovering helicopter. The adrenaline rushes as they utilize their training and descend the 50 feet to the solid ground below them.
Through the years that you spend in the Army ROTC program, you work closely with your peers to learn, to train, and eventually to teach those following in your footsteps. The classes of students are there for you through the thick and thin. You become part of the Eagle Battalion Family! Family Atmosphere Through the years that you spend in the Army ROTC program, you work closely with your peers to learn, to train, and eventually to teach those following in your footsteps. The classes of students are there for you through the thick and thin. You become part of the Eagle Battalion Family!
Many of our Cadets volunteer their time with our Eagle Battalion Color Guard. We present the Colors at football games, in parades, and at veteran events. This comes as a great honor to represent those that came before us and those that currently serve. Honor at the Football Field Many of our Cadets volunteer their time with our Eagle Battalion Color Guard. We present the Colors at football games, in parades, and at veteran events. This comes as a great honor to represent those that came before us and those that currently serve.
Every year, our Cadets volunteer in helping the new students move into their dorms. Moving in the Students Every year, our Cadets volunteer in helping the new students move into their dorms.
Our program makes a point to keep volunteering as an integral part of what we do. One of our repeating volunteer projects has been helping rebuild or replace bridges in the Hixon Forest. Each class completes a project each semester as a team. Where should we go next? Repairing the Trails Our program makes a point to keep volunteering as an integral part of what we do. One of our repeating volunteer projects has been helping rebuild or replace bridges in the Hixon Forest. Each class completes a project each semester as a team. Where should we go next?