REC 150 Cr.3

Foundations of Recreation

Review of the sociological, philosophical, economic, and historical aspects of recreation and leisure. An introduction to recreation as a profession and investigation of contemporary issues in recreation and leisure. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 151 Cr.1

Introduction to Recreation Management

This course serves as an introduction to the field of recreation management focusing on the exploration of career areas in the profession and the service delivery systems which define recreation management. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 201 Cr.3

Outdoor Adventure Leadership

In this course, students will gain knowledge about the history and philosophy of outdoor adventure leadership. Along with examining the interrelationship between leisure behavior and the natural environment, administrative functions such as staffing, risk management, and transportation while in the outdoors will be discussed. Students will receive the knowledge and opportunity to experience the basics of some outdoor adventure activities, such as rock climbing, bouldering, mountain biking, orienteering, ropes course, kayaking, canoeing, etc. Students are expected to synthesize research, lecture, experiential, and reading components of course into assignments which demonstrates an understanding of outdoor adventure leadership. Prerequisite: REC 150, REC 151. Offered Fall.

REC 204 Cr.3

Introduction to Outdoor Education

This course introduces students to the regional ecology and engages them with specific ecological niches, e.g. wetland, forest, prairie and riverine, which frequently serve as outdoor recreation contexts. Students will learn about regional native and non-native plants, fauna and associated natural history while developing ecological observational and recording skills for the purpose of applying this information to outdoor recreation and education programming. Offered Fall.

REC 215 Cr.3

Introduction to Community Recreation

This course provides an overview of community-based recreation including municipal and non-profit recreation agencies. The course will focus on the history, legalities, complexities and unique needs of managing community based recreation. Offered Spring.

REC 301 Cr.3

Leadership and Programming in Recreation

This course provides practical knowledge and experiences on the essential elements and design concepts of program planning. Emphasis is placed on student involvement in planning and directing programs for diverse populations in a variety of physical settings. Prerequisite: REC 150, REC 151; REC major/minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 304 Cr.3

Maintenance of Recreation Facilities

An introduction to maintenance of recreation facilities, parks and outdoor recreation areas and the efficient operation and management of aquatic facilities. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

REC 305 Cr.2

Operation and Management of Swimming Pools and Spas

The efficient operation and management of swimming pools, spas, and other aquatic facilities. The promotion of attractive aquatic programs. Prerequisite: junior standing; REC major/minor or ESS-sport management major. Offered Fall - Odd Numbered Years.

REC 306 Cr.3

Environmental Ethics, Outdoor Recreation and Natural Resources

This course provides an overview of the natural resources used for outdoor recreational pursuits, an analysis of leisure activities dependent upon natural resources, a presentation of the problems of recreational land use and an introduction to environmental awareness and outdoor safety. Recreation and natural resources at the national, state, local and private levels will be addressed with emphasis on the understanding of how outdoor recreation affects and is affected by natural resources. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 310 Cr.3

Youth Development in the Recreation Profession

This course provides an overview of the theories and processes that form the foundation for youth services in the field of recreation in the United States. The course will explore the history of youth development with an acute focus on the theories and practices necessary for implementing strategic and effective youth development recreation programs. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

REC 315 Cr.3

Contemplative Leisure

This course utilizes natural environments as a venue for experientially teaching recreation management students the role of contemplative leisure in a complete and balanced lifestyle. Students will explore and experientially implement a variety of contemplative practices and group processing and debriefing theories, techniques and models. Prerequisite: REC 301; REC major/minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 320 Cr.3

Introduction to Tourism

An introduction to the nature and scope of tourism that is intimately related to recreation. This course provides a basic understanding of tourism from the tourism system perspective. The topics include tourist behavior, special-interest tourism, destination marketing, economic, social-cultural, and environmental impacts of tourism on a destination, and sustainable tourism development. In addition to the business and economic benefits of tourism, it also examines the social aspects of tourism. Offered Spring.

REC 325 Cr.3

Leisure in a Diverse Society

This course explores the increasingly diversified nature of society and its impact on individuals’ experiences of leisure. A focus will be placed on the experiences of members of minority populations including issues related to race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, social status, age, and disability. Students will be introduced to factors that influence the experience of leisure and leisure service delivery. Prerequisite: REC major/minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 330 Cr.3

Recreation Resource Management

Students will explore the interactions between natural resources and users to produce outdoor recreation. Students will learn to assess natural resources through carrying capacity, limits of acceptable change, competition, and complementarity among and between recreation uses and other resource uses. Methods for monitoring recreational impacts and approaches to managing resource quality and recreational opportunities will be addressed. Prerequisite: REC 150, REC 151. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

REC 335 Cr.3

Environmental Education

Based on experiential education and interpretive principles, students will learn methods and materials for effectively teaching environmental concepts in schools, communities, nature centers, camps, and parks. Students will also explore history, theory, philosophy and goals of environmental education programs. Prerequisite: REC 150, REC 151; REC 204 or concurrent enrollment. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

REC 340 Cr.3

Evaluation Methods and Practices

This course is designed to familiarize the student with basic measurement and evaluation methods used in recreation and leisure service field. In addition, the course shows students how to interpret current and future research findings in leisure and recreation journals, use basic quantitative and qualitative survey methods, interpret findings from commonly used research and statistical methods, and form conclusions and recommendations from survey findings. Prerequisite: STAT 145; ENG 307; REC major/minor. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

REC 345 Cr.3

Ecotourism

Students will examine theories, policies and practices specific to nature-based tourism. We will consider both the tourist and host community perspectives as we explore opportunities and constraints related to ecotourism development including social, environmental and economic outcomes. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

REC 351 Cr.3

Civic Engagement in the Recreation Profession

Recreation professionals need to be leaders in their communities and advocates for quality recreation and leisure. This course 1.) explores the recreation profession's role in civic engagement and 2.) identifies ways that the general citizenry can be brought into public discussion on issues about recreation programs and facilities. Prerequisite: junior standing; REC major. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 375 Cr.1-3

Workshop in Recreation Management

This is a group study of various recreation, leisure, or tourism topics. University professors and/or visiting lecturers will conduct the workshops. Repeatable for credit under different subtitles. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. May require field trip. Prerequisite: REC or RTH major/minor. No student may earn more than six credits in REC 375, RTH 490, REC 491, and RTH 491. Offered Occasionally.

REC 390 Cr.3

Principles of Management in Recreation

Study of theories and techniques in leadership, group dynamics, and personnel management as they relate to programming and staff supervision in recreation agencies. Emphasis on personnel management techniques, including job analysis, recruitment, selection training, motivation, career development, and evaluation of paid staff and volunteers. Course includes issues common to full-time entry-level professional positions in recreation. Prerequisite: junior standing; REC major/minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 400/500 Cr.3

Planning for Park and Recreation Facilities

Designed to equip the student with the basic knowledge necessary to understand and implement the planning process in the development of park and recreation facilities. This course is also designed to familiarize the student with federal, state and local statutes, and other related documents (U.S. Census, Wisconsin Administrative Codes, county and municipal ordinances). Prerequisite: REC 301 or RTH 456; REC major/minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 402/502 Cr.3

Risk Management in Leisure Service Organizations

This course will identify the primary components of risk management and deals with the legal aspects of tort liability and contracts in leisure service organizations. It is designed to equip students with the basic knowledge necessary to understand and manage legal risks associated with leisure service organizations. Prerequisite: REC 390 or concurrent enrollment; REC major/minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 404/504 Cr.3

Budgeting in the Recreation Enterprise

Emphasis is placed on budget development, implementation and management decision-making within the recreation and park enterprise. This course introduces students to various contextual operational budgets within governmental and non-profit enterprises. Prerequisite: ACC 221; ECO 110; REC 390 or concurrent enrollment; REC major/minor. Offered Fall.

REC 405 Cr.3

Sustainable Tourism Development

This course will examine sustainable theories, policies, and practices in tourism. Students will learn about tourism planning and development from a sustainable tourism perspective. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

REC 415 Cr.3

Camp Administration

This course provides an overview of the history of the camping movement and its evolution over time. In addition, the course will provide foundational knowledge necessary to successfully operate a summer camp including day-to-day operations, staffing, camp counseling, and camp program activities. Prerequisite: REC 150, REC 151. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

REC 420/520 Cr.3

Revenue Management in Recreation Enterprises

This course covers prices and pricing from both managerial and behavioral perspectives in recreation, parks, and tourism settings. While the managerial aspects of pricing include pricing policy/strategy and revenue management (defined as selling perishable service products to the right customer at the right time for the right price), the behavioral aspects include psychology of pricing, price fairness, price perceptions, and willingness-to-pay for non-market goods. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: ACC 221; junior standing. Offered Fall.

REC 445 Cr.3

Meetings, Conventions, and Event Planning

This course will advance students’ understanding of the event management profession. The course is intended to expose students to planning and management aspects in the areas of meetings, conventions, and other special events, while gaining an understanding of how special events impact tourism. Students will learn the professional skills necessary to plan, manage, and evaluate the success of a meeting, convention, or large-scale special event. Prerequisite: REC 301 or RTH 456. Offered Fall.

REC 449 Cr.1

Internship/Professional Preparation

In-depth coverage of the requirements for REC 450 internship and preparation of students for a smooth transition to the recreation management profession. Prerequisite: REC major; senior standing; completion of a minimum of two 50 hour experiences in recreation or parks; a minimum GPA of 2.50; and completion or concurrent enrollment in all remaining 300 and 400 level REC required courses except for REC 450. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 450 Cr.12-16

Internship

Internship with a university approved recreation business or agency. An on-site practitioner and university faculty supervisor closely supervise the student's progress. The student experiences a smooth transition from university academics to the recreation management profession. Approved sites include public sector (e.g., parks and recreation agencies, public schools and universities); non-profit/private sector (e.g., voluntary and youth agencies, church organizations); and for-profit sector (e.g., fitness/sport centers, hospitality, tourism, and retail businesses). Prerequisite: REC 449; REC major; senior standing; 2.50 cum UWL GPA or 3.00 for placement outside of 250-mile radius; all required REC courses completed. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

REC 481/581 Cr.1-3

Outdoor Pursuits

This course provides skill development and leadership techniques in outdoor recreation activities commonly associated with wilderness and roadless areas. Emphasis on backcountry ethics and safety will be stressed. A field trip will be required. Examples: backpacking, canoeing, bicycling, rock climbing, fishing, camping, and/or cross country skiing. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Occasionally.

REC 491/591 Cr.1-3

Workshops in Recreation and Parks

Group study of varying recreation and parks topics. University professors as well as visiting lecturers will be invited to address the students and conduct specialized phases of the workshops. Repeatable for credit under different topics. Prerequisite: junior standing; REC or RTH major/minor. No student may earn more than six credits in REC 375, RTH 490, REC 491, and RTH 491. Offered Occasionally.

REC 495 Cr.1-3

Independent Study in Recreation

Individualized study of areas not available in existing courses. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: junior standing; REC or RTH major/minor. Consent of instructor. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 497 Cr.1-3

Special Projects in Recreation Management

Individualized study of areas not available in existing courses or independent study. Program Project: planning, implementation and evaluation of a project. These projects will be completed under the supervision and direction of a staff member with permission from the student’s advisor within the department. Examples include Camp Placement Day, Riverfest, and Oktoberfest events. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: RTH 493; junior standing; REC or RTH major/minor. Consent of student’s advisor. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring.

REC 499 Cr.1-3

Seminar in Recreation

Intensive study of some specific area of interest in recreation. Repeatable for credit - maximum 3. Prerequisite: minimum 2.75 GPA; senior standing; REC or RTH major/minor. Offered Occasionally.

RTH 250 Cr.3

Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation

This course is designed as an introduction to the history and foundations of therapeutic recreation. Models of health care/human services and therapeutic recreation are presented. Students will gain knowledge of services and settings; professional, legal and community resources; professional and ethical behavior. Prerequisite: REC 150 (may be taken concurrently if student has earned 30 credits or more). Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 252 Cr.3

Innovative Activities in Therapeutic Recreation

This course acquaints students who will work with persons with disabilities and special needs in therapeutic recreation settings with various recreation activities to enhance functional skills and foster meaningful recreation participation. Activity selection, analysis, planning, and modifications will be combined with various leadership styles. Prerequisite: admission to therapeutic recreation program. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 314 Cr.3

Adaptive Sports and Therapeutic Recreation

This course will provide an introduction to how therapeutic recreation specialists use adaptive sports, recreation, and leisure activities for individuals with disabilities to meet treatment goals and improve quality of life. Emphasis is given to the history and rules of a variety of adaptive sports, and possible settings where these could take place. The examination of each sport will include a focus on its connection to the therapeutic recreation profession. Prerequisite: admission to the therapeutic recreation program; RTH 329. Offered Spring.

RTH 319 Cr.3

Management Functions in Therapeutic Recreation

This course provides students with perspectives on the management of therapeutic recreation services. The class will focus on first-line therapeutic recreation managers and the areas of management identified by the National Council of Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC). In-depth coverage is given to the five basic functions of management: planning, organization, staffing, influencing, and controlling. In addition, modules will be provided on key concepts integral to the management of therapeutic recreation programs, including internship supervision, clinical supervision, volunteer management, and managing marketing. Prerequisite: admission to therapeutic recreation program. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 325 Cr.2

Inclusive Recreation

This course is designed to provide the student with information regarding the general techniques and guidelines for planning and implementing recreational activities for persons with disabilities in non-institutional settings. The course will present general background, characteristics of disabling conditions, legislation, and program adaptations. Prerequisite: REC 200. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 326 Cr.3

Therapeutic Recreation Populations I

This course provides knowledge of illnesses and disabilities, including etiology, characteristics, abilities, potentials and limitations. Programming guidelines include adaptations and techniques for inclusion in therapeutic recreation services and the community. The following groups are included: persons with spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, aging, stroke, cancer, diabetes, visual impairment, hearing impairment, cardiac dysfunction, HIV/ AIDS, COPD, amputation, corrections, cultural competence, and others. RTH 326 may precede or follow RTH 327. Prerequisite: admission to therapeutic recreation program. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 327 Cr.3

Therapeutic Recreation Populations II

This course provides knowledge of illness and disabilities, including etiology, characteristics, abilities, potentials and limitations. Programming guidelines include adaptations and techniques for inclusion in therapeutic recreation services and the community. The following groups are included: persons with intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, pediatrics, autism, epilepsy, spina bifida, ADHD, depression, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, chemical dependency, and others. RTH 327 may precede or follow RTH 326. Prerequisite: admission to therapeutic recreation program. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RTH 329 Cr.3

Diagnostic Groups in Therapeutic Recreation

This course provides an understanding of the International Classification of Function Disability and Health (ICF) from the World Health Organization (WHO) framework for classifying the consequences of disease into diagnostic groups. The language of the ICF is neutral as to etiology, placing the emphasis on function rather than condition or disease. It also is carefully designed to be relevant across cultures as well as age groups and genders. A broad working knowledge of a variety of diagnostic groups and therapeutic recreation interventions for each will be provided. A focus on symptomology, etiology, prognosis, and remediation using therapeutic recreation interventions is included. In addition, how illness and disability affects the family will be discussed. Prerequisite: admission to therapeutic recreation program. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RTH 330 Cr.3

Therapeutic Recreation and Mental Health

This course is designed to provide students with information regarding therapeutic recreation services to persons behavioral health issues and their families. Emphasis on characteristics of diagnostic groups, activities to facilitate change in different behavioral domains, therapeutic interventions for adults and children, treatment settings and services, and trends in program delivery. Prerequisite: RTH 250; RTH 329; RTH major/minor or CYC minor. Offered Spring.

RTH 332 Cr.3

Therapeutic Recreation for Persons With Physical Disabilities

This course is designed to provide students with information relating to therapeutic recreation services for individuals with physical disabilities. Programming considerations will include treatment concerns, community inclusion, wheelchair sports and leisure activities. Prerequisite: RTH 250, RTH 329; RTH major/minor. Offered Occasionally.

RTH 333 Cr.3

Therapeutic Recreation and Corrections

This course provides an overview of the use of leisure and recreation for individuals in correctional settings. The following topics are addressed: settings, psychiatric disorders, laws/juvenile codes, intervention strategies, activity adaptations, current trends and the criminal justice system. Functional improvement, leisure education and recreation participation are the focus of therapeutic recreation services. Prerequisite: RTH 250 or RTH 329; RTH major/minor or CYC minor. Offered Fall.

RTH 345 Cr.3

Recreational Therapy for Older Adults

This course teaches students to facilitate psychosocial intervention to address needs, strategies, techniques, and approaches for older adults with chronic health conditions through health promotion and leisure activities. Prerequisite: RTH 250, RTH 329. Offered Spring.

RTH 355 Cr.3

Medical Language

An introduction to medical terminology with emphasis on word roots, combining forms, prefixes and suffixes through the various systems. There is also a unit on basic pharmacology. Prerequisite: admission to therapeutic recreation program. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RTH 456/556 Cr.3

Program Design and Administration of Therapeutic Recreation

This course is designed to present a rationale and foundation for systematic program design, program implementation and program evaluation in various therapeutic recreation settings. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: STAT 145; RTH 329; junior standing; RTH major or inclusive recreation minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 462/562 Cr.3

Inclusive Recreation Program Administration

This course is designed to provide the student with information relating to recreation in inclusive settings. General Administration concepts, management concepts, advocacy, legislation, and therapeutic recreation as a related service in the schools will receive special emphasis in this course. Prerequisite: RTH 456; junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 470/570 Cr.3

Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation

This course presents an overview of concepts and interaction techniques used in the provision of goal-oriented therapeutic recreation services. Included are counseling techniques, leadership and instructional techniques appropriate for use in treatment, leisure education and recreation participation. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: STAT 145; RTH 329; RTH 456 or concurrent enrollment; junior standing; RTH major/minor or CYC minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 476/576 Cr.3

Assessment and Treatment Planning-Therapeutic Recreation

Overview of individual client assessments used in therapeutic recreation practice; development of individualized treatment/program plans in a therapeutic recreation context; review resources, standards and issues related to client assessment and program planning in therapy, leisure education and recreation participation programs. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: RTH 456, RTH 470; junior standing; RTH major. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 480/580 Cr.3

Leisure Education

This course is designed to provide a philosophical understanding and overview of leisure education as well as to emphasize the approaches and strategies that can be utilized in enabling people to enhance the quality of their own lives in leisure. The focus will be leisure education as a major component of therapeutic recreation services. Topics included are leisure theory, leisure education conceptual models, leisure education programming techniques, facilitation of leisure education groups for various ages. Gerontology students should have completed one core gerontology course and have permission from the director of therapeutic recreation. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: RTH 456, RTH 470; junior standing; RTH major/minor or GTL emphasis. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 490 Cr.1-3

Workshop in Therapeutic Recreation

Group study of varying therapeutic recreation topics. University professors as well as visiting lecturers will be invited to address the students and conduct specialized phases of the workshops. Repeatable for credit under different subtitles. Prerequisite: RTH major plan. No student may earn more than six credits in REC 375, RTH 490, REC 491, and RTH 491. Offered Occasionally.

RTH 491/591 Cr.1-3

Workshop in Therapeutic Recreation

Group study of varying therapeutic recreation topics. University professors as well as visiting lecturers will be invited to address the students and conduct specialized phases of the workshops. Repeatable for credit under different subtitles. No student may earn more than six credits in REC 375, RTH 490, REC 491, and RTH 491. Offered Occasionally.

RTH 493/593 Cr.3

Therapeutic Recreation Trends and Issues

This course provides an examination of current issues, trends and professionalization concerns in therapeutic recreation, including professional organizations, ethics, current legislation, professional development, professional standards, credentialing, accreditation standards, improving organizational performance, and current professional controversies. Course should be taken the last semester prior to internship. This course is taught largely at an undergraduate level. Graduate students will have additional course requirements/expectations. Prerequisite: STAT 145, RTH 456; junior standing; RTH major. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 495 Cr.1-3

Independent Study in Therapeutic Recreation

Individualized study of areas not available in existing courses. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: RTH major. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RTH 496 Cr.1

Orientation to Internship in Therapeutic Recreation

Orientation and preparation to the required senior internship. Course should be taken one or two semesters prior to enrollment in RTH 498. 50 hours of pre-internship experience must be verified with at least a satisfactory rating prior to enrolling. Prerequisite: accepted into the RTH major; junior standing; verified 50 hours of pre-internship experience. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Fall, Spring.

RTH 497 Cr.1-3

Special Projects in Therapeutic Recreation

Individualized study areas not available in existing courses or Independent Study. Program Project: the planning, implementation and evaluation of a project. These projects will be completed under the supervision and direction of a staff member with permission from the student’s adviser within the department. Examples: wheelchair sports/coaching, wheel-a-thon, special recreation programs, Special Olympics, wheelchair dancing, and other events. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: RTH 456; junior standing; consent of student’s advisor; RTH major. Consent of instructor. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RTH 498 Cr.12-16

Internship in Therapeutic Recreation

Application of the methods and techniques of therapeutic recreation, leadership, program development and administration through a supervised internship experience in therapeutic recreation, special recreation, leisure education and/or treatment programs. Prerequisite: senior standing; RTH major, all required REC/RTH courses completed; 2.50 cum GPA (3.00 outside of 250 mile radius). American Red Cross Standard First Aid certification or its equivalent must be current throughout the RTH 498 experience. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

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