Q: By enrolling in ROTC are you joining the ARMY?
A: No. Students who enroll in ROTC do not join the army. They take an ROTC class for which they receive credit. It is considered a college elective.

Q: Is ROTC like "boot camp"?
A: No. ROTC cadets go directly to college where they earn their degree.

Q: How much time does ROTC take up weekly?
A: ROTC cadets spend their time like typical college students. All that is required is a few hours a week.

Q: What can students expect to learn by taking ROTC?
A: Quite simply, leadership and management skills needed to become a U.S. Army officer or have a successful civilian career.

Q: What makes ROTC different from regular college management courses?
A: Students in ROTC learn through a unique program that involves both classroom and "live" situations. For instance, an ROTC cadet might be found leading classmates through adventure training, down a river in a raft, or up a mountain wall.

Q: Is there a military obligation during college?
A: During the first two years, ROTC cadets have no military obligation (or the first year in the case of scholarship winners).

Q: What is the ROTC course comprised of?
A: The ROTC program is divided into two phases: The Basic Course studies Army history, organization and structure. The techniques and principles of leadership and management are stressed throughout. The Advanced Course concentrates on the tactical operations and military instruction, as well as advanced techniques of management, leadership, and command.

Q: Does Army ROTC offer scholarships?
A: Yes. Each year hundreds of students attending college nationwide receive ROTC scholarships. ROTC awards them to students studying science, engineering, nursing, business, as well as a variety of other majors.

Q: How much money does ROTC usually award and what does the money go towards?
A: Scholarships are awarded at different monetary levels. At some schools an ROTC scholarship is worth up to $80,000, which goes towards tuition and educational fees. Also, scholarship winners receive an allowance of up to $4,500 a year.

Q: On what basis are scholarship winner's chosen?
A: ROTC scholarships are not based on financial need. Instead, they are awarded on merit. Merit is exhibited in academic achievement and extracurricular activities, such as sports, student government or part-time work.

Q: Can only scholarship winners enroll in ROTC?
A: Anyone can enroll in ROTC. And regardless of whether you are a scholarship recipient or not, all ROTC books, supplies and equipment are furnished at no cost to you.

Q: How often are Army ROTC scholarships awarded?
A: Four-year scholarships are awarded monthly starting in October for Seniors in High School. Four-year scholarship applications must be requested between July 1 through January 31. Also, once cadets are on campus, two-year and three-year scholarships become available.

Q: How do students benefit from Army ROTC?
A: In college and after graduation, cadets find that the training and experience they receive are assets--whether pursuing an Army or civilian career. Employers place high regard on the management and leadership skills that ROTC instructors stress. Plus, ROTC looks great on a résumé. When cadets complete the ROTC courses, upon graduation, they become commissioned officers in the US Army.

Q: If I attend Winona State University do I need to drive to La Crosse to participate in ROTC?

A: Though Winona State University is part of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse ROTC program, Military Science classes and Physical Readiness Training are held at Winona. Leadership Labs are mostly taught in La Crosse.

Cadets from across the nation come to La Crosse to compete in the Army ROTC grueling Northern Warfare Challenge. This physical and skill based challenge covers 18 miles in our own backyard, starting and ending at Grandad's Bluff. Cadets must carry 35-45 lbs on their back while competing in tasks like starting a controlled fire, knot tying, weapons qualification, and much more! Cadets Competing in La Crosse Bluffs Cadets from across the nation come to La Crosse to compete in the Army ROTC grueling Northern Warfare Challenge. This physical and skill based challenge covers 18 miles in our own backyard, starting and ending at Grandad's Bluff. Cadets must carry 35-45 lbs on their back while competing in tasks like starting a controlled fire, knot tying, weapons qualification, and much more!
ROTC is run by the students enrolled in our program. They lead in our classes and mentor the younger Cadets. This is executed by clear communication and encouragement. Cadets in Charge ROTC is run by the students enrolled in our program. They lead in our classes and mentor the younger Cadets. This is executed by clear communication and encouragement.
Our Cadets compete for the opportunity to be trained and experience rappelling out of a hovering helicopter. The adrenaline rushes as they utilize their training and descend the 50 feet to the solid ground below them. Rappelling + Helicopters Our Cadets compete for the opportunity to be trained and experience rappelling out of a hovering helicopter. The adrenaline rushes as they utilize their training and descend the 50 feet to the solid ground below them.
Through the years that you spend in the Army ROTC program, you work closely with your peers to learn, to train, and eventually to teach those following in your footsteps. The classes of students are there for you through the thick and thin. You become part of the Eagle Battalion Family! Family Atmosphere Through the years that you spend in the Army ROTC program, you work closely with your peers to learn, to train, and eventually to teach those following in your footsteps. The classes of students are there for you through the thick and thin. You become part of the Eagle Battalion Family!
Many of our Cadets volunteer their time with our Eagle Battalion Color Guard. We present the Colors at football games, in parades, and at veteran events. This comes as a great honor to represent those that came before us and those that currently serve. Honor at the Football Field Many of our Cadets volunteer their time with our Eagle Battalion Color Guard. We present the Colors at football games, in parades, and at veteran events. This comes as a great honor to represent those that came before us and those that currently serve.
Every year, our Cadets volunteer in helping the new students move into their dorms. Moving in the Students Every year, our Cadets volunteer in helping the new students move into their dorms.
Our program makes a point to keep volunteering as an integral part of what we do. One of our repeating volunteer projects has been helping rebuild or replace bridges in the Hixon Forest. Each class completes a project each semester as a team. Where should we go next? Repairing the Trails Our program makes a point to keep volunteering as an integral part of what we do. One of our repeating volunteer projects has been helping rebuild or replace bridges in the Hixon Forest. Each class completes a project each semester as a team. Where should we go next?