Colorful, raised hands displaying the words: Equality, Freedom, Peace, Hope, Dignity, Rule of Law, Prosperity, Justice.
Summer 2022 expanding section

Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Courses

ERS 100  Introduction to Ethnic and Racial Studies - Cr. 3 

An examination of the persistence of minority and ethnic problems in the United States and consideration of the contributions, parallels, similarities, and differences between and among ethnic and minority groups. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

RGS/SOC 150 Introduction to Social Justice - Cr. 3

Students in this course will examine the concept of social justice through an intersectional and multidisciplinary lens. Students will begin with a critical investigation of the connections between the individual, the local, and the structural as they relate to justice and inequality in society. Social justice strategies are then evaluated, in case study fashion, through the lenses of gender, race, and class structures. (Cross-listed with RGS/SOC; may only earn credit in one department.)

Fall 2022 expanding section

Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Courses

+ Denotes General Education Course

+ ERS 100 Introduction to Ethnic and Racial Studies Cr. 3 

An examination of the persistence of minority and ethnic problems in the United States and consideration of the contributions, parallels, similarities, and differences between and among ethnic and minority groups. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

+RGS 100 Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Class Cr. 3

This course provides an introduction to how race, gender, sexuality, and class have been intertwined and coexisted over time to produce and reproduce social inequalities in the US, in the context of a globally connected world. It explores the key concepts, theories, and historical experiences that form the basis of scholarly work in comparative race, gender, sexuality, and class studies. The creation, transmittal, interpretation, and institutionalization of racial, gender, sexual, and class identities are examined through a human rights framework. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

RGS/SOC 105 Introduction to LGBT Studies Cr. 3

This course will examine the cultural, legal, and political dimensions of LGBT life in the U.S. It will begin by exploring the social invention of heterosexuality and how personal and institutional interpretations of sexuality have historically informed the lives of LGBT people. The course also addresses class, racial and gender biases that especially confront queer communities of color in the U.S. Finally, the course looks at continued instances of hate crimes and homophobia against the backdrop of rights-based activism and the role that art and politics play in this interplay. (Cross-listed with SOC/RGS; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Annually. Instructor: Willem VanRoosenbeek

RGS 307 Ethnic, Racial, and Gender Stereotypes in the Media Cr. 3

This course will trace how popular entertainment mediums such as film, television, books, comics, "wild west shows," music and cartoons have impacted perceptions of ethnic and racial groups from the early seventeenth century to the present. Besides analyzing the persuasive power of these types of mediums, it will examine why such representations were created and why they still persist. Often these racialized images are equally rooted in gender, class, and sexualized identities and this will be explored as well. The mythopoeic image that surrounds Indigenous Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinx, and other minority groups will be juxtaposed against the historical reality that these groups have faced and the contemporary inequalities that we still must confront. Prerequisite(s): ERS 100 or RGS 100 or WGS 100. Offered Fall, Spring. Instructor: Shuma Iwai

RGS 314 Race, Gender, and Sport Cr. 3

Sport has long occupied a place at the heart of American culture and society. Organized athletics have also served as symbolic sites of protest, power, and inclusion for the nation's populations marginalized, oppressed, and discriminated against based on their racial, gender, and sexual identities. This course will explore the terrain of American sport in the twentieth century as a way to understand the profound impact that the phenomenon of athletic competition has had in the development of American race and gender relations. We will pay particular attention to how the racial, gender, and sexual identities of African American, Native American, Latino/a, and Asian American athletes shaped the purposes, participation, and meaning of sport. Moreover, we will delve into the events, icons, and cultural meanings of sports over the last century. Prerequisite(s): ERS 100 or RGS 100 or WGS 100. Instructor: Richard Breaux

RGS 320 Violence and Gender Cr. 3

This course will examine the connections between gendered violence and power distributions within our society using an interdisciplinary and intersectional perspective. Three specific types of violence and abuse will be examined in-depth: sexual harassment, intimate partner violence, and sexual assault. Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing. Offered alternate years. Instructor: Terry Lilley

RGS 374 Poverty as Public Policy Cr. 3

Is poverty something that capitalism produces or the fuel on which it runs? This course analyzes the historical underpinnings to the creation and evolution of welfare policy with special attention paid to the ways gender, race, and class oppression have shaped welfare in the past and today. Wage differentials, occupational segregation, unpaid work, and gendered and racial violence are discussed in relation to the construction of poverty. Current welfare policy will be analyzed and suggestions for reform based on current research will be developed by the class. Offered alternate years. Instructor: Terry Lilley