Major General James J. Mingus enlisted into the Iowa Army National Guard in 1981. He was commissioned in the Field Artillery Branch in 1985 from Winona State University and later branched Infantry after he entered active duty in 1987. He served as a platoon leader, executive officer, and battalion maintenance officer at 2nd Battalion, 30th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Division in Germany from 1988 to 1991. As a captain, he served as a rifle company commander, 2-505 PIR, Division Long Range Surveillance Detachment commander, aide-de-camp to the commanding general, and commander of the XVIII Airborne Corps Long Range Surveillance Company. MG Mingus subsequently served as an ROTC Assistant Professor of Military Science instructor for the University of Tennessee-Knoxville from 1997 to 1999. He was then selected to be the liaison officer, and later Battalion S3 for the 1st Ranger Battalion from 2000 to 2003. He then served as the chief, Joint Planning Group, and later chief, Current Operations at Joint Special Operations Command. He then commanded the 4th Ranger Training Battalion from 2005 to 2007 and subsequently commanded the Regimental Special Troops Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, from 2007-2009. In 2010, he assumed command of the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, where he deployed the brigade in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Between 2001 and 2012, he deployed 12 times in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. He served in United States Central Command as the director of the Commander's Action Group, executive officer to the commander, and the deputy J5, Plans. He then served as the Deputy Commanding General (Maneuver), 4th Infantry Division. Most recently he served as the Director, Mission Command Center of Excellence. 


Major General Mingus is married to the former Amy Hedgepeth of Lumberton, NC. They have one daughter and two sons.

MG Mingus

Cadets from across the nation come to La Crosse to compete in the Army ROTC grueling Northern Warfare Challenge. This physical and skill based challenge covers 18 miles in our own backyard, starting and ending at Grandad's Bluff. Cadets must carry 35-45 lbs on their back while competing in tasks like starting a controlled fire, knot tying, weapons qualification, and much more! Cadets Competing in La Crosse Bluffs Cadets from across the nation come to La Crosse to compete in the Army ROTC grueling Northern Warfare Challenge. This physical and skill based challenge covers 18 miles in our own backyard, starting and ending at Grandad's Bluff. Cadets must carry 35-45 lbs on their back while competing in tasks like starting a controlled fire, knot tying, weapons qualification, and much more!
ROTC is run by the students enrolled in our program. They lead in our classes and mentor the younger Cadets. This is executed by clear communication and encouragement. Cadets in Charge ROTC is run by the students enrolled in our program. They lead in our classes and mentor the younger Cadets. This is executed by clear communication and encouragement.
Our Cadets compete for the opportunity to be trained and experience rappelling out of a hovering helicopter. The adrenaline rushes as they utilize their training and descend the 50 feet to the solid ground below them. Rappelling + Helicopters Our Cadets compete for the opportunity to be trained and experience rappelling out of a hovering helicopter. The adrenaline rushes as they utilize their training and descend the 50 feet to the solid ground below them.
Through the years that you spend in the Army ROTC program, you work closely with your peers to learn, to train, and eventually to teach those following in your footsteps. The classes of students are there for you through the thick and thin. You become part of the Eagle Battalion Family! Family Atmosphere Through the years that you spend in the Army ROTC program, you work closely with your peers to learn, to train, and eventually to teach those following in your footsteps. The classes of students are there for you through the thick and thin. You become part of the Eagle Battalion Family!
Many of our Cadets volunteer their time with our Eagle Battalion Color Guard. We present the Colors at football games, in parades, and at veteran events. This comes as a great honor to represent those that came before us and those that currently serve. Honor at the Football Field Many of our Cadets volunteer their time with our Eagle Battalion Color Guard. We present the Colors at football games, in parades, and at veteran events. This comes as a great honor to represent those that came before us and those that currently serve.
Every year, our Cadets volunteer in helping the new students move into their dorms. Moving in the Students Every year, our Cadets volunteer in helping the new students move into their dorms.
Our program makes a point to keep volunteering as an integral part of what we do. One of our repeating volunteer projects has been helping rebuild or replace bridges in the Hixon Forest. Each class completes a project each semester as a team. Where should we go next? Repairing the Trails Our program makes a point to keep volunteering as an integral part of what we do. One of our repeating volunteer projects has been helping rebuild or replace bridges in the Hixon Forest. Each class completes a project each semester as a team. Where should we go next?