ARA 101 Cr.4

Elementary Arabic I

This course will acquaint students with the working vocabulary, dialogue skills, and pronunciation needed for elementary Arabic reading and writing. Linguistic development will include basic listening skills, elementary conversation, appreciation of the many Arabic dialects, and knowledge of Arab culture. Offered Fall.

+ARA 102 Cr.4

Elementary Arabic II

This is the second semester of first year Arabic. This course is designed to reinforce and build upon what was covered during the first semester. The 5Cs of communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities are at the center of the course. The course will be taught using a communicative approach, meaning that our focus is on real-world situations in which you can use the language in meaningful ways. Prerequisite: ARA 101. Offered Spring.

+ARA 201 Cr.4

Intermediate Arabic I

This course will be a continuation of the first-year, introductory courses in spoken and written Arabic. Prerequisite: ARA 102. Offered Fall.

+ARA 202 Cr.4

Intermediate Arabic II

This course will continue to develop the skills previously acquired and increase knowledge about syntactical and morphological structures of Modern Standard Arabic. The overall goal of this course is to increase students' proficiency level and enable students to do more with the Arabic language. Successful completion of this course would provide students with the groundwork for rapidly advancing in the Arabic language and the tools for further study and research in a formal classroom setting or on their own. Prerequisite: ARA 201. Offered Spring.

CHI 100 Cr.1

Basic Spoken Chinese

This is a one-credit course designed to introduce the fundamentals of spoken Chinese. This course will focus solely on speaking and listening in Chinese and will not teach written Chinese. All vocabulary and texts will be in the standard Romanization of Chinese (Pin Yin). The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the Chinese pronunciation system and to carry on simple conversations on topics related to college and daily life. Offered Spring.

CHI 101 Cr.4

Elementary Chinese I

The first of two introductory courses, this course familiarizes students with the Chinese pronunciation and writing systems and develops their basic communicative competence in the four skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It also develops students' cross-cultural awareness while building communicative strategies. Offered Fall.

+CHI 102 Cr.4

Elementary Chinese II

This course further develops basic communicative competence in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It also develops students' cross-cultural awareness while building their communicative strategies. Prerequisite: CHI 101 or placement. Offered Spring.

+CHI 201 Cr.4

Intermediate Chinese I

This course continues to develop students' communicative competence in the four skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It also develops students' cross-cultural awareness and competence while building communicative strategies. Prerequisite: CHI 102 or placement. Offered Fall.

+CHI 202 Cr.4

Intermediate Chinese II

The second of two intermediate-level Chinese courses, this course continues to develop students' communicative competence in the four skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing. It also develops students' cross-cultural awareness and competence while building their communicative strategies. Prerequisite: CHI 201 or placement. Offered Spring.

CHI 301 Cr.3

Advanced Chinese

This is a Chinese language course for intermediate level learners who have completed CHI 202 or equivalent. Its aim is to help students continue to develop communicative competence in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing the Chinese language. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course. Prerequisite: CHI 202 or equivalent. Offered Fall.

+CHI 305 Cr.3

Introduction to Modern Chinese Literature

This course provides a general survey of the most important Chinese writers of the 20th century and their works. Literary works are discussed in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. Taught in English and based entirely on translated texts, the course is ideal for students with little or no Chinese background who are nevertheless drawn to one of the most vibrant literary cultures in the world. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

CHI 315 Cr.3

Business Chinese

This course is aimed to enhance students' language skills in a business context and to promote their understanding of culture and the business environment in contemporary China. Intensive practice in oral comprehension, speaking, writing, utilizing special, topical vocabulary related to international commerce and interaction in a variety of business settings. Prerequisite: CHI 202 or equivalent. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

+CHI 320 Cr.3

Introduction to Chinese Civilization

This is a survey course covering the development of Chinese civilization from the beginnings to the 20th century. It introduces the evolution and continuities of this ancient culture seen through the lens of philosophy, religion, ritual, social relations, institutions, and achievements. This course is taught in English for students who want a basic appreciation of this important non-Western culture. No experience with the Chinese language or culture is required. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

CHI 326 Cr.1

Current Events

A weekly discussion of current events in the Chinese-speaking world, based on readings, web-based news sources and television broadcasts in the target language. Students may take as many times as desired, but only three credits will count towards major/minor. Prerequisite: CHI 202 or equivalent. Offered Fall, Spring.

CHI 398 Cr.1-3

Directed Studies

Individual reading and investigations in advanced Chinese study. Course materials will vary according to the needs and interests of students. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: CHI 202 or equivalent. Offered Occasionally.

FRE 101 Cr.3

Elementary French I

The first of two introductory courses in French for students with no knowledge of French, focused on developing the four communicative skills: listening speaking, writing, and reading. Introduction to contemporary Francophone cultures through a variety of topics from everyday life (family, shopping) to the arts (cinema, literature). Offered Fall, Spring.

+FRE 102 Cr.3

Elementary French II

The second introductory courses in French emphasizes the development of practical communication skills using an interactive learning approach and integrates cultures from the Francophone world in language learning to provide students with basic survival skills in a French-speaking country. Prerequisite: FRE 101 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+FRE 201 Cr.3

Intermediate French I

The first of two intermediate-level French courses which provides a review of basic structures while expanding on grammatical structures and vocabulary to allow students to express themselves in meaningful ways both orally and in writing. Cultural competence is integrated in language learning in an interactive manner. Prerequisite: FRE 102 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+FRE 202 Cr.3

Intermediate French II

The second of two intermediate-level French courses which provides a review of basic structures while expanding on grammatical structures and vocabulary to allow students to express viewpoints and opinions on a variety of topics from visual and cultural texts. Prerequisite: FRE 201 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+FRE 220 Cr.3

France and the Francophone World

This course offers both historical and contemporary perspectives on France and its relationship to the Francophone world. Students will examine French history and colonialism and their impact on such regions/countries as Quebec, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Senegal, Tahiti, and the Maghreb (North Africa). This course will also explore the multiple identities (based on ethnicity, race, gender and sexual orientation) that continue to "disrupt" the notion of a collective French consciousness as it persists today. These include North-African and Russian immigrants, Jews, women, gays and lesbians. Taught in English. Offered Spring.

FRE 300 Cr.3

Visual Encounters

This course introduces students to a variety of art and technology-related topics that define French culture today while practicing grammatical structures required to narrate and describe. Analysis of visual artifacts and development of writing skills will take place in contexts such as regional cultures and traditions, culinary arts, cinema, music, art festivals, popular culture, artistic genres, and new technologies. Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent. Offered Fall.

FRE 301 Cr.3

Sound, Speech, and Proficiency

This course first aims to improve students' pronunciation by providing an introduction to the principles of French phonetics and the study of stress, rhythm, and intonation. The course is designed to develop oral interactions through a pragmatic approach to language as students identify and practice different speech acts in their sociocultural contexts, applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational means of communication as defined by the ACTFL guidelines to achieve oral proficiency. Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent. Offered Spring.

FRE 305 Cr.3

Exploring the Story

This course introduces students to a variety of narrative structures in their cultural context. Students will increase their vocabulary, reinforce reading strategies, interpret cultural signifiers, and develop critical thinking skills as they confront the printed word in comics, short stories, fairy-tales, fables, poems, or newspaper articles. Prerequisite: FRE 300 or FRE 301. Offered Fall - Odd Numbered Years.

FRE 307 Cr.3

French for Professional Communication

A course designed to prepare students to communicate effectively in professional contexts. It addresses written and oral conventions in business and other professional settings, determines/compares professional expectations across Francophone and Anglophone cultures, and prepares for all aspects of the job search for a company dealing with Francophone professionals, with a focus on Canadian and European exchanges. Prerequisite: FRE 202 or equivalent. Offered Fall.

FRE 317 Cr.3

Practice in Translation

This course is designed to introduce students to translation techniques, strategies, and theories, which students will apply to a variety of text genres. Focus is on translation from French to English so that students can compare and contrast the structures of French and English as they further their language acquisition. Prerequisite: FRE 300 or FRE 301. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

FRE 320 Cr.3

Perspectives on French Civilization

From historical, chronological, thematic and literary perspectives, this course is designed to provide an examination of French Civilization from its origins to the French Revolution. Topics will include socio-political and cultural history, feudalism, absolutism, the Enlightenment, art, music, literature, and architecture. Prerequisite: FRE 300 or FRE 301. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

FRE 322 Cr.3

French without Borders

The course provides an overview of the Francophone world by defining the notions of "Francophonie" from a cultural, historical, political, and socio-linguistic point of view, with an emphasis on current events. Prerequisite: FRE 300 or FRE 301. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

FRE 337 Cr.3

French 3.0: Focus on Science and Technology

From Pascal’s calculator in 17th century France to Arthur Zang's Cardiopad in contemporary Cameroon, the French-speaking world has produced a number of scientific and technological innovations. This course will focus on discovering Francophone cultures through the lens of a variety of scientific topics. Students will continue developing language proficiency while acquiring the specific discourse and vocabulary related to the scientific professions, including health, technology, and technical work specializations they are most interested in. This course will especially be an asset for students desiring to work or intern for international companies, NGOs, Peace Corps, or do mission work in a Francophone country. Prerequisite: FRE 300 or FRE 307. Offered Every Third Semester.

FRE 351 Cr.3

French Cinema

The course introduces students to film analysis and visual literacy while presenting the development of French cinema in its historical and theoretical context. It also includes a study of film adaptations of various literary genres. Prerequisite: FRE 300 or FRE 301. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

+FRE 395 Cr.3

French Literary Voices in English

This course is designed to be an exploration of Francophone literature using a thematic approach. Students will read, discuss, and write about great texts written in French and translated into English. Texts will include short stories and novels by writers from the classical French canon (e.g., Maupassant, Voltaire, Flaubert, Hugo) and those from the Global French world (e.g., Laye, Memmi, Begag, Ba). Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

FRE 403 Cr.3

Studies in French/Francophone Literature

A course designed to explore social, political, and cultural issues as related in literary works of authors of French-speaking countries. Specific topics vary by semester but may include "Voices from Quebec" or "Francophone Women Writers". Prerequisite: FRE 305 or FRE 351 or FRE 395. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

FRE 430 Cr.3

French Connections

This course is designed for students to explore connections between their French studies and other disciplines. Due to its Interdisciplinary nature and its seminar format, the course content is tailored to students' research paper topics, while focusing on the practice of more complex grammatical structures and academic writing conventions in French. Prerequisite: FRE 300, FRE 301, and FRE 307. Offered Fall.

FRE 450 Cr.1-4

National/International Intern Program

A course in French individually tailored to fit career needs: cultural awareness, technical vocabulary in French to prepare students who elect internship credits in other departments. French majors or minors or other students having the equivalency of FRE 202 may elect to take these credits off campus. Repeatable for credit - maximum four. Prerequisite: a declared major in department offering intern programs or a declared major in French. Offered Occasionally.

FRE 491 Cr.3

Films and Literature

Viewing and criticism of subtitled films and reading their literary sources in translation. Prerequisite: one course in literature from either the Modern Languages or English Department. Offered Occasionally.

FRE 495 Cr.2

Honors Seminar in French

An in-depth examination of a topic in French or Francophone literature or civilization concluding with a research paper and presentation to faculty and peers. Prerequisite: FRE 305; one 400-level literature or civilization course; admission to the Alvida Ahlstrom Honors Program. Offered Occasionally.

FRE 498 Cr.1-3

Independent Study

Fieldwork, research, individual projects in a specific area of French language civilization or literature. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: two advanced french courses; junior standing. Consent of department. Offered Occasionally.

FRE 499 Cr.1-3

Independent Study

Fieldwork, research, individual projects in a specific area of French language, civilization or literature. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: two advanced french courses; junior standing. Consent of department. Offered Occasionally.

GER 101 Cr.4

Elementary German I

The first of two introductory courses in German. The five language skills: listening, speaking, writing, reading, and culture are introduced. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GER 102 Cr.4

Elementary German II

The second introductory course in German comprehension, speaking, writing, reading, and culture. Prerequisite: GER 101 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GER 201 Cr.4

Intermediate German I

The first of two intermediate-level German courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining speaking and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: GER 102 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GER 202 Cr.4

Intermediate German II

The second of two intermediate-level German courses, designed specifically to transition students to upper-level content courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining reading and writing in German. Topics in recent German history and contemporary German society are explored while obtaining a grasp of more complex grammatical structures. Prerequisite: GER 201 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

GER 300 Cr.3

Advanced German

Development of all German language skills with emphasis on reading and writing. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

GER 301 Cr.3

An Introduction to German Literature

A beginning literature course designed to teach the student to read with depth and critical ability. Emphasis will be on German theatre, the short story, and poetry. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

GER 311 Cr.3

German Conversation and Composition

Practice in oral and written German to gain fluency in idiomatic style. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

GER 313 Cr.3

German Grammar and Composition

An intensive study of German grammar and stylistics with an emphasis on controlled compositions. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

GER 315 Cr.3

Business German

A course designed to prepare advanced students in German to communicate effectively in the business world. Intensive practice in oral comprehension, speaking, writing, utilizing special, topical vocabulary related to international commerce. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Strongly recommend MGT 100 or concurrent registration in MGT 100. Offered Occasionally.

GER 320 Cr.3

German Civilization: 1870-Reunification

A topical and contrastive approach to German culture and civilization. A study of the social and political organization of  Germany from 1870 to reunification in 1989, based on an historical perspective with special emphasis on the forces which led to National Socialism and the division of Germany after World War II. Milestones in German cultural history prior to 1870 will be touched on briefly. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Occasionally.

GER 321 Cr.3

German Civilization: 1989-Present

A study of contemporary life in the German-speaking world with particular emphasis on the Federal Republic since unification. Topics include unification, the political system, the educational system, and the geography of the region. The multi-cultural aspects of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland will be highlighted. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Occasionally.

GER 326 Cr.1

Current Events

A weekly discussion of current events in the German-speaking world, based on readings and television broadcasts in the target language. This course is one of four one-credit elective courses offered in the German studies program. A maximum of six credits from a combination of GER 326, GER 327, GER 328, and GER 329 will be applicable to the German majors or minors. (Each individual course can only be taken three times for a total of three credits.) Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Occasionally.

GER 327 Cr.1

Grammar Review

A course designed to provide additional practice and review of German grammar and syntax. Students will engage in focused writing assignments that will allow them to master frequently occurring grammar structures (e.g., past tenses in narration, object pronouns, relative pronouns, adjective endings.) This course is one of four one-credit elective courses offered in the German studies program. A maximum of six credits from a combination of GER 326, GER 327, GER 328, and GER 329 will be applicable to the German majors or minors. (Each individual course can only be taken three times for a total of three credits.) Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Occasionally.

GER 328 Cr.1

Short Stories

A course designed to help students improve their reading and writing skills in German. Through the study of short stories, students will learn reading strategies, build their vocabulary, and review relevant grammar concepts. This course is one of four one-credit elective courses offered in the German studies program. A maximum of six credits from a combination of GER 326, GER 327, GER 328, and GER 329 will be applicable to the German majors or minors. (Each individual course can only be taken three times for a total of three credits.) Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Annually.

GER 330 Cr.3

German Conversation and Phonetics

A study of the German-language sound system. Students learn the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) modeling their speech after native speakers -both live and from recorded materials. Sound patterns are reinforced through conversational exercises which are based upon current events, readings, and cultural nuances. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

GER 351 Cr.4

Films in German

The study of the German-speaking world film viewing, discussion and writing assignments will all be in German. Lect. 3, Lab 2. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. Offered Occasionally.

GER 394 Cr.3

Translating Literature

A study of the theory and problems of literary translation. Students translate literary works from the target language into English. The student translations are used for literary as well as translation technique study in the course. Prerequisite: GER 202. Offered Occasionally.

+GER 398 Cr.3

German Thinkers and Popular Culture

A course that critically examines instances of popular culture such as Hollywood movies, reality TV, pop songs, social media sites, and bestselling novels through the lens of various philosophical traditions. Focusing predominantly on German thinkers from the 18th-20th centuries such as Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Freud, and Benjamin, the course explores how their ideas can help a person today find deeper meaning in pop culture, as well as how pop culture might aid in understanding these thinkers' difficult theories. Taught in English. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

+GER 399 Cr.3

German Literature in Translation

A course designed to introduce students to great works of German literature. The course will center on representative writings by leading authors of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries whose works illustrate important aspects of German history and culture. In general these will be longer works of fiction and/or multiple works by such writers as Kafka, Goethe, Kleist, Mann, Boll, Grass, Wolf, etc. Works and authors will vary. Offered Fall - Odd Numbered Years.

GER 403 Cr.3

Studies of German Literature

A course designed to survey major literary movements and authors. Specific topics vary by semester. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: GER 300 or GER 301. Offered Occasionally.

GER 450 Cr.1-4

National/International Intern Program

A course in German individually tailored to fit career needs: cultural awareness, technical vocabulary in German to prepare students who elect internship credits in other departments. German minors or other students having the equivalency of GER 202 may elect to take these credits off campus. Repeatable for credit - maximum four. Prerequisite: a declared major in department offering intern program or a declared minor in German. Offered Occasionally.

GER 498 Cr.1-3

Independent Study

Fieldwork, research, individual projects in a specific area of German language, civilization or literature. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: two advanced German courses; junior standing. Consent of department. Offered Occasionally.

GER 499 Cr.1-3

Independent Study

Field work, research, and individual projects in a specific area of German language, civilization or literature. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: two advanced German courses; junior standing. Consent of department. Offered Occasionally.

GCL 101 Cr.4

Elementary Languages I

This is the first of two introductory courses in target languages which covers oral and written language study, reading, and grammar. Repeatable for credit in different languages - maximum eight credits. Offered Fall.

+GCL 102 Cr.4

Elementary Languages II

This is the second of two introductory courses in target languages which covers oral and written language study, reading, and grammar. Repeatable for credit in different languages - maximum eight credits. Prerequisite: GCL 101 in the target language. Offered Spring.

+GCL 201 Cr.4

Intermediate Languages I

This is the first of two intermediate level courses that covers oral and written language study, reading, and grammar. Repeatable for credit in different languages - maximum eight credits. Prerequisite: GCL 102 in the target language. Offered Fall.

+GCL 202 Cr.4

Intermediate Languages II

This is the second of two intermediate level courses that covers oral and written language study, reading, and grammar. Repeatable for credit in different languages - maximum eight credits. Prerequisite: GCL 201 in the target language. Offered Spring.

+GCL 299 Cr.3

Global Literature in Translation

The primary focus of this course is on major and representative works originally written in French, German, Russian, Spanish and/or Chinese. The course is taught in English by specialists of the respective literatures. Content and theme vary with instructors. Offered Occasionally.

GCL 300 Cr.3

World Language Education: Field Experience I

This course is designed to equip teacher candidates to understand theoretical and research-based foundations of world language instruction. Through an integrated practicum experience at a local school, candidates will learn about the complex processes of planning discipline-specific world language instruction, engaging students in learning, and assessing student learning. Candidates will further develop understanding and practices related to the topics of teacher performance assessment (edTPA), professionalism, and classroom management. A multi-day, consistent schedule (typically 3 consecutive half days) in the field experience classroom will be established by the course instructor in consultation with the teacher candidate and cooperating teacher. Prerequisite: EDS 203, EDS 206; concurrent enrollment in GCL 400; admission to an EC-A teacher education program (French, German, Spanish ed majors only). Offered Spring.

GCL 310 Cr.3

Theories and Research in Second Language Acquisition

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of second language acquisition. It surveys the different theories of second language acquisition and focuses on connecting theory to practice through student-led undergraduate research projects. In this course, learners will gain foundational knowledge of second language acquisition and related theories and will examine current research trends through the analysis of various empirical studies as related to second language acquisition. Prerequisite: junior standing and one of the following: AP foreign language score of 3 or higher; placement into 201-level or higher foreign language course; score 70 or higher on La Crosse Battery (non-native speakers of English); grade "B" or better in 102-level or higher foreign language course taken at UWL (taught in foreign language). Offered Spring.

GCL 320 Cr.3

World Language Education: Field Experience II

This course is designed to equip teacher candidates to understand theoretical and research-based foundations of world language instruction. Through an integrated practicum experience at a local school, candidates will learn about the complex processes of planning discipline-specific world language instruction, engaging students in learning, and assessing student learning. Candidates will further develop understanding and practices related to the topics of teacher performance assessment (edTPA), professionalism, and classroom management. A multi-day, consistent schedule (typically 3 consecutive half days) in the field experience classroom will be established by the course instructor in consultation with the teacher candidate and the cooperating teacher. Prerequisite: GCL 300; concurrent enrollment with GCL 420; admission to an EC-A (French, German Studies, Spanish only) teacher education program; junior standing. Consent of department. Offered Fall.

GCL 400 Cr.3

Teaching World Languages: Methods and Approaches

This course, taken concurrently with a Field I experience course, is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed as professional world language educators. As the first course in the program’s two-course methods sequence, this course is intended to introduce the student to prominent approaches and methods of language teaching as well as guiding frameworks and essential concepts in the field. Students will connect theory to practice by engaging in introductory activities focused on philosophies of language teaching, unit planning, assessment, and observations. Prerequisite: EDS 351, EDS 402, or concurrent enrollment in GCL 300 (EC-A majors in French, German, Spanish ed only); admission to a teacher education program. Offered Spring.

GCL 420 Cr.3

Teaching World Languages: Design and Application

This course, taken concurrently with a Field II experience course, is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed as professional world language educators. As the second course in the program’s two-course methods sequence, this course will prepare students to design and implement effective world language lessons. Students will connect theory to practice by engaging in applied activities related to lesson and task design, teaching demonstrations, formative assessment, technology integration, and other practical methods. Prerequisite: GCL 300; concurrent enrollment with GCL 320; admission to an EC-A (French, German Studies, or Spanish only) teacher education program; junior standing. Offered Fall.

+HMG 204 Cr.4

Hmong Heritage Language: Intermediate

This course provides opportunities for students to develop intermediate-level Hmong heritage language skills, particularly in reading and writing skills. Students learn the Hmong language writing system in order to read and write short texts, as well as continue to work on oral proficiency skills. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Consent of instructor. Offered Fall.

+HMG 304 Cr.4

Hmong Heritage Language: Advanced

This course provides opportunities for students to develop advanced-level Hmong heritage language reading and writing skills. Students may engage in activities including, but not limited to: exploring Hmong language features related to social customs, reading authentic Hmong language manuscripts, practicing Hmong language narrative and expository writing, and translating documents in their fields. Prerequisite: HMG 204. Consent of instructor. Offered Occasionally.

JPN 101 Cr.4

Elementary Japanese I

This is the first of two introductory courses in Japanese for students with no prior knowledge of this language, focused on developing the four communicative skills: listening, speaking, writing, and reading, with an introduction to Japanese culture through a variety of topics from everyday life (family, shopping) to the arts (cinema, literature). A year of high school study in this language is equivalent to the 101 level. Offered Fall.

+JPN 102 Cr.4

Elementary Japanese II

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence that develops communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as knowledge and understanding towards Japanese culture. The course aims to develop communicative skills in a wide range of contexts with increasing focus on reading and writing communication. The classes are conducted primarily in Japanese and typing in Japanese will be introduced. Prerequisite: JPN 101. Offered Spring.

+JPN 201 Cr.4

Intermediate Japanese I

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence that develops intercultural communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It also aims to develop knowledge and appreciation towards Japanese culture. The classes are conducted primarily in Japanese. Prerequisite: JPN 102. Offered Fall.

+JPN 202 Cr.4

Intermediate Japanese II

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence that develops communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It also develops socio-cultural understanding of Japanese language and society. Prerequisite: JPN 201. Offered Spring.

MLG 110 Cr.3

Introduction to the Study of Languages

An investigation of the nature, function, and characteristics of romance and germanic languages compared linguistically with English and other languages. Offered Occasionally.

MLG 398 Cr.1-4

World Languages: Advanced

Advanced study of less commonly taught world languages. Instruction may be offered on an individualized basis or through distance education when a course is available on another campus. Repeatable for credit - maximum eight. Prerequisite: MLG 202 in the appropriate language. Offered Occasionally.

RUS 101 Cr.4

Elementary Russian I

The first of two introductory courses in Russian. The five language skills: listening, speaking, writing, reading and culture are introduced. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

+RUS 102 Cr.4

Elementary Russian II

The second introductory course in Russian comprehension, speaking, writing, reading and culture. Prerequisite: RUS 101 or placement. Offered Spring.

+RUS 201 Cr.4

Intermediate Russian I

The first of two intermediate-level Russian courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining speaking and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: RUS 102 or placement. Offered Fall.

+RUS 202 Cr.4

Intermediate Russian II

The second of two intermediate-level Russian courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining reading and writing in Russian. Prerequisite: RUS 201 or placement. Offered Spring.

+RUS 305 Cr.3

Golden Age Russian Literature and Culture

A course designed to introduce students to the great Russian writers of the 19th century, a period referred to as the Golden Age of Russian literature. Literary works will be discussed in their social, cultural, and historical context. The course will center on works by such writers as Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. Taught in English. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

RUS 320 Cr.3

The Russian Mindset: Cultural Perspectives

A topical approach to Russian culture and civilization, this course is designed to provide an examination of Russian socio-political and cultural history, art themes, geographical composition, and human settlement. The role and effects of leaders and personas in Russian history (Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Stalin) will also be analyzed. Students will further develop language skills by practicing grammatical structures and lexical items required to describe and analyze cultural products, practices, and perspectives. Prerequisite: RUS 202 or equivalent. Offered Spring.

RUS 351 Cr.3

Russian Identity through Film

This course is an intermediate-language course exploring the topic of Russian identity through contemporary Russian films. Adhering to the World Readiness Standards for Learning Languages (produced by ACTFL), the course will allow students to develop cultural competences and make connections with other disciplines such as political science and history. Students will further develop language skills by practicing grammatical structures and lexical items required to narrate plots, summarize films, describe characters, and analyze film themes. Prerequisite: RUS 202 or equivalent. Offered Fall.

RUS 398 Cr.1-3

Directed Studies

Individual reading and investigations in advanced Russian study. Course materials will vary according to the needs and interests of students. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: RUS 202 or equivalent. Offered Occasionally.

SPA 101 Cr.4

Spanish in a Global Society I

This course is the first of two introductory courses in Spanish. The five language skills are introduced: listening, speaking, writing, reading and culture. (Not open to students with more than two years of high school Spanish.) Offered Summer.

+SPA 102 Cr.4

Spanish in a Global Society II

This is the second introductory course in Spanish comprehension, speaking, writing, reading, and culture. Prerequisite: SPA 101 or placement based on UW System Spanish Placement Test score. Offered Fall, Spring.

+SPA 103 Cr.4

Spanish in a Global Society I & II

This is an introductory course that covers in one semester the essential content of first-year Spanish. It is designed for students with two or more years of high school Spanish or with previous experience learning a foreign language. Special emphasis is placed on facilitating the development of oral communication. Prerequisites: students with no evidence of prior study of Spanish are required to begin at SPA 103. Not open to students with credit in SPA 101 or SPA 102 (or equivalent). Offered Fall, Spring.

+SPA 201 Cr.4

Spanish Language and Cultures in Action I

This course is the first of two intermediate-level Spanish courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining speaking and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: SPA 102 or SPA 103 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+SPA 202 Cr.4

Spanish Language and Cultures in Action II

This course is the second of two intermediate-level Spanish courses, designed specifically to transition students to upper-level content courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining reading and writing in Spanish. Topics in Spanish culture history and contemporary Spanish speaker countries society are explored while obtaining a grasp of more complex grammatical structure. Prerequisite: SPA 201 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 300 Cr.4

Oral Proficiency Through Grammar Review

This is a Spanish language course for intermediate-level learners who have completed SPA 202 or equivalent. Its aim is to help students continue to develop communicative competence. Although students will practice reading and writing, emphasis will be placed on speaking and grammar review. The target level for student proficiency is Intermediate-High/Advanced Low on the ACTFL scale. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equivalent, or appropriate departmental placement. Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 302 Cr.3

Faces of Spain: Conversation and Culture

This course is an introduction to the concepts of diversity and social responsibility through the study of the construction of national identity in Spain. A main focus will be on describing these themes in their social and cultural contexts, especially through the analysis of films in Spanish. This course explores issues related to origins of Spanish identity, diversity in communities, changing social structures, and independence movements. Students will also develop all four language skills, with an emphasis on oral proficiency (focusing on listening and speaking), along with critical thinking. Prerequisite: SPA 202. Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 305 Cr.3

Introduction to Hispanic Literature

An introductory literature course designed both for students desiring to develop an appreciation of Hispanic literature and those planning to pursue more advanced courses requiring a critical background. The course may include works from the following genres: narrative, poetry, drama and essay. Prerequisite: SPA 300 or (SPA 303 and SPA 304). Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

SPA 307 Cr.3

Diverse Stories: Reading for Social Responsibility

This course introduces students to a variety of genres in their cultural context. Among the genres explored may be comics, graphic novels, legends, short stories, poetry, newspaper articles, and the novel. In addition, students will build their vocabulary, employ reading strategies, develop writing skills, practice narrative analysis, and create their own short narratives. All readings in the course will emphasize diversity and social responsibility. Prerequisite: SPA 202. Offered Fall.

SPA 308 Cr.3

Cultures and Civilizations of the Spanish Speaking World

A study of Spanish-speaking cultures and civilizations using a topical, thematic-based curriculum and following a research- and standards-based approach to the pedagogy of culture. A main focus of the course is the development of intercultural competence with the goal of helping students to achieve a greater level of critical awareness of their own culture and those of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SPA 300 or (SPA 303 and SPA 304). Offered Annually.

SPA 310 Cr.3

Exploring Communities: Understanding Culture

For Spanish majors and minors, this course will continue the process of developing global competency by refining oral proficiency skills and learning to engage with some of the cultural products and practices of different communities in Spain and Latin America. In this course students will learn to use their language skills as a tool to discover themes related to social justice that inform each community under study. Such themes may include: religion, violence, social, political, economic and criminal justice, oppression, power, ideology, corruption, environmental degradation, racism, sexism, homophobia, and the role of social change movements. The end result will not only be the ability to better understand cultural perspectives of Spanish speaking communities, but also students will learn how to independently identify and engage with the cultural perspectives of any community. Prerequisite: SPA 202. Offered Fall.

SPA 320 Cr.3

Spanish Civilization

A study of the civilization of Spain, from pre-historic times to the present; this includes such topics as political developments, geography, literature, art, music, and the current situation. Prerequisite: SPA 300 or (SPA 303 and SPA 304). Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 321 Cr.3

Spanish American Civilization

A study of the political, social, intellectual, artistic and literary development of Spanish America. Prerequisite: SPA 300 or (SPA 303 and SPA 304). Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 323 Cr.3

Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course celebrates students’ multilingual and multicultural skills while supporting their competency in reading, writing, and grammar in Spanish. Students achieve these goals by understanding linguistic diversity and social responsibility through the lens of language awareness. The course focuses on the many varieties of Spanish that exist, how these varieties are accepted or stigmatized in the context of the United States, and what this means for the speakers of these varieties. This course has a writing focus. Consent of department. Offered Fall.

SPA 324 Cr.3

Spanish for Professional Communication

This course focuses on the linguistic and cultural elements that contribute to successful communication in professional settings in Spanish. In this class, we explore the ways that diversity in language and the dialects of Spanish play an inherent role in this type of communication. We also focus on how to be responsible social actors in cross-cultural professional settings. This course has a speaking focus. Prerequisite: SPA 202. Offered Fall.

SPA 326 Cr.1

Current Events

A weekly discussion of current events in the Spanish-speaking world, based on readings, web-based news sources and television broadcasts in the target language. Students may take as many times as desired, but only three credits will count towards major/minor. Prerequisite: SPA 300 or (SPA 303 and SPA 304). Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 330 Cr.3

Advanced Grammar and Syntax

A comprehensive survey of grammatical principles with an examination of the main syntactical elements of the Spanish language. Prerequisite: SPA 300 or (SPA 303 and SPA 304). Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 331 Cr.3

Spanish Phonetics

Comparison of English and Spanish sounds. Systematic study of the production of Spanish sounds. Individual work with native tapes and recording of student’s pronunciation and intonation. Prerequisite: SPA 300 or SPA 303. Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 333 Cr.3

Work and Play in Diverse Communities

Throughout this course, students will explore diverse Spanish-speaking communities through the lens of both the professional world and the personal world. To do so, students will analyze the societal impacts of work and play in different cultural contexts while also reviewing and mastering important grammatical concepts in Spanish. Students will have opportunities to apply their knowledge regularly in real-world tasks related to the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Content and grammar instruction and practice will be presented in relevant cultural contexts, paying special attention to the ways in which different forms can be used to make meaning and do things with the language in different spheres of society. Students will build upon their previous language experience to achieve a greater level of proficiency for reading and writing in Spanish while also gaining a deeper understanding of diversity and social responsibility in both the professional and personal sectors. Prerequisite: SPA 202. Offered Fall.

SPA 351 Cr.4

Films in Spanish

The study of films of the Spanish-speaking world. Film viewing, discussion and writing assignments will all be in Spanish. Lect. 3, Lab 2. Prerequisite: SPA 300 or (SPA 303 and SPA 304). Offered Spring.

SPA 352 Cr.3

Voices of Revolution

Revolutions inform the way nations identify themselves as individuals and as a community in the post-war era. These identities continue to inform the nation’s culture long after the conflict ends. This course explores the way in which the social and historic aspects of the revolution form and inform the cultural output during and after the conflict. Students will examine and reflect on the formation of national identity, and through cultural texts such as narratives, film, art, and song they will interpret and engage with the many perspectives, or faces of revolution. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Fall.

SPA 353 Cr.3

Perspectives on Contemporary Spain: Culture and Society

Spain has gone through deep transformations during the last few decades that have affected the concept of its national and cultural identity. In the light of these changes, this course analyzes aspects of contemporary Spain related to its economy, politics, culture, and social structures. It investigates trends on immigration and emigration, nationalisms, role of the European Union, environmental concerns, and popular culture. This social and cultural context will also be analyzed through its practices and cultural products, especially through contemporary Spanish film. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Spring.

SPA 354 Cr.3

Artistic Expression and Society in the Spanish-Speaking World

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the literary and artistic production of the Spanish-speaking world in its social and cultural contexts. Students will study the visual arts, short films and narratives, and poetry. A main focus will be on identities and cultural perspectives, as well as the development of intercultural competence. In addition, students will review language functions specific to the genres studied. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Fall.

SPA 355 Cr.3

Latinx in the U.S.: Culture and Society

This course is an introduction to the historic, social and cultural contexts of Latinx culture in the United States. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students analyze literature, art, music, media, film, performance, and social activism which reflect the main events and social movements in the trajectory of Latinx culture in the U.S. The course focuses on the impact of U.S. colonialism and imperialism on Latinx social systems in the U.S., as well as Latin American migrations and their impact on modern-day Latinx identities. The course also explores issues of statehood, racism, gender inequalities, cultural hybridization, and immigration. Conducted in Spanish with some materials in Spanglish. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Fall.

SPA 369 Cr.3

Topics in Hispanic Cultures

A course designed to investigate areas of current social and cultural interest in Hispanic/Latin American culture. Topics will vary. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Occasionally.

SPA 370 Cr.3

Spanish for the Health Professions

In this course students will develop linguistic, professional, and cultural skills necessary to work with and advocate for Spanish-speaking patients in the healthcare professions. To do this, students will learn how Limited English Proficient patients experience the United States healthcare system and reflect on their own role as cultural brokers in this setting. Class activities and assignments are designed to allow the student to engage with and interpret the healthcare system from the perspective of Spanish-speaking patients. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 380 Cr.3

Spanish Language in Contexts

This course focuses on developing students’ pragmatic competence in Spanish, or knowledge of how to use the language appropriately in different social contexts. Even with advanced linguistic proficiency, we can experience breakdowns in communication or even offend others if we are unaware of the cultural norms and perspectives that govern how to use linguistic forms appropriately in different situations. Thus, the objective of this course is to equip students with the linguistic and cultural knowledge they need to use Spanish appropriately in real and meaningful contexts. To do so, students will analyze how culturally-confined politeness norms, contextual elements, and speakers’ identities impact how language is used to carry out different speech acts such as requests, invitations, and apologies, among others. Furthermore, students will compare variation in pragmatic norms among different Spanish and American English-speaking communities and reflect upon how cultural perspectives and identities influence how we do things with words. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Fall.

SPA 381 Cr.3

The Sounds of Spanish

Through a cross-linguistic approach, students reflect on the major phonetic and phonological differences between Spanish and American English in order to promote awareness and thus development of their second language pronunciation. Students will also analyze authentic and meaningful audiovisual materials, which will expose them to major geographical, social and contextual varieties of Spanish-speaking communities. Finally, following a sociolinguistic approach, students reflect on the relationship between phonetic/phonological variation and the formation, development and perception of social and cultural identities; as well as on the development of their own identity as adult speakers of a second language. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Fall.

SPA 382 Cr.3

Spanish Storytelling

This course focuses on developing learners’ linguistic and cultural competence in Spanish at the ACTFL intermediate-mid level through the process of storytelling. Adopting a multiliteracies approach to learning, students will analyze and evaluate various types of stories and/or texts in Spanish and discuss the different visual, cultural, and/or linguistic elements. Content in this course might include, but is not limited to, TED Talks, podcasts, personal narratives, written histories, and short films. Through the analysis of the content in this course, students will then create a culminating story of their own, one in which they will share about diverse perspectives and identities that are present in the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: four courses from the following: SPA 302, SPA 307, SPA 310, SPA 323, SPA 324, SPA 333. Offered Fall, Spring.

SPA 403 Cr.3

Studies in Hispanic Literature

This course is designed to allow flexibility in the study of current topics of interest in Spanish or Latin American literature. Prerequisite: two courses from the following: SPA 352, SPA 353, SPA 354, SPA 355, SPA 369, SPA 370, SPA 380, SPA 381, SPA 382. Offered Occasionally.

SPA 443 Cr.3

Studies in Hispanic Linguistics

This course introduces students to the discipline of linguistics through a focus on Spanish-speaking communities and the linguistic diversity amongst them. Students will learn key theoretical concepts in linguistics by addressing areas of study such as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, acquisition of a language, variation, and linguistic change. Students will reflect on diversity and on their identity as speakers of multiple languages in order to develop their role as multilingual agents for social responsibility. Prerequisite: two courses from the following: SPA 352, SPA 353, SPA 354, SPA 355, SPA 369, SPA 370, SPA 380, SPA 381, SPA 382. Offered Spring.

SPA 450 Cr.1-4

National/International Intern Program

A course in Spanish individually tailored to fit career needs: cultural awareness, technical vocabulary in Spanish to prepare students who elect internship credits in other departments. Spanish majors or minors, or other students having the equivalency of SPA 202 may elect to take these credits off campus. Repeatable for credit - maximum four. Offered Occasionally.

SPA 498 Cr.1-3

Independent Study

Fieldwork, research and individual projects in a specific area of Spanish language, civilization or literature. Registration with the consent of instructor and the department chair. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: two advanced courses and junior standing. Consent of department. Offered Occasionally.

SPA 499 Cr.1-3

Independent Study

Fieldwork, research, individual projects in a specific area of Spanish language, civilization or literature. Registration with the consent of instructor and the department chairperson. Repeatable for credit - maximum six. Prerequisite: two advanced courses and junior standing. Consent of department. Offered Occasionally.

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