What's New?

Check out the Department Homepage  the Department Facebook page (Sociology at the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse) or the UWL Sociology Club Facebook page for the latest announcements, news, and reminders. Majors and minors are also occasionally informed about important events via e-mail, so be sure to check your student e-mail accounts regularly throughout the semester. 

Sociology & Criminal Justice kudos

Peter Marina

Peter Marina, Sociology & Criminal Justice, presented "A Transgressive Model of Policing: Transforming the Legal Gang to a Human Rights Organization" at American Society of Criminology Conference on Nov. 19 in Atlanta. The presentation stems from Marina's newly published book "Human Rights Policing: Reimagining Law Enforcement in the 21st Century" (Routledge Press (2022). This book is part of his larger work on analyzing new modalities of transgression, struggle, resistance, and transformation.

Submitted on: Nov. 21

Peter Marina

Peter Marina, Sociology & Criminal Justice, authored the book "Human Rights Policing Reimagining Law Enforcement in the 21st Century" published on Monday, Oct. 10 by Routledge Press. Relying on intense ethnography and extensive experiences teaching human rights policing to police officers, this book teaches law enforcement professionals how to apply human rights to their careers. But this book does more. It reimagines the institution of law enforcement as we push toward the later stages of modernity. It provides the intellectual tools on how to think about policing in new and creative ways.

Submitted on: Oct. 10

Peter Marina

Peter Marina, Sociology & Criminal Justice, authored the article "Human Rights Policing: Those Who Point the Finger are Often Most Guilty" in The Blue Magazine published on Monday, Sept. 5. Reaching out to those on the political left and right to expand Human Rights Policing, Marina discusses how projection "others" people and leads to increased class divisions that undermine human rights. If we realize our own tendencies to project our insecurities and flaws onto other people, perhaps we can work toward solving structural problems instead of scapegoating people.

Submitted on: Sept. 5

Nicholas Bakken and Lisa Kruse

Nicholas Bakken and Lisa Kruse, both Sociology & Criminal Justice, presented "Creating Legitimacy in a Drug Treatment Court: Participants' Experiences Shifting From Adversarial to Supportive Criminal Justice Environments" at WiSys on Aug. 2 in La Crosse, Wi. Lisa Kruse and Nick Bakken presented part of their research from a multi-year process and outcome evaluation of the La Crosse County Drug Treatment Court. The evaluation was done in collaboration with the National Center for State Courts and was funded with a Bureau of Justice Assistance Grant.

Submitted on: Aug. 4

Peter Marina

Peter Marina, Sociology & Criminal Justice, authored the article "The (privileged) people who say all cops are “racist” are really the racist part of society" in Law Enforcement Today published on July 30 by Law Enforcement Today. In his attempt to reach out to people on all sides of the political spectrum to advance human rights policing in the U.S., Marina gives his take on policing and projection to a largely conservative audience. Instead of blaming police for racism, maybe privileged people need to examine the ugly shadows they cast onto the faces of others.

Submitted on: Aug. 4